TOUR OF THE ROOMS

View of the room 10 with works by Rottluff, Daumier, De Troyer, Hofer and others.

TOUR OF THE ROOMS

View of the room 10 with works by Rottluff, Daumier, De Troyer, Hofer and others.

Planta inferior

GROUND FLOOR

Planta superior

FIRST FLOOR

Planta inferior

GROUND FLOOR

Planta superior

FIRST FLOOR

ROOMS -1 and 1
Vista de las salas -1 y 1, con las obras de Navarro (suelo) y Ceccobelli

View of rooms -1 and 1 with works by Navarro (on the ground) and Ceccobelli.

Miquel Navarro, Sombras Lunares

Miquel Navarro, Sombras Lunares.

Atlante, Bruno Ceccobelli

Paul Manes, The Fifth Seal.

Atlante, Bruno Ceccobelli

Jan Vanriet, Roberto Polo.

ROOMS -1 (temporary exhibition) and 1

 

-1 Miquel Navarro (Spanish, 1945)
Sombras lunares, 2005, cast iron

Born in Mislata (Valencia), where he still lives. He studied at the San Carlos Academy in Valencia; he began as a painter, but since 1972 he has devoted himself almost exclusively to sculpture. He received the National Prize of Plastic Arts in 1986 and many other awards (from the Association of Art Critics; from the Generalitat Valenciana; the Julio González International Prize in 2008, etc.). Also in 2008, he became a member of the Academy of San Fernando. He has works in museums all over the world (the Guggenheim in New York, the Reina Sofía in Madrid, IVAM in Valencia, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Sofia Imbert in Caracas, Germany, Japan, etc.) and in leading collections (Banco de España, Argentaria, Renfe, Aena, etc.). He has participated in countless solo and group exhibitions since 1973. He is particularly known for monumental sculpture for public spaces (Valencia, Bilbao, Vitoria, Madrid, Brussels, etc.).

 

1 René Stoeltie (Dutch, 1957)
Roberto Polo, The Eye, 2010, unique archival pigment print on fine art paper
CRP287

Born in Arnhem (Holland), his family immediately settled in Amsterdam, where he studied graphic design. In 1979 he went to Brussels and in 1980 he opened a gallery. Since 1988 he has published photographs in many major magazines with his wife, Barbara, an artist and art critic. He worked in interior design in numerous cities while exhibiting photographs and publishing books. In 2013 they open the Geminal Gallery in Brussels, which in 2018 moved to Latam-Saint-Martin.

 

2 Bruno Ceccobelli (Italian, 1952)
Atlante (formerly entitled Cosmo di cosmo), 2004, mordant on felt
CRP292

Born in Montecastello di Vibio (Italy). Painter and sculptor, he lives and works in Todi. He was one of the six founders of the Nuova Scuola Romana or Scuola di San Lorenzo, a movement that arose from Arte Povera and Transavantgarde art in the late 20th century; in the early 80s he settled with other artists in a large abandoned industrial space in the San Lorenzo district of Rome. In 1984 he gave a training course at the National School of Fine Arts in Senegal, which came to be a very important experience for him. In 2003 he published a collection of essays on his desire for a future aesthetic society. In 2009 he held a retrospective on the San Lorenzo group in Rovereto. Over all these years, he has participated in several exhibitions in Italy and abroad.

 

3 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
Roberto Polo, 2014, oil on canvas
CRP268

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels, 1082 in Paris and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

4 Paul Manes (American, 1948)
The Fifth Seal, 2006, oil on canvas 
CRP251

Born in Austin, Texas (USA). He graduated in Business Administration from Lamar University (Beaumont) and in Fine Arts from Hunter College in New York. Since 1985, when he participated in a group exhibition at the Kouros gallery, he has shown his work in museums and galleries in the USA, Italy, France and Germany. His work is both abstract and figurative, and he makes no distinction between the two. Far from the artistic trends in vogue, he was inspired by creators such as Goya, Bosch, Velázquez, El Greco, Rembrandt, Cézanne, Pollock and Rauschenberg. In his words, “the present is connected with the past and becomes a projection into the future, where tradition meets innovation and the world is unblocked and becomes liquid and gaseous and forms are transformed into new forms”. After more than 30 years in New York, in 2014 he moved to Carbondale (Colorado). His works are now in MoMA, the Solomon R. Guggenheim, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Art Museum of Southwest Texas. In 2016 he was included in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, at the Vanderborght of Brussels, the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta.

 

ROOMS -1 and 1

Vista de las salas -1 y 1, con las obras de Navarro (suelo) y Ceccobelli

View of rooms -1 and 1 with works by Navarro (on the ground) and Ceccobelli.

Miquel Navarro, Sombras Lunares

Miquel Navarro, Sombras Lunares.

Atlante, Bruno Ceccobelli

Paul Manes, The Fifth Seal.

Atlante, Bruno Ceccobelli

Jan Vanriet, Roberto Polo.

ROOMS -1 (temporary exhibition) and 1

-1 Miquel Navarro (Spanish, 1945)
Sombras lunares, 2005, cast iron

Born in Mislata (Valencia), where he still lives. He studied at the San Carlos Academy in Valencia; he began as a painter, but since 1972 he has devoted himself almost exclusively to sculpture. He received the National Prize of Plastic Arts in 1986 and many other awards (from the Association of Art Critics; from the Generalitat Valenciana; the Julio González International Prize in 2008, etc.). Also in 2008, he became a member of the Academy of San Fernando. He has works in museums all over the world (the Guggenheim in New York, the Reina Sofía in Madrid, IVAM in Valencia, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Sofia Imbert in Caracas, Germany, Japan, etc.) and in leading collections (Banco de España, Argentaria, Renfe, Aena, etc.). He has participated in countless solo and group exhibitions since 1973. He is particularly known for monumental sculpture for public spaces (Valencia, Bilbao, Vitoria, Madrid, Brussels, etc.).

 

1 René Stoeltie (Dutch, 1957)
Roberto Polo, The Eye, 2010, unique archival pigment print on fine art paper
CRP287

Born in Arnhem (Holland), his family immediately settled in Amsterdam, where he studied graphic design. In 1979 he went to Brussels and in 1980 he opened a gallery. Since 1988 he has published photographs in many major magazines with his wife, Barbara, an artist and art critic. He worked in interior design in numerous cities while exhibiting photographs and publishing books. In 2013 they open the Geminal Gallery in Brussels, which in 2018 moved to Latam-Saint-Martin.

 

2 Bruno Ceccobelli (Italian, 1952)
Atlante (formerly entitled Cosmo di cosmo), 2004, mordant on felt
CRP292

Born in Montecastello di Vibio (Italy). Painter and sculptor, he lives and works in Todi. He was one of the six founders of the Nuova Scuola Romana or Scuola di San Lorenzo, a movement that arose from Arte Povera and Transavantgarde art in the late 20th century; in the early 80s he settled with other artists in a large abandoned industrial space in the San Lorenzo district of Rome. In 1984 he gave a training course at the National School of Fine Arts in Senegal, which came to be a very important experience for him. In 2003 he published a collection of essays on his desire for a future aesthetic society. In 2009 he held a retrospective on the San Lorenzo group in Rovereto. Over all these years, he has participated in several exhibitions in Italy and abroad.

 

3 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
Roberto Polo, 2014, oil on canvas
CRP268

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels, 1082 in Paris and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

4 Paul Manes (American, 1948)
The Fifth Seal, 2006, oil on canvas 
CRP251

Born in Austin, Texas (USA). He graduated in Business Administration from Lamar University (Beaumont) and in Fine Arts from Hunter College in New York. Since 1985, when he participated in a group exhibition at the Kouros gallery, he has shown his work in museums and galleries in the USA, Italy, France and Germany. His work is both abstract and figurative, and he makes no distinction between the two. Far from the artistic trends in vogue, he was inspired by creators such as Goya, Bosch, Velázquez, El Greco, Rembrandt, Cézanne, Pollock and Rauschenberg. In his words, “the present is connected with the past and becomes a projection into the future, where tradition meets innovation and the world is unblocked and becomes liquid and gaseous and forms are transformed into new forms”. After more than 30 years in New York, in 2014 he moved to Carbondale (Colorado). His works are now in MoMA, the Solomon R. Guggenheim, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Art Museum of Southwest Texas. In 2016 he was included in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, at the Vanderborght of Brussels, the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta.

 

ROOM 2

Vista de sala, con obras de Mellery (izq. y centro) y de Spilliaert

View of room 2 with works by Mellery (left and center) and Spilliaert.

1 Xavier Mellery, Au Béguinage. Pendant la prière du jour.

Xavier Mellery, Au Béguinage. Pendant la prière du jour.

3 Léon Spilliaert, Notre Dame au coeur

Léon Spilliaert, Notre Dame au coeur.

Paul Manes, The Entry of Christ into New York II.

Paul Manes, The Entry of Christ into New York II.

Paul Manes, La noche oscura

Paul Manes, The Vision of Saint John.

ROOM 2

 

1 Xavier Mellery (Belgian, 1845-1921)
Au Béguinage. Pendant la prière du jour, 1890, charcoal, India ink and watercolour on paper
CRP010

Born in Laken (Belgium). A painter, draughtsman and illustrator, he was considered to be the precursor of the Belgian Symbolist movement. He began working with Charles Albert, a painter and decorator; he trained at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, mainly with Jean-François Portaels. In 1870 he won the Rome Prize and went to study Renaissance painting (he was particularly fascinated by the Sistine Chapel and Carpaccio). He designed the 48 sculptures of the historical trades for the Petit Sablon in Brussels. Fernand Khnopff is the most distinguished of his disciples. His works can be found at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium.

An artist whose preferences favoured the representation of interiors, he excelled in those of church and convents, very suitable for his taste for collected, close and familar scenes, peopled by little calm figures, in both these works dedicated to their chores. In During the daily prayer it is striking that the only one that is facing us does not have a face, nor does crucified Christ, which, curiously, has greater corporeality than the flat figures of the nuns.

 

2 Xavier Mellery (Belgian, 1845-1921) 
L’Ouvroirc. 1890, charcoal on paper
CRP011

This drawing includes a religious image similar to the Christ of the previous work; the atmosphere, enhanced by the light, is very calm and the silence it emanates is more placid than that of the other work, somewhat mysterious and disturbing. Beguines were a feminin secular order founded in the Netherlands in the 12th century; its members led lives of religious devotion but do not took formal vows and they were free to leave the community in order to marry. It was believed that its name derived from Lambert Bègue or Le Bègue, the stummerer, a priest from Liège. 

 

3 Léon Spilliaert (Belgian, 1881-1946)
Notre Dame au coeur, 1907, India ink wash, watercolour & coloured pencil on paper
CRP030

Born in Ostend (Belgium). His was self-taught; in his youth he drew scenes of daily life in rural areas of Belgium. His style was symbolist and expressionist; it would be characterised by dark tones, a nightmarish atmosphere and feelings of anguish and loneliness; revealing influences by artists such as Munch and Khnopff. He used watercolour, gouache, pastel and mixtures of techniques. In his later days, he painted the sea in more colourful works. He made, especially at the beginning of the 20th century, numerous self-portraits in tones that tend towards monochrome, like the majority of his productions, preserved mainly in the museums of Ostend and Brussels; he also has works in the Musée d’Orsay.

This strange work falls within the genre most cultivated by the artist after portraiture and landscape: still life. It would seem the it reproduces an image he would have seen occasionally and that would have shocked him because of the addition of what seems to be an ex voto or an offering, a heart-shaped pendant. We could venture an analysis in relation to his tendency to hallucinatory and uncanny things, which found expression in his enthusiasm for Poe, who, together with Nietzsche and Belgian Symbolist Maeterlinck, had a remarkable influence on him.    

 

4 Jean-Joseph Carriès (French,1855-1894) 
La Mère Callamand, c. 1888 plaster patinated vieux bois
CRP009

Sculptor, ceramist and miniaturist born in Lyon. In 1864 he went to Paris to study at the École des Beaux-Arts with Augustin-Alexandre Dumont. He exhibited for the first time in the Paris Salons of 1879 and 1881. After seeing a sample of Japanese pieces at the 1878 International Exposition in Paris, he began making polychrome masks with terrifying grimaces. In 1892 he presented a large exhibition in Paris; the French Minister of Culture and a museum in Hamburg acquired his works. That year he was awarded a Legion of Honour. In 1893 he created Faune, his most famous sculpture.

The nun Marie-Anne Agnès Callamand, one of the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, was born in 1810 and died en 1882 (so the bust would be a posthumous tribute) or in 1892. As a Mother Superior, she was in charge of the orphanage where Carriès, orphaned since he age of 6, and his sister and his two brothers lived. She took care of them and, seeing that Jean-Joseph had artistic talent, apprentised him with the sculptor Pierre Vermare, dedicated to the creation of devotional objects; later he would go to Paris. His sister, who became a nun, died at an early age. Carriès made a bust of her entitled La novice.

The exhibition Jean-Joseph Carriès, la matière de l`étrange, celebrated at the Petit Palais of Paris in 2007-08, dedicated a gallery to this early period in the artist’s life in Lyon; it contained another bust of the nun entitled La réligieuse (Musée de la Ville de Paris).

 

5 Paul Manes (American, 1948)
The Entry of Christ in New York, 1993-2006, oil on canvas
CRP250

Born in Austin, Texas (USA). He graduated in Business Administration from Lamar University (Beaumont) and in Fine Arts from Hunter College in New York. Since 1985, when he participated in a group exhibition at the Kouros gallery, he has shown his work in museums and galleries in the USA, Italy, France and Germany. His work is both abstract and figurative, and he makes no distinction between the two. Far from the artistic trends in vogue, he was inspired by creators such as Goya, Bosch, Velázquez, El Greco, Rembrandt, Cézanne, Pollock and Rauschenberg. In his words, “the present is connected with the past and becomes a projection into the future, where tradition meets innovation and the world is unblocked and becomes liquid and gaseous and forms are transformed into new forms”. After more than 30 years in New York, in 2014 he moved to Carbondale (Colorado). His works are now in MoMA, the Solomon R. Guggenheim, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Art Museum of Southwest Texas. In 2016 he was included in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, at the Vanderborght of Brussels, the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta.

Its title and conception allude to the work by Belgian James Ensor’s Entry of Christ in Brussels (1889), with its faces transformed in masks and his air of grotesque farce.

 

6 Paul Manes (American, 1948)
The Vision of Saint John, 1986, oil on canvas
CRP252

 

7 Gustave Moreau (French, 1826-1898) 
La Chimèrec. 1856, tinta china sobre papel/India ink and on paper
CRP003

The most important French symbolist painter was born in Paris and was a disciple of the eclectic Chassériau, whose paintings of sea goddesses impressed him deeply. He is well known for the eroticism of his oils and watercolours of mythological and religious subjects and for his enigmatic interpretations of figures from ancient history and mythology, such as Salome or Oedipus. He showed a growing interest in exoticism and violence; his luminous colours, like precious stones, are enhanced by dramatic lighting. He taught at the École des Beaux Arts and his classes became very popular; some of his students were later outstanding Fauvists, including Matisse and Rouault. He bequeathed his house and some 8,000 works to the French state; they now form the Musée Gustave Moreau in Paris.

There are several versions of the same subject, dated 1867: two in oil on board (Wildenstein Collection and Cambridge Fogg Art Museum, USA) and one in gouache, from around the same year (formerly Collection Duruffé, exhibited in 1906); around 1879 he will add a circular watercolour. The composition will be repeated in a gouache and some enamels in the seventies and 1897. Moreau knew the Chimera of Arezzo, an Etruscan work in bronze. Instead of the monster made up of a lion, a goat and a dragon, it represents a winged centaur  leaping into the void from a cliff with a woman hanging from his neck. In the fifities and sixties the artist has not yet become a creator of myths and this is one of his few works dominated by overflowing fantasy. The Chimera is a subject cherished by imagination in France because of its multiple symbolic and psychological meanings; it appears often in the 19th-century literature from Romanticism to Symbolism, but less so in art. Moreau’s interpretation is close to Théophile Gautier’s poem, although here it is a feminine symbol and for the painter a male character. This one drags the woman to destruction, as a note by Moreau on the dangers of fantasy reveals.

ROOM 2

Vista de sala, con obras de Mellery (izq. y centro) y de Spilliaert

View of room 2 with works by Mellery (left and center) and Spilliaert.

1 Xavier Mellery, Au Béguinage. Pendant la prière du jour.

Xavier Mellery, Au Béguinage. Pendant la prière du jour.

3 Léon Spilliaert, Notre Dame au coeur

Léon Spilliaert, Notre Dame au coeur.

Paul Manes, The Entry of Christ into New York II.

Paul Manes, The Entry of Christ into New York II.

Paul Manes, La noche oscura

Paul Manes, The Vision of Saint John.

ROOM 2

 

1 Xavier Mellery (Belgian, 1845-1921)
Au Béguinage. Pendant la prière du jour, 1890, charcoal, India ink and watercolour on paper
CRP010

Born in Laken (Belgium). A painter, draughtsman and illustrator, he was considered to be the precursor of the Belgian Symbolist movement. He began working with Charles Albert, a painter and decorator; he trained at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, mainly with Jean-François Portaels. In 1870 he won the Rome Prize and went to study Renaissance painting (he was particularly fascinated by the Sistine Chapel and Carpaccio). He designed the 48 sculptures of the historical trades for the Petit Sablon in Brussels. Fernand Khnopff is the most distinguished of his disciples. His works can be found at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium.

An artist whose preferences favoured the representation of interiors, he excelled in those of church and convents, very suitable for his taste for collected, close and familar scenes, peopled by little calm figures, in both these works dedicated to their chores. In During the daily prayer it is striking that the only one that is facing us does not have a face, nor does crucified Christ, which, curiously, has greater corporeality than the flat figures of the nuns.

 

2 Xavier Mellery (Belgian, 1845-1921) 
L’Ouvroirc. 1890, charcoal on paper
CRP011

This drawing includes a religious image similar to the Christ of the previous work; the atmosphere, enhanced by the light, is very calm and the silence it emanates is more placid than that of the other work, somewhat mysterious and disturbing. Beguines were a feminin secular order founded in the Netherlands in the 12th century; its members led lives of religious devotion but do not took formal vows and they were free to leave the community in order to marry. It was believed that its name derived from Lambert Bègue or Le Bègue, the stummerer, a priest from Liège. 

 

3 Léon Spilliaert (Belgian, 1881-1946)
Notre Dame au coeur, 1907, India ink wash, watercolour & coloured pencil on paper
CRP030

Born in Ostend (Belgium). His was self-taught; in his youth he drew scenes of daily life in rural areas of Belgium. His style was symbolist and expressionist; it would be characterised by dark tones, a nightmarish atmosphere and feelings of anguish and loneliness; revealing influences by artists such as Munch and Khnopff. He used watercolour, gouache, pastel and mixtures of techniques. In his later days, he painted the sea in more colourful works. He made, especially at the beginning of the 20th century, numerous self-portraits in tones that tend towards monochrome, like the majority of his productions, preserved mainly in the museums of Ostend and Brussels; he also has works in the Musée d’Orsay.

This strange work falls within the genre most cultivated by the artist after portraiture and landscape: still life. It would seem the it reproduces an image he would have seen occasionally and that would have shocked him because of the addition of what seems to be an ex voto or an offering, a heart-shaped pendant. We could venture an analysis in relation to his tendency to hallucinatory and uncanny things, which found expression in his enthusiasm for Poe, who, together with Nietzsche and Belgian Symbolist Maeterlinck, had a remarkable influence on him.    

 

4 Jean-Joseph Carriès (French,1855-1894) 
La Mère Callamand, c. 1888 plaster patinated vieux bois
CRP009

Sculptor, ceramist and miniaturist born in Lyon. In 1864 he went to Paris to study at the École des Beaux-Arts with Augustin-Alexandre Dumont. He exhibited for the first time in the Paris Salons of 1879 and 1881. After seeing a sample of Japanese pieces at the 1878 International Exposition in Paris, he began making polychrome masks with terrifying grimaces. In 1892 he presented a large exhibition in Paris; the French Minister of Culture and a museum in Hamburg acquired his works. That year he was awarded a Legion of Honour. In 1893 he created Faune, his most famous sculpture.

The nun Marie-Anne Agnès Callamand, one of the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, was born in 1810 and died en 1882 (so the bust would be a posthumous tribute) or in 1892. As a Mother Superior, she was in charge of the orphanage where Carriès, orphaned since he age of 6, and his sister and his two brothers lived. She took care of them and, seeing that Jean-Joseph had artistic talent, apprentised him with the sculptor Pierre Vermare, dedicated to the creation of devotional objects; later he would go to Paris. His sister, who became a nun, died at an early age. Carriès made a bust of her entitled La novice.

The exhibition Jean-Joseph Carriès, la matière de l`étrange, celebrated at the Petit Palais of Paris in 2007-08, dedicated a gallery to this early period in the artist’s life in Lyon; it contained another bust of the nun entitled La réligieuse (Musée de la Ville de Paris).

 

5 Paul Manes (American, 1948)
The Entry of Christ in New York, 1993-2006, oil on canvas
CRP250

Born in Austin, Texas (USA). He graduated in Business Administration from Lamar University (Beaumont) and in Fine Arts from Hunter College in New York. Since 1985, when he participated in a group exhibition at the Kouros gallery, he has shown his work in museums and galleries in the USA, Italy, France and Germany. His work is both abstract and figurative, and he makes no distinction between the two. Far from the artistic trends in vogue, he was inspired by creators such as Goya, Bosch, Velázquez, El Greco, Rembrandt, Cézanne, Pollock and Rauschenberg. In his words, “the present is connected with the past and becomes a projection into the future, where tradition meets innovation and the world is unblocked and becomes liquid and gaseous and forms are transformed into new forms”. After more than 30 years in New York, in 2014 he moved to Carbondale (Colorado). His works are now in MoMA, the Solomon R. Guggenheim, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Art Museum of Southwest Texas. In 2016 he was included in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, at the Vanderborght of Brussels, the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta.

Its title and conception allude to the work by Belgian James Ensor’s Entry of Christ in Brussels (1889), with its faces transformed in masks and his air of grotesque farce.

 

6 Paul Manes (American, 1948)
The Vision of Saint John, 1986, oil on canvas
CRP252

 

7 Gustave Moreau (French, 1826-1898) 
La Chimèrec. 1856, tinta china sobre papel/India ink and on paper
CRP003

The most important French symbolist painter was born in Paris and was a disciple of the eclectic Chassériau, whose paintings of sea goddesses impressed him deeply. He is well known for the eroticism of his oils and watercolours of mythological and religious subjects and for his enigmatic interpretations of figures from ancient history and mythology, such as Salome or Oedipus. He showed a growing interest in exoticism and violence; his luminous colours, like precious stones, are enhanced by dramatic lighting. He taught at the École des Beaux Arts and his classes became very popular; some of his students were later outstanding Fauvists, including Matisse and Rouault. He bequeathed his house and some 8,000 works to the French state; they now form the Musée Gustave Moreau in Paris.

There are several versions of the same subject, dated 1867: two in oil on board (Wildenstein Collection and Cambridge Fogg Art Museum, USA) and one in gouache, from around the same year (formerly Collection Duruffé, exhibited in 1906); around 1879 he will add a circular watercolour. The composition will be repeated in a gouache and some enamels in the seventies and 1897. Moreau knew the Chimera of Arezzo, an Etruscan work in bronze. Instead of the monster made up of a lion, a goat and a dragon, it represents a winged centaur  leaping into the void from a cliff with a woman hanging from his neck. In the fifities and sixties the artist has not yet become a creator of myths and this is one of his few works dominated by overflowing fantasy. The Chimera is a subject cherished by imagination in France because of its multiple symbolic and psychological meanings; it appears often in the 19th-century literature from Romanticism to Symbolism, but less so in art. Moreau’s interpretation is close to Théophile Gautier’s poem, although here it is a feminine symbol and for the painter a male character. This one drags the woman to destruction, as a note by Moreau on the dangers of fantasy reveals.

ROOM 3

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 3 with Longobardi´s Gesú in the middle and works by Vanriet and De Cock on the walls.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (diptych 1).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (diptych 2).

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Koen De Cock, Laying Man 1.

Koen De Cock, Laying Man 1.

ROOM 3

 

1 Andrew Tift (English, 1968)
22 Years Later (diptych), 2016, acrylic on canvas – 1 and 2
CRP383

A figurative realist painter specialising in portraiture, he was born in Walsall (England), he studied at Stafford College of Art and graduated from the University of Central England. In 1995 he exhibited Sayonara Pet at the National Portrait Gallery in London, a series based on workers in the Japanese automobile industry, and won the BP Travel Award. In 1998 he portrayed Tony Benn, a Labour member of the House of Commons. In 2003 he was invited by Andreeva to his gallery in Santa Fe (New Mexico), to explore the region and make portraits of its people–Native Americans, hippies, cowboys and Vietnam veterans–which he exhibited in the US in 2004. His works are regularly exhibited in the annual BP Portrait Award competition. In 2006 he won first prize for his triptych of Kitty Garman, Lucien Freud’s first wife; other awards include the Festival of Japan, the European Painting at the Frissiras Museum in Athens and the Emerson Group (Manchester Academy of Fine Arts). In 2009 he presented Portraits, works inspired by his travels through New Mexico and Tokyo, at Plus One Gallery (London). In 2018 he exhibited at The New Art Gallery in Walsall.

 

2 Nino Longobardi (Italian, 1953)
Gesù, 2018, resin and brass
CRP389

Born in Naples (Italy). Self-taught, in 1968 he met gallery owner Lucio Amelio and critics and artists such as Carlo Alfano and Joseph Beuys, who influenced him. His work focused on the male figure, with few synthetic strokes and a reduced chromatic palette. With drawing, painting and sculpture he explored subjects such as the body, death and the weight of the past. In 1978 he held his first solo exhibition in Gianni Pisani’s studio, which was followed by various exhibitions in Amelio’s gallery. In November 1980, the Irpinia earthquake, which caused significant damage in Naples, added a tragic sense to his creations; he explored the destructive power of nature and collaborated with Amelio in the large exhibition Terrae Motus on the theme of the earthquake, with works by more than 50 prominent international artists. In 1982 he took part in the collective Italian art now: an American perspective (Guggenheim, New York) and in Avanguardia Transavanguardia (Aurelian Walls in Rome). In 1983 he presented his work at the Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona. In 1998 he exhibited in the Royal Palace of Milan and in 1999 in the Neapolitan Castel Nuovo; in 2000, in the Civic Gallery of Modena; in 2001, in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples and in 2013 in the National Museum of Capodimonte.

 

3 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Moments before the flood, Stonehaven, UK, 2009, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 5
CRP328

Born in Schoten (Antwerp, Belgium). He studied photography at the Ghent Academy. In 1982 he began his career as a freelance photographer and was one of the founders of the XYZ photo gallery. From 1982 and 1989 he taught at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent, at the Higher Institute of Fine Arts in Antwerp and at the School of Decorative Arts in Paris. In 1994 he joined the Magnum agency. In the triptych Trinity (2007) he deals with power and violence in the world; his Congo (2009) reflects the spirit of the country before its independence; with Moments before the flood (2012) he warns of the dangers of global warming: in the series Cuba, the struggle (2015), exhibited in the Roberto Polo gallery (Brussels), he analyses the slow transition from communism to a more capitalist mentality. He has also witnessed the labour camps of Siberia, daily life in India, Russia before and after the fall of the Wall and juvenile delinquency in Flanders. He has received the Arles Festival Book Award (1990), and the W. Eugene Smith (1990) and Kodak (1992) awards. In 2012 he was elected a member of the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences of Brussels. His work is exhibited in galleries and museums all over the world.

 

4 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Red Roosenary, 2008, glass, climbing rope, and a 16th century Madonna
CRP312

Born in Oisterwijk (Holland). She studied at the Academy of Art and Design in Arnhem and at the Moller Instituut in Tilburg. She creates sculptures, installations, conceptual art and drawings. She represented Holland at the 1995 Venice Biennale. She has received important awards such as the Wilhelminaring for Dutch sculpture (2006) and the Singer Prijs (2009). Her work, the process of which has a marked artisan element (using ceramics, wood, glass, crochet), deals with issues such as growth, fertility, love, friendship, death and the rapid passing of everyday life. Branches, fruits, sunflowers, jars, breasts, seeds and shoes are common motifs in her pieces, which are often showcased outdoors. She regularly works with collaborators, including Nepalese embroiderers and master glassmakers from the Czech Republic. She considers her sculptures to be “tools for feelings”. Her work, included in numerous private collections, has been exhibited in spaces such as the Kunsthal KAdE in Amersfoort, the Croninger Museum and the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam.

 

5 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
Marrano, Trace (Black), 2002, oil on canvas
CRP265

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels, 1082 in Paris and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

6 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948) 
Berlin, The Salute, 2014, oil on canvas
CRP269

 

7 Koen De Cock (Belgian,1978)
Laying Man 1, 2014, oil on canvas
CRP291

Born in Ghent (Belgium), he is settled in his hometown, but he is currently working as an artist and art teacher in Shanghai. He graduated in sculpture from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, studied one year at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tianjin (China) and another at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tbilisi (Georgia) as a postgraduate student. In 2013, Shepherds, his first solo exhibition at the Roberto Polo Gallery, stood out for its original theme, both classical and unique, and a watercolour-on-paper technique combining rigour and imagination. He then presented its direct successor, Hermits & Wrestlers, oil paintings on canvas. Both titles allude to his favourite subject, the male nude struggling to merge with exuberant and boundless nature. He admires Dürer, Cranach the Elder and Paulus Pontius, artists influenced by Michelangelo; Pontius represented parts of the body in such an extreme and unreal way that they acquired a life of their own and became a model for later artists. De Cock copied them to understand Pontius’ anatomical transformations; this learning process required technical rigour to imitate the engraved line. His nudes are symbiotically and symbolically integrated into nature, their anatomy dismembered and often struggling violently with each other.

ROOM 3

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 3 with Longobardi´s Gesú in the middle and works by Vanriet and De Cock on the walls.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (diptych 1).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (diptych 2).

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Koen De Cock, Laying Man 1.

Koen De Cock, Laying Man 1.

ROOM 3

 

1 Andrew Tift (English, 1968)
22 Years Later (diptych), 2016, acrylic on canvas – 1 and 2
CRP383

A figurative realist painter specialising in portraiture, he was born in Walsall (England), he studied at Stafford College of Art and graduated from the University of Central England. In 1995 he exhibited Sayonara Pet at the National Portrait Gallery in London, a series based on workers in the Japanese automobile industry, and won the BP Travel Award. In 1998 he portrayed Tony Benn, a Labour member of the House of Commons. In 2003 he was invited by Andreeva to his gallery in Santa Fe (New Mexico), to explore the region and make portraits of its people–Native Americans, hippies, cowboys and Vietnam veterans–which he exhibited in the US in 2004. His works are regularly exhibited in the annual BP Portrait Award competition. In 2006 he won first prize for his triptych of Kitty Garman, Lucien Freud’s first wife; other awards include the Festival of Japan, the European Painting at the Frissiras Museum in Athens and the Emerson Group (Manchester Academy of Fine Arts). In 2009 he presented Portraits, works inspired by his travels through New Mexico and Tokyo, at Plus One Gallery (London). In 2018 he exhibited at The New Art Gallery in Walsall.

 

2 Nino Longobardi (Italian, 1953)
Gesù, 2018, resin and brass
CRP389

Born in Naples (Italy). Self-taught, in 1968 he met gallery owner Lucio Amelio and critics and artists such as Carlo Alfano and Joseph Beuys, who influenced him. His work focused on the male figure, with few synthetic strokes and a reduced chromatic palette. With drawing, painting and sculpture he explored subjects such as the body, death and the weight of the past. In 1978 he held his first solo exhibition in Gianni Pisani’s studio, which was followed by various exhibitions in Amelio’s gallery. In November 1980, the Irpinia earthquake, which caused significant damage in Naples, added a tragic sense to his creations; he explored the destructive power of nature and collaborated with Amelio in the large exhibition Terrae Motus on the theme of the earthquake, with works by more than 50 prominent international artists. In 1982 he took part in the collective Italian art now: an American perspective (Guggenheim, New York) and in Avanguardia Transavanguardia (Aurelian Walls in Rome). In 1983 he presented his work at the Joan Miró Foundation in Barcelona. In 1998 he exhibited in the Royal Palace of Milan and in 1999 in the Neapolitan Castel Nuovo; in 2000, in the Civic Gallery of Modena; in 2001, in the National Archaeological Museum of Naples and in 2013 in the National Museum of Capodimonte.

 

3 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Moments before the flood, Stonehaven, UK, 2009, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 5
CRP328

Born in Schoten (Antwerp, Belgium). He studied photography at the Ghent Academy. In 1982 he began his career as a freelance photographer and was one of the founders of the XYZ photo gallery. From 1982 and 1989 he taught at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent, at the Higher Institute of Fine Arts in Antwerp and at the School of Decorative Arts in Paris. In 1994 he joined the Magnum agency. In the triptych Trinity (2007) he deals with power and violence in the world; his Congo (2009) reflects the spirit of the country before its independence; with Moments before the flood (2012) he warns of the dangers of global warming: in the series Cuba, the struggle (2015), exhibited in the Roberto Polo gallery (Brussels), he analyses the slow transition from communism to a more capitalist mentality. He has also witnessed the labour camps of Siberia, daily life in India, Russia before and after the fall of the Wall and juvenile delinquency in Flanders. He has received the Arles Festival Book Award (1990), and the W. Eugene Smith (1990) and Kodak (1992) awards. In 2012 he was elected a member of the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences of Brussels. His work is exhibited in galleries and museums all over the world.

 

4 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Red Roosenary, 2008, glass, climbing rope, and a 16th century Madonna
CRP312

Born in Oisterwijk (Holland). She studied at the Academy of Art and Design in Arnhem and at the Moller Instituut in Tilburg. She creates sculptures, installations, conceptual art and drawings. She represented Holland at the 1995 Venice Biennale. She has received important awards such as the Wilhelminaring for Dutch sculpture (2006) and the Singer Prijs (2009). Her work, the process of which has a marked artisan element (using ceramics, wood, glass, crochet), deals with issues such as growth, fertility, love, friendship, death and the rapid passing of everyday life. Branches, fruits, sunflowers, jars, breasts, seeds and shoes are common motifs in her pieces, which are often showcased outdoors. She regularly works with collaborators, including Nepalese embroiderers and master glassmakers from the Czech Republic. She considers her sculptures to be “tools for feelings”. Her work, included in numerous private collections, has been exhibited in spaces such as the Kunsthal KAdE in Amersfoort, the Croninger Museum and the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam.

 

5 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
Marrano, Trace (Black), 2002, oil on canvas
CRP265

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels, 1082 in Paris and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

6 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948) 
Berlin, The Salute, 2014, oil on canvas
CRP269

 

7 Koen De Cock (Belgian,1978)
Laying Man 1, 2014, oil on canvas
CRP291

Born in Ghent (Belgium), he is settled in his hometown, but he is currently working as an artist and art teacher in Shanghai. He graduated in sculpture from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, studied one year at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tianjin (China) and another at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tbilisi (Georgia) as a postgraduate student. In 2013, Shepherds, his first solo exhibition at the Roberto Polo Gallery, stood out for its original theme, both classical and unique, and a watercolour-on-paper technique combining rigour and imagination. He then presented its direct successor, Hermits & Wrestlers, oil paintings on canvas. Both titles allude to his favourite subject, the male nude struggling to merge with exuberant and boundless nature. He admires Dürer, Cranach the Elder and Paulus Pontius, artists influenced by Michelangelo; Pontius represented parts of the body in such an extreme and unreal way that they acquired a life of their own and became a model for later artists. De Cock copied them to understand Pontius’ anatomical transformations; this learning process required technical rigour to imitate the engraved line. His nudes are symbiotically and symbolically integrated into nature, their anatomy dismembered and often struggling violently with each other.

ROOMS 4 y 5

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 4 with the Falling Man by Ernest Trova.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Arturo Casanova, Famiglia Modigliani, omaggio ad Amedeo.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Ivan Kliun, Carpenter.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Rossella Vasta, Holzwege (poliptych).

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Rossella Vasta, Holzwege (poliptych). (2)

ROOM 4 

 

1 Ivan Kliun (Russian, 1873-1943)
Carpenter, 1915, assemblage
CRP046

He was born in Bol’shiye Gorki and began his artistic education in Kiev. In Moscow he attended the private studios of Rerberg, Fisher and Ilia Mashkov. In 1910 he came into contact with the Union of Youth and took part in its last exhibition (St Petersburg, 1913-1914); at that time he began to work in three dimensions with sculptures and reliefs inspired by Cubo-Futurism, such as Landscape Rushing By. He befriended Malevich and Matiushin; in 1915 he supported Suprematism. He collaborated in Malevich’s magazine and participated in several important exhibitions: Tram V (Petrograd, 1915), 0.10 (Petrograd, 1916), The Storeroom (Moscow, 1916) and Jack of Diamonds (Moscow 1916). In 1918 he collaborated in the decoration of Moscow for the first anniversary of the Revolution. From 1918 to 1921 he directed the Central Office of Exhibitions of the Government Department of Fine Arts; at the same time he gave classes in the Free Art Studies of the State and in the VKhUTEMAs (Higher Artistic and Technical Workshops of the State) in Moscow. In 1924 he joined the Four Arts group, which marked his departure from Suprematism in the mid-twenties, moving towards a figurative style characterised by its similarity to Ozenfant and Le Corbusier. His works can be seen at MoMA, the Los Angeles County Museum and the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid.  

The work, signed, dated and inscribed in the right side, with the title (Pilshchik, sawyer) in Cyrilic (ПИъщик / I. Kliun 1915), is made up by found objects made of natural and painted wood, metal and painted metal. Kliun was the son of a carpenter from Bolshiye Gorki, a hamlet close to Moscow. He exhibited his sculpture for the first time at 0.10: The last Futurist exhibition. As far as we know, only four of the 16 sculptures he exhibited have been preserved; one of them is Carpenter; another, untitled but mentioned as Peasant head, is in a Spanish private collection; the two othe, Suprematist relief with volume elements and The music, are at the Tretiakov Gallery in Moscow. 

The title alludes to the trade of Kliun’s father. The teeth and the saw are similar to the same elements in other works by the artist: the paintings Self-portrait with a saw, from about 1914 (Tretiakov State Galley, Moscow), and Cubo-futurist head of a man with a saw, from 1914 (Astrakhanskiy Museum, Astrakhan), and the drawing on paper Portrait of Kazimir Malevich, his best friend, from about 1914 (private collection). Ironically, Kazimir Malevich’s paintings Portrait of Ivan Kliun, from 1911, and Perfected portrait of Ivan Vasilievich Kliun, from 1913, represent Kliun with saws. It is almost as if his father’s trade would have marked his image.

Ivan Vasilievich Kliun gave it in the 1920s to Elisaweta Orechova, dancer of the Sergei Diaghilev’s Russian Ballets before 1927. Orechova’s daughter, Irena Voutke, sold it in 1992 to a Dutch private collector. The sculpture is accompanied by a radiocarbon dating report, issued by the Institut Royal du Patrimoine Artistique, Brussels.

 

2 Ernest Trova (American, 1927-2009)
Falling Man (Series No. 89), 1963, acrylic on canvas
CRP224

Born in Clayton (Missouri). Self-taught painter and sculptor, at the age of 20 he won first prize at the Missouri Exhibition with his partially dripped Roman Boy painting; Life magazine dedicated a page to him. He was influenced by Willem de Kooning and the poet Ezra Pound, but he was not attached to any movement. In 1964 he created his most famous series, The falling man. His imperfect and vulnerable man, armless and pot-bellied, appears in sculptures, paintings and engravings. He exhibited in different editions of the Whitney and Venice Biennials, and at Documenta in Kassel (Germany). In 1969, the New York Times proclaimed him one of the best modern American sculptors. His work is shown at the MoMA, the Guggenheim and the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York); the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and the Tate Modern in London. For more than 20 years he was represented in the famous Pace Gallery (New York); in 1984 he left it and began taking a series of erroneous decisions–aimed at making mass and commercial productions of his works–that led him to a final stage of decadence and oblivion.

 

3 Arturo Casanova (Italian, 1966)
Torre mística (polyptych of 24 elements), 2008-17, oil on canvas and ink on paper mounted on canvas 
CRP301

Born in Caserta (Campania, Italy). Self-taught, he began with figuration in the early 90s, but since 1995 he has focused on creating abstract monochrome pieces, with a predilection for blue. He developed painting, photography, sculpture, installation, design and video art to express transcendent realities, close to the mystical experience, “the sacred dimension of art as opposed to any superficial decorative attraction (…) offering the viewer an experience of calm and prayer”, as critic Barbara Rose points out. In 2003 he participated in the XIV Quadriennale d’Arte di Roma; in 2004, in Monocromos: de Malevich al presente at the Reina Sofía Museum (Madrid); in 2005 he presented his work at the MACIA Museum in San José (Costa Rica); in 2011 he represented his country at the 54th Venice Biennale with the monumental bronze piece L’elmo di Fieramosca, which was later installed in Piazza Umberto I in Capua, the city where the artist lives and works.

 

ROOM 5

 

4 Rossella Vasta (Italian, 1962) 
Holzwege (octaptych), Graal, 1997, oil on canvas
CRP288

She was born in Palermo (Italy), but her family soon moved to Umbria. She is a self-taught artist. In 1987 she graduated in Philosophy from the University of Perugia; her thesis was entitled “Visual Education for the Development of the Creative Personality”. She lived in the USA for a few years, and in 1997 presented her artistic work in the Palazzo della Penna in Perugia along with other creators. In 1999 she went to Germany and created a series of works in the Cistercian abbey of Marienstatt, that would later be exhibited in the Museum of Bochum. In 2003 she won the first prize for painting at the Florence Biennale. An academic and member of the Board of Directors of the Pietro Vannucci Academy of Fine Arts in Perugia, her work has been exhibited in galleries and museums inside and outside Italy. Her best-known work was Table of silence, conceived in 2007. It consists of one hundred ceramic plates that are repeated like a mantra and encourage us to reflect on the fact that we all share the same space on earth and are invited to the same table. The piece has been exhibited in different countries, in collaboration with artists from each country, who become hosts.

 

5 Arturo Casanova (Italian, 1966)
Famiglia Modigliani, omaggio ad Amedeo, 2009, marble
CRP302

Born in Caserta (Campania, Italy). Self-taught, he began with figuration in the early 90s, but since 1995 he has focused on creating abstract monochrome pieces, with a predilection for blue. He developed painting, photography, sculpture, installation, design and video art to express transcendent realities, close to the mystical experience, “the sacred dimension of art as opposed to any superficial decorative attraction (…) offering the viewer an experience of calm and prayer”, as critic Barbara Rose points out. In 2003 he participated in the XIV Quadriennale d’Arte di Roma; in 2004, in Monocromos: de Malevich al presente at the Reina Sofía Museum (Madrid); in 2005 he presented his work at the MACIA Museum in San José (Costa Rica); in 2011 he represented his country at the 54th Venice Biennale with the monumental bronze piece L’elmo di Fieramosca, which was later installed in Piazza Umberto I in Capua, the city where the artist lives and works.

ROOMS 4 and 5

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 4 with the Falling Man by Ernest Trova.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Arturo Casanova, Famiglia Modigliani, omaggio ad Amedeo.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Rossella Vasta, Holzwege (poliptych).

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Rossella Vasta, Holzwege (poliptych).

ROOM 4

 

1 Ivan Kliun (Russian, 1873-1943)
Carpenter, 1915, assemblage
CRP046

He was born in Bol’shiye Gorki and began his artistic education in Kiev. In Moscow he attended the private studios of Rerberg, Fisher and Ilia Mashkov. In 1910 he came into contact with the Union of Youth and took part in its last exhibition (St Petersburg, 1913-1914); at that time he began to work in three dimensions with sculptures and reliefs inspired by Cubo-Futurism, such as Landscape Rushing By. He befriended Malevich and Matiushin; in 1915 he supported Suprematism. He collaborated in Malevich’s magazine and participated in several important exhibitions: Tram V (Petrograd, 1915), 0.10 (Petrograd, 1916), The Storeroom (Moscow, 1916) and Jack of Diamonds (Moscow 1916). In 1918 he collaborated in the decoration of Moscow for the first anniversary of the Revolution. From 1918 to 1921 he directed the Central Office of Exhibitions of the Government Department of Fine Arts; at the same time he gave classes in the Free Art Studies of the State and in the VKhUTEMAs (Higher Artistic and Technical Workshops of the State) in Moscow. In 1924 he joined the Four Arts group, which marked his departure from Suprematism in the mid-twenties, moving towards a figurative style characterised by its similarity to Ozenfant and Le Corbusier. His works can be seen at MoMA, the Los Angeles County Museum and the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid.  

The work, signed, dated and inscribed in the right side, with the title (Pilshchik, sawyer) in Cyrilic (ПИъщик / I. Kliun 1915), is made up by found objects made of natural and painted wood, metal and painted metal. Kliun was the son of a carpenter from Bolshiye Gorki, a hamlet close to Moscow. He exhibited his sculpture for the first time at 0.10: The last Futurist exhibition. As far as we know, only four of the 16 sculptures he exhibited have been preserved; one of them is Carpenter; another, untitled but mentioned as Peasant head, is in a Spanish private collection; the two othe, Suprematist relief with volume elements and The music, are at the Tretiakov Gallery in Moscow. 

The title alludes to the trade of Kliun’s father. The teeth and the saw are similar to the same elements in other works by the artist: the paintings Self-portrait with a saw, from about 1914 (Tretiakov State Galley, Moscow), and Cubo-futurist head of a man with a saw, from 1914 (Astrakhanskiy Museum, Astrakhan), and the drawing on paper Portrait of Kazimir Malevich, his best friend, from about 1914 (private collection). Ironically, Kazimir Malevich’s paintings Portrait of Ivan Kliun, from 1911, and Perfected portrait of Ivan Vasilievich Kliun, from 1913, represent Kliun with saws. It is almost as if his father’s trade would have marked his image.

Ivan Vasilievich Kliun gave it in the 1920s to Elisaweta Orechova, dancer of the Sergei Diaghilev’s Russian Ballets before 1927. Orechova’s daughter, Irena Voutke, sold it in 1992 to a Dutch private collector. The sculpture is accompanied by a radiocarbon dating report, issued by the Institut Royal du Patrimoine Artistique, Brussels.

 

2 Ernest Trova (American, 1927-2009)
Falling Man (Series No. 89), 1963, acrylic on canvas
CRP224

Born in Clayton (Missouri). Self-taught painter and sculptor, at the age of 20 he won first prize at the Missouri Exhibition with his partially dripped Roman Boy painting; Life magazine dedicated a page to him. He was influenced by Willem de Kooning and the poet Ezra Pound, but he was not attached to any movement. In 1964 he created his most famous series, The falling man. His imperfect and vulnerable man, armless and pot-bellied, appears in sculptures, paintings and engravings. He exhibited in different editions of the Whitney and Venice Biennials, and at Documenta in Kassel (Germany). In 1969, the New York Times proclaimed him one of the best modern American sculptors. His work is shown at the MoMA, the Guggenheim and the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York); the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and the Tate Modern in London. For more than 20 years he was represented in the famous Pace Gallery (New York); in 1984 he left it and began taking a series of erroneous decisions–aimed at making mass and commercial productions of his works–that led him to a final stage of decadence and oblivion.

 

3 Arturo Casanova (Italian, 1966)
Torre mística (polyptych of 24 elements), 2008-17, oil on canvas and ink on paper mounted on canvas 
CRP301

Born in Caserta (Campania, Italy). Self-taught, he began with figuration in the early 90s, but since 1995 he has focused on creating abstract monochrome pieces, with a predilection for blue. He developed painting, photography, sculpture, installation, design and video art to express transcendent realities, close to the mystical experience, “the sacred dimension of art as opposed to any superficial decorative attraction (…) offering the viewer an experience of calm and prayer”, as critic Barbara Rose points out. In 2003 he participated in the XIV Quadriennale d’Arte di Roma; in 2004, in Monocromos: de Malevich al presente at the Reina Sofía Museum (Madrid); in 2005 he presented his work at the MACIA Museum in San José (Costa Rica); in 2011 he represented his country at the 54th Venice Biennale with the monumental bronze piece L’elmo di Fieramosca, which was later installed in Piazza Umberto I in Capua, the city where the artist lives and works.

 

ROOM 5

4 Rossella Vasta (Italian, 1962) 
Holzwege (octaptych), Graal, 1997, oil on canvas
CRP288

She was born in Palermo (Italy), but her family soon moved to Umbria. She is a self-taught artist. In 1987 she graduated in Philosophy from the University of Perugia; her thesis was entitled “Visual Education for the Development of the Creative Personality”. She lived in the USA for a few years, and in 1997 presented her artistic work in the Palazzo della Penna in Perugia along with other creators. In 1999 she went to Germany and created a series of works in the Cistercian abbey of Marienstatt, that would later be exhibited in the Museum of Bochum. In 2003 she won the first prize for painting at the Florence Biennale. An academic and member of the Board of Directors of the Pietro Vannucci Academy of Fine Arts in Perugia, her work has been exhibited in galleries and museums inside and outside Italy. Her best-known work was Table of silence, conceived in 2007. It consists of one hundred ceramic plates that are repeated like a mantra and encourage us to reflect on the fact that we all share the same space on earth and are invited to the same table. The piece has been exhibited in different countries, in collaboration with artists from each country, who become hosts.

 

5 Arturo Casanova (Italian, 1966)
Famiglia Modigliani, omaggio ad Amedeo, 2009, marble
CRP302

Born in Caserta (Campania, Italy). Self-taught, he began with figuration in the early 90s, but since 1995 he has focused on creating abstract monochrome pieces, with a predilection for blue. He developed painting, photography, sculpture, installation, design and video art to express transcendent realities, close to the mystical experience, “the sacred dimension of art as opposed to any superficial decorative attraction (…) offering the viewer an experience of calm and prayer”, as critic Barbara Rose points out. In 2003 he participated in the XIV Quadriennale d’Arte di Roma; in 2004, in Monocromos: de Malevich al presente at the Reina Sofía Museum (Madrid); in 2005 he presented his work at the MACIA Museum in San José (Costa Rica); in 2011 he represented his country at the 54th Venice Biennale with the monumental bronze piece L’elmo di Fieramosca, which was later installed in Piazza Umberto I in Capua, the city where the artist lives and works.

CLOISTER

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Roberto Caracciolo, Teresa de Lisieux.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Juan Garaizábal, West gate of the Bohemian church, Berlin, nerve of steel.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Juan Garaizabal, West Gate of the Bohemian Church, Berlin.

CLOISTER

 

1, 2 and 3 Roberto Caracciolo (Italian, 1960)
Teresa de Ávila, Teresa de Lisieux, Juan de la Cruz, 2019, glased ceramic
CRP390

Born in New York, he lives and works in Rome. He studied at the Urbino Art Institute and at the Studio School in New York; in the early 80s he worked as an assistant stage designer with Dante Ferreti. He has been a professor or lecturer at the Academies of Fine Arts and other institutions in Turin, Perugia, Siena, Venice, New York, Chicago, Rome and Montecastello di Vibio. Between 1999 and 2013 he was adjunct professor at New York University in Florence; between 2007 and 2010, Arts Liaison at the American Academy in Rome, where he organised exhibitions.

 

4 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Miss Him, 2013, cedar and iron
CRP349

Born in Lyon (France). In 1995 she graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where she has lived and worked since 1989. Her sculptures are mainly made of wood and bronze; they are monumental pieces, often evoking sensuality and violence. She also uses iron, paper and painted glass beads. Her works and installations, as indicated on her website, “speak with delicacy and strength of a world that is not what it seems and where her sculptures come to life gradually to tell a story that leaves no one unmoved”. She began exhibiting in 1996 and since then her production has regularly been shown in galleries and museums in Belgium, Paris, Geneva and Lyon. In 2005, after overcoming cancer, her sculpture depicted vital organs such as the heart, and she created a “crying machine”. Until 2011 she taught classical sculpture at her academy La ligne d’horizon.

 

5 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Woman, 2012, cedar and iron 
CRP345

6 Juan Garaizábal (Spanish, 1971)
West gate of the Bohemian church, Berlin, nerve of steel, 2011, iron
CRP343

Born in Madrid. Dedicated to conceptual art, sculpture and engraving. Also drawing, video art and light and sound installations. He is known internationally for his monumental public sculptures. With his project Urban Memories he aimed to recover lost architectural elements using sculptural structures and light. He studied drawing at IB67 and then at CESEM (Reims). He currently works between Berlin and Madrid developing his conceptual interventions in public spaces. He completes most of the work required by his pieces himself, and has thus learnt techniques of iron and steel forging, lighting, carpentry, masonry and plastic materials. His public urban memory installations include Bucharest (2007), Berlin (2012), Venice (2013) and Miami-Havana (2016).

 

CLOISTER

View of the cloister with Mis Him, by Annabelle Hyvrier, in the foreground.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Roberto Caracciolo, Teresa de Lisieux.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Juan Garaizábal, West gate of the Bohemian church, Berlin, nerve of steel.

CLOISTER

 

1, 2 and 3 Roberto Caracciolo (Italian, 1960)
Teresa de Ávila, Teresa de Lisieux, Juan de la Cruz, 2019, glased ceramic
CRP390

Born in New York, he lives and works in Rome. He studied at the Urbino Art Institute and at the Studio School in New York; in the early 80s he worked as an assistant stage designer with Dante Ferreti. He has been a professor or lecturer at the Academies of Fine Arts and other institutions in Turin, Perugia, Siena, Venice, New York, Chicago, Rome and Montecastello di Vibio. Between 1999 and 2013 he was adjunct professor at New York University in Florence; between 2007 and 2010, Arts Liaison at the American Academy in Rome, where he organised exhibitions.

 

4 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Miss Him, 2013, cedar and iron
CRP349

Born in Lyon (France). In 1995 she graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where she has lived and worked since 1989. Her sculptures are mainly made of wood and bronze; they are monumental pieces, often evoking sensuality and violence. She also uses iron, paper and painted glass beads. Her works and installations, as indicated on her website, “speak with delicacy and strength of a world that is not what it seems and where her sculptures come to life gradually to tell a story that leaves no one unmoved”. She began exhibiting in 1996 and since then her production has regularly been shown in galleries and museums in Belgium, Paris, Geneva and Lyon. In 2005, after overcoming cancer, her sculpture depicted vital organs such as the heart, and she created a “crying machine”. Until 2011 she taught classical sculpture at her academy La ligne d’horizon.

 

5 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Woman, 2012, cedar and iron 
CRP345

6 Juan Garaizábal (Spanish, 1971)
West gate of the Bohemian church, Berlin, nerve of steel, 2011, iron
CRP343

Born in Madrid. Dedicated to conceptual art, sculpture and engraving. Also drawing, video art and light and sound installations. He is known internationally for his monumental public sculptures. With his project Urban Memories he aimed to recover lost architectural elements using sculptural structures and light. He studied drawing at IB67 and then at CESEM (Reims). He currently works between Berlin and Madrid developing his conceptual interventions in public spaces. He completes most of the work required by his pieces himself, and has thus learnt techniques of iron and steel forging, lighting, carpentry, masonry and plastic materials. His public urban memory installations include Bucharest (2007), Berlin (2012), Venice (2013) and Miami-Havana (2016).

 

ROOM 6

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 6, with works by Rottluf, Vantongerloo, Maes and others.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Untitled.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marthe Donas, Le livre d’images.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Wassily Kandinsky, A Street in Murnau.

Georges Vantongerloo, Construction.

Georges Vantongerloo, Construction.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Eugène Delacroix, Femme de pêcheur à la plage.

 

ROOM 6

 

1 Joszef Rippl-Ronai (Hungarian, 1861-1927)
Les Jardins du Luxembourg, c. 1898, wool embroidery shaded in oil paint on canvas
CRP016

Born in Kaposvár (Hungary). In 1884 he went to Munich, like many artists from his country, did before gravitating towards Paris to study painting, and in 1886 to the French capital, where he was a disciple of Munkácsy, the most outstanding Hungarian Realist. In 1888 he was influenced by Les Nabis. He returned to Hungary, where an important exhibition of his output from 1890-1900 was held. He exhibited in Germany and Austria with great success. He also designed interiors, furniture and stained-glass windows. His paintings are held at the National Gallery of Hungary (Budapest), the National Gallery of Washington, the Musée d’Orsay, the MoMA and the museums of Cleveland and Chicago.

Monogram R bottom right.

Rippl-Ronai was a close friend of Aristide Maillol, who made some embroideries before becoming a sculptor. Maillol gave up embroidery because it left him blind several months. Inspired by Maillol’s embroideries, Rippl-Ronai used to draw in ink on the back of the canvas, subsequently embroidered by his wife. Maillol’s influence is obvious in the use of point lancé by Rippl-Ronai; however, Rippl-Ronai’s points lancés, often highlighted with oil painting, are made in wool and not in silk, tighter and flatter than Maillol’s. This emphasizes the decorative and artisanal character of his embroidered pictures. Maillol and Rippl-Ronai visited the Cluny museum in Paris together so as to admire the Spanish Renaissance tapestries, made in point lancé. Unlike to Maillol’s delicate colours and subtil contrasts, Rippl-Ronai’s colours are brilliant and his contrasts marked, which adds to his decorative and artisanal appearance even more.

Just like his paintings from around 1910, the style of Rippl-Ronai’s embroidered pictures is characterized by their green, yellow, red and mauve tones, separated by black or brown; he used colours markedly contrasted that he didn’t dare use in his paintings of the time -the bright reds of his embroidered pictures contrast strongly with his yellows, greens and blacks- even if he will use them a decade later in paintings like Je peins Lazarine et Anelle au jardin, Hepi et les autres ont chaud and Ambiance d’été au jardin de la villa Roma, of around 1910. The colours composition of his embroidered pictures is the following: green is the dominant colour, yellow the secondary one, red the tertiary one and mauve the analogous. The background of these works is always green (trees) and yellow (the light that filters among them).

 

2 Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798-1863)
La femme du pêcheur à la plage, c. 1843-45, /oil on canvas
CRP002

The greatest of the French Romantic painters, his use of colour influenced the development of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Born in Charenton-Saint-Maurice, near Paris, he studied under the famous academic painter Guérin and admired Rubens, Raphael, the Venetians and his English contemporaries. Inspired by historical and contemporary events, as well as literature, he was a great reader and friend of famous writers. In 1825 he went to London and established a relationship with English painters; English literature also provided him with subjects. In 1831 he received the Legion of Honour; his most famous painting, Liberty Leading the People, was acquired by the State and exhibited in the Salon with great success. In 1832 he travelled to Morocco accompanying the French ambassador; he discovered the Orient with its light and colours and the experience inspired exotic scenes for the rest of his life. In 1839 he travelled to the Netherlands and studied Rubens in depth. For three decades he executed numerous decorative cycles in official buildings and churches, while continuing to send works to the Salon.

The signature “E.D.” is used on occasion by the artist those years, his fame being perfectly consolidated; previously he preferred a most complete form. The title reproduces that of a work at the Mesdag Museum (The Hague) attributed to Jean-François Millet, probably after as subject by Delacroix; it was bought from an art dealer prior to1886 and has been assigned various dates between 1848 and 1855-60. The connection with Millet comes from a loan of the work by the Mesdag Museum in 1887; it is described as “an old woman sitting on a rock beholding the sea terrified”. It could be a preparatory sketch for a bigger picture; the small size and the sketch-like and expressionist making fit in with the numerous works of the kind he made all his life. Claude Monet refers to this modality in a letter written in 1859: “They are only hints, sketches, but they, as always, have fire and movement”. The laboratory analysis confirmed a date after 1850 and that the colours match up with with those used by Delacroix.

A certain similarity with Michelangelo’s Sybils in the Sixtine Chapel has attracted the attention; indeed, her pose and proportions make her similar above all to the Persic one; with all of them she shares the mannerist canon with a elongated and powerful body a a small head. It is one more demostration of his permanent classical vocation and his admiration for the old masters.

 

3 Dante Gabriel Rossetti (English,1828-1882) & William Morris (English,1834-1896)
The Owl Chair, 1856, natural and painted kapur
CRP004

Rossetti, born in London, was a member of an Anglo-Italian family of writers; he himself was a painter and poet and in 1848 founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, an artistic movement that idealised the Middle Ages. In his youth he was an informal disciple of Ford Madox Brown, who transmitted to him his admiration for the Nazarenes, the German Pre-Raphaelites, and aimed to recover the purity of pre-Renaissance art along with William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and others; he combined painting, poetry and social idealism. The ritual and ornamentation of the Gothic period had a profound influence on him. In 1854 he achieved a powerful patron, art critic John Ruskin, but by then the group had broken apart. Later, with Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris, he began a second phase of the movement, marked by enthusiasm for a legendary past and the ambition to reform applied arts, advocating for the arts to include crafts. With Morris as their driving spirit, they designed stained-glass windows, bookbindings, wallpapers, embroidery and furniture.

Morris was born in Walthamstow, near London; a designer, craftsman, poet and Socialist pioneer, his designs of decorative arts pieces revolutionised Victorian taste. In his youth he worked with G. E. Street, one of the architects of the Gothic Revival movement; under the influence of Dante Gabriel Rossetti he abandoned architecture for painting. In 1861, with Ford Madox Brown, Rossetti, Burne-Jones and others, he founded Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company, an association of “fine art workers”, to make furniture, fabrics, stained glass windows, wallpaper, etc.; in 1874, the company was restructured as Morris & Company. In 1883 he began to travel through industrial areas to spread Socialism; he founded the Socialist League and later the Socialist Society of Hammersmith. In 1891 the Kelmscott Press began to operate; it printed magnificent books with typography designed by Morris and inspired by medieval sources.

It was in the appartament Morris shared with Burne-Jones on 17 Lion Square, Bloomsbury (London). At the Victoria & Albert Museum in London there are two chairs very similar to this one, dated in 1856, the year Rossetti’s frienship with Morris and Burne-Jones, then students in Oxford, began, and the start of the second stage of the Pre-Rafaelite Brotherhood. Morris made pieces of furniture on designs by Rossetti and by Burne-Jones; these chairs match a kind of solid and rural-like, reminiscent of the Middle Ages. They wanted to market them at low prices so as everybody would have access to them. With Rossetti he also created a fine armchair with reed seat.

 

4 Georges Lacombe (French, 1868-1916)
Portrait de Marie Lacombe et de ses filles, 1907-08, wood
CRP031

Born in Versailles into a wealthy family, he didn’t need to live off art and didn’t sell his paintings. He was a painter and sculptor; he studied with Henri Gervex and Alfred Philippe Roll at the Académie Julian. Above all, he admired Gauguin; his work was symbolic and reminiscent of Japanese prints. He spent summers on the coast of Brittany; he established a relationship with Les Nabis, who were very interested in Gauguin and in the search for a pictorial language that was more expressive in form and colour. He painted scenes of Brittany and the sea. Around 1893 he met Gauguin and began to carve simple wooden sculptures. His work can be found at the Musée d’Orsay, the National Gallery of Washington, the Cortauld Institute, the Norton Simon collection and the museums of Indianapolis, Quimper and Rennes.

Exhibited in 1908 at the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris.

 

5 Armand Point (French,1860/61-1932)
Armoire, c. 1892, lime with brass mounts
CRP014

Born in Algiers. He was a Symbolist painter, engraver and designer. He first painted Orientalist scenes of Algeria; in 1888 he went to Paris and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts with Auguste Herst and Fernand Cormon. From 1890 onwards he exhibited at the National Society of Fine Arts. He was influenced by Ruskin and the Pre-Raphaelites, and was a member of the first Nabi group. He travelled to Italy and saw Botticelli’s Primavera; Botticelli and Leonardo made a great impression on him and he set out to resurrect the art of the 15th and 16th centuries. Later he became a full-fledged Symbolist; in 1896-1901 he lived in Marlotte and founded the Haute-Claire workshop, not far from the headquarters of the Barbizon school. At the turn of the century he became increasingly interested in the decorative arts and aimed to emulate William Morris.

Carved by sculptor Charles Virion (1865-1946) after a design by Point. It was in the designer’s bedroom. On a leg of the bed that is part of the bedroom furniture the signature “AP” appears, with the letters intertwined. Point designed it, for his personal use, at the Association de la Haute Claire de Marlotte, in the Forest of Fontainebleau. Drawing on William Morris’ Red House, Point founded the Association de la Haute Claire in 1892; it was the first artists colony in continental Europe created for the purpose of producing decorative art works designed by an artist. Point surrounded himself with craftsmen who transcribed his drawings on metal, enamel, wood and other media, often emplying forgotten Italian Renaissance techniques Exhibited in 2006-09 at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs of Paris.

 

6 Eduard Bick (Swiss, 1883-1947)
Stehendes Mädchen, c. 1900, stained ash tree wood
CRP021

Born in Wil (Switzerland), he was a sculptor, draftsman and graphic artist; he worked in Zurich and Sant’Abbondio, where the foundation that bears his name was created upon his death. He was the son of a goldsmith and learned this trade. In 1906 he entered the Kunstakademie in Munich; in 1908 he moved to Rome and began to devote himself to sculpture. Between 1910 and 1914 he lived in Berlin, but spent seasons in Italy. When the war broke out he returned to Wil and then to Berlin; in 1919 he returned definitively to Switzerland; he settled in Zurich, where he died.

Provenance: the estate of Odette Valabregue Wurzburger (French, born in Avignon and dead in Cleveland in 2006), a philantropist and Law teacher, co-founder of the Cleveland International Piano Competition, and a decorated member of the French Resistance. A similar wooden, with the same title and date and 79.5 cm high, was given by baron August Freiherr von der Heydt to the Weimar Fine Arts Museum. The Von der Heydt Museum in Wuppertal keeps one similar sculpture, documented and reproduced in the sculpture catalogo of this museum.

 

7 William Degouve de Nuncques (French, 1857-1935)
Romeo y Julieta, 1899, oil on canvas
CRP020

Born in Monthermé (Ardennes, France); his family settled in Belgium. A self-taught painter, he came into contact with the Belgian Symbolist poets and belonged to the group Les XX. He travelled a great deal and painted views of Italy, Austria and France; his parks at night are very representative of his style, transmitting the atmosphere of magic and mystery of his works; it has been said that he influenced Surrealism, especially in the case of Magritte. From 1900 to 1902 he lived in the Balearic Islands, painting landscapes. His works can be found at the Musée d’Orsay, the Kröller-Müller de Otterlo and the Musée d’Orsay in Brussels.

Also entitled The lovers. The artist is almost unknown in Spain but enjoys celebrity in the sphere of Central European Symbolism. He draw inspiration in French Symbolist poets like Stéphane Mallarmé and Rémy de Gourmont, but above all in Belgian Symbolist poet and novelist Georges Rodenbach. Very representative of his style are his mysterious images of houses and forest views, and mainly his parks by night with streetlamps projecting enigmatic shadows, like The pink house (1892), which convey the atmosphere of magic and mystery of his works; it has been said that he influenced on Surrealism, mainly on Magritte, four decades his junior, with his light effects.

 

8 Henri Edmond Cross (French,1856-1910)
Vue de Gravelines (nord), vu du Grand-Fort-Philippe, c. 1891, oil on canvas
CRP012

Born in Douai (France). The first time he exhibited at the Salon, in 1881, he changed his surname, Delacroix, to the English form Cross so as not to be confused with Eugène Delacroix; at first he used only the name Henri but then he used Henri-Edmond to avoid confusion with the sculptor Henri Cross. He studied in Lille with Alphonse Colas. In 1884 he was one of the founders of the Society of Independent Artists. His influence from Seurat and Signac made him a disciple of Pointillism. He was initially inspired by Manet and the Impressionists, but in 1891 he produced his first Neo-Impressionist work. He settled in the south of France, where he painted harbours and scenes of peasant life from a point of view close to anarchism. In the mid-1890s, he and Signac abandoned coloured dots for a technique resembling mosaic, an important step towards the development of Fauvism. His work can be found at the Hermitage, the Musée d’Orsay, the Metropolitan and the Thyssen in Madrid, and in the museums of Chicago, San Francisco, Cologne, etc.

The approximate date of this painting, 1891, marks the turning point in the artist’s life and style: Seurat dies in March; he had spent his last summer in Gravelines, close to Dunquerque, painting landscapes and planning The circus, his last work. When his Bathers at Asnières were rejected by the jury of the Salon in 1884, Seurat decided to found the Société des Artistes Indépendents with his friends. The following year the divisionism or pointillism is fully formulated and some artists apart from Cross join it: Signac, Dubois-Pillet, Maximilian Luce or Belgian Van Rysselberghe, besides Pissarro, temporally; it attracts Gauguin, Van Gogh and Regoyos’ attention as well.

Also in 1891 he makes his first pointillist work, a portrait of his wife, and for health reasons he settled permanently in the South, firstly in Cabassa and later in Saint-Clair, close to Saint-Tropez, where Signac used to goes. This one, the main representative of the movement after the early passing of ts creator, was a great traveller and painted the French harbours. That of Gravelines, in Cross’ luminous and colorist vision, is a excellent demonstration of how the artist from Douai interpreted such a rigurous style; he, using bigger points and a glowing chromatism, exerced an influence in the beginnings of Fauvism on Matisse, Derain y Braque’s work. If the date assigned to this painting is right, it means that it was ahead of this subsequent development.

 

9 Wassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944)
A Street in Murnau, c. 1908, oil on hardboard
CRP032

Born in Moscow, after learning music and painting, he studied law and economics at Moscow University, where he taught after 1892. He discovered Rembrandt, the Impressionists and Wagner and decided to devote himself to painting. He moved to Munich and studied with the painter Anton Azbe and at the Academy. In 1902 he exhibited for the first time with the Berliner Sezession and in 1904 at the Salon d’Automne in Paris. He was inspired by the music of Arnold Schönberg and the texts of Wilhelm Worringer. Alongside Franz Marc he founded the Expressionist group Der Blaue Reiter; in 1911 they held their first exhibition at the Tannhäuser gallery in Munich. During these years he chose the path of pure abstraction; his theoretical ideas are found in texts such as Concerning the Spiritual in Art and Point and Line To Plane. In 1914 he moved to Switzerland and then to Moscow; in 1917 he became a member of the People’s Commissariat for Education. When Socialist Realism was imposed, he returned to Germany and taught at the Bauhaus, which the Nazis closed in 1933; his art was considered “degenerate” and he fled to Paris; in Neuilly-sur-Seine he reverted to the free abstraction of his early years. His work can be found in major museums such as MoMA and the Guggenheim in New York, the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Nue Pinakothek in Munich, the Ludwig in Cologne, and the Trétiakov Gallery.

In the summer of 1908 Kandinsky and his partner, the painter Gabriele Münter, discover Murnau, not far from Munich; it will be for him an earthly paradise and the place where he will revise his artistic approach, which very soon will lead him to pure abstraction. The following year they buy a house, where they will spend some periods until 1914. In his repeated stays he paints many small oil sketches of Murnau, generally, like here, a broad street in perspective to the background with bright and contrasted colours, or country roads.

 

10 Hermann Max Pechstein (German, 1881-1955)
Portrait of Charlotte Kaprolat, c. 1909, oil on linen
CRP033

A painter and engraver; an outstanding member of the German expressionist group Die Brücke and known above all for his nudes and landscapes. Born in Zwickau (Germany); in 1900 he went to study in Dresden. In 1906 he joined Die Brücke; this and his knowledge of Matisse’s works led him to use discordant, highly emotive colour combinations. In 1910 he became one of the founders of the Berlin Neue Sezession. In 1914 he travelled to the South Pacific, where he painted exotic subjects in a Primitivist style. Back in Germany, he designed stained glass windows and mosaics and held a teaching position in Berlin. He was forced to resign when the Nazis declared his work “decadent”; he would not work again until after the war.

It is a work very representative of the changes art undergoes at the turn of the century and specifically of German expressionism, replacing the objective representation of reality with the artist’s experience, its expression and its effect on the beholder. The year 1909 was key in Pechstein’s evolution with his first trip to Nidden (Baltic): in contact with nature, he creates freely and his style comes to fruition; those years mean the culmination of his art, which melts shape, colour and expression. It is as well a fundamental date because it marks the beginning of the height of Die Brücke, which receives the decisive encouragement of Fauvism.

 

11 Jean-Jacques Gailliard (Belgian, 1890-1976)
Le Paradis cramoisi, 1917, oil on canvas
CRP065

Born in Brussels. He was a painter, draughtsman, engraver, lithographer and sculptor; he was one of the first Belgian abstract artists. In 1912 he was seduced by the mystical theses of Swedish theosophist Swedenborg and converted to the New Jerusalem Church. Since 1923 he took part in the exhibitions of La Lanterne Sourde, 7 Arts and Les Peintres Constructeurs; in 1924 he taught drawing at the Institut des Arts et Métiers in Brussels; in 1925 he founded the group L’Assaut alongside Flouquet and others. In 1971 he was elected member of the Academy of Sciences, Language and Fine Arts of Belgium, Plastic Arts department. He painted urban views, landscapes, seascapes, portraits, nudes and still lifes; his work can be found in museums in Belgium and also in the United States, Israel, France and Ireland.

Provenance: Queen Elisabeth of Belgium; from her it passed to Dr. Kyriakidis, European representative of Greece in Brussels. The back bears the label RE (Queen Elisabeth) and the hand-written inventory number 945.

 

12 Georges Vantongerloo (Belgian,1886-1965)
Box, c. 1916-25, exterior in oil paint on primed cardboard, interior lined with paper
CRP057

Born in Antwerp, he was the most famous Belgian pioneer of abstract painting and sculpture. He studied at the Academies of Fine Arts in Antwerp and Brussels. From 1914 to 1918 he lived in the Netherlands; in 1917 he exhibited at the Cercle Hollando-Belge. He would later create purely geometric abstract works; although his grid-like compositions may appear arbitrary, they are determined by mathematical relationships. He then met the Belgian futurist Schmalzigaug and Mondrian, Van der Leck and Van Doesburg. In 1924 he published his pamphlet L’Art et son avenir. In 1931 he exhibited at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and was elected vice-president of the association of avant-garde artists Abstraction-Création. In 1936 he took part in the exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art at the MoMA. He exhibited with Bill and Antoine Pevsner at the Kunsthaus in Zurich in 1949. He celebrated his 75th birthday with a solo exhibition at the Suzanne Bollag Gallery in Zurich; in 1962 an extensive retrospective was presented at the new Marlborough Gallery in London; since then there have been many others. His work can be seen in countless public collections: the Art Institute of Chicago, the Groeningemuseum in Bruges, Kröller-Müller in Otterlo, the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Berardo Collection in Lisbon, MoMA in New York, the Fine Arts Museum of Ghent, the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels, the Guggenheim in New York and the Tate Modern in London.

Provenance: Louis E. Stern, prestigious American collector and philanthropist, born in Russia. His Louis E. Stern Foundation choose the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1962 to house a part of his collection. Stern was a member of the board of directors of this museum from 1950 until his death.

The box was inherited by Stern’s sister and later by successive members of her family.

 

13 Georges Vantongerloo (Belgian,1886-1965)
Construction, c. 1917, teak
CRP058

 

14 Edmond van Dooren (Belgian, 1896-1965)
Impression de ville, Londres 1919, oil on canvas
CRP062

A painter and graphic designer, born in Antwerp. In 1911 he entered the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, where he surprised with his daring use of colour. His first works, from 1914, are Impressionist landscapes en plein air. But he was more interested in form than content; in the Academy he befriended Jozef Peeters and in 1916-1919 they found a shared passion for depicting futuristic metropolises, in paintings prefiguring the images of the film Metropolis by Fritz Lang (1927). They also developed a kind of Symbolist and Romantic style related to their worship of Wagner’s music. Influenced by Robert Delaunay, Van Dooren’s work became increasingly abstract. In 1918 he founded with Peeters the Modern Art group, with the participation of Cockx, Léonard and Maes; they made contact with Der Sturm and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He used the linocut technique, which favours geometric abstraction. However, his art evolved towards visions of a futuristic utopia, often suggesting a worship of machines. His futuristic imagery prefigured many Spielberg films. He exhibited in Breda and Antwerp (1956 and 1963), and since the 1970s his work has been included in numerous exhibitions on the Belgian avant-garde, including Modernisme. L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe (Ghent Fine Arts Museum, 2013). His works can be seen in this museum and in Antwerp, among others.

 

15 Gustav Wunderwald (German, 1882-1945)
Grunewaldstrasse, Berlin-Westend, 1918, oil on canvas
CRP096

Born in Cologne. He began as an apprentice with Wilhelm Kuhn; in 1899-1900 he worked painting sets for many theatres in Germany and abroad, and for the Berlin Opera. After World War I he settled in Berlin; he painted scenes of life in the neighbourhoods of this city in the New Objectivity style. In 1927 he began to exhibit urban scenes and landscapes, but had to stop with the rise to power of the Nazis; he survived by colouring films. Once the war was over, he did not have the opportunity to return to his profession, as he died from drinking contaminated water in the chaos of 1945 Berlin.

 

16 Karl Schmidt-Rottluff (German, 1884-1976)
Untitled, 1910-11, textile
CRP034

A painter and engraver celebrated for his expressionist landscapes and engravings, he was born in Rottluff (Saxony, Germany) and began studying architecture in Dresden, where he met Kirchner and Heckel. In 1905 both moved to Dresden to study and paint; together they formed the expressionist group Die Brücke and presented their first exhibition in Leipzig. He added ‘Rottluff’ to his name, which was the name of his native town. In works such as Windy Day (1907) the transition from his early style can be seen, to the mature style of his works such as Self Portrait with Monocle (1910), characterised by daring dissonant colours. In 1911 he moved to Berlin; numerous works from this period reveal his new interest in Cubism. When the Nazis came to power he was forbidden from painting and expelled from the Prussian Academy of Arts; in 1937 many of his paintings were removed from museums and some were included in the exhibition Degenerate Art. In 1947 he was hired as a professor at the University of the Arts in Berlin. Germany paid tribute to him with numerous retrospectives and in 1956 he was awarded the Pour le Mérite medal, Prussia’s highest distinction. In 1964 he was the main promoter of the Brücke Museum in Berlin, inaugurated in 1967 with the works donated by him and other members of the group. His works can be seen at the MoMA, Los Angeles County Museum, the Muscarelle Museum of Art (Williamsburg), the Museum am Theaterplatz (Chemnitz), etc.

The work was commissioned to the artist Wilhelm Niemeyer, from Hamburg, whose descendants lent it to the Landesmuseum Schleswig-Holstein until 1999; in 2008 they sold it (Christie’s, London, Old Master, Modern and Contemporary Prints); it was acquired by Ronny van de Velde, from Antwerp, who sold it in 2012 (De Vuyst, Lokeren, May 12, 2012, Oude Meesters, Moderne en Hedendaagse Kunst) to his present owner.

After being labelled as a “degenerate artist” and forbidden from artistic creation, his works were stolen by Nazi civil servants, hidden (many reappeared in the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg,where they stayed), burnt or sold in auction in Switzerland. Art historians agree that he was one of the most important German expressionists. Schmidt-Rottluff did not consider himself to be only a painter, sculptor and engraver; he was also interested in applied arts, perhaps motivated by the concept of Gesamtkunstwerk or total work of art. It was maybe during his stay in Hardanger Fiord, in Norway, in the summer of 1911, and possibly by influence of popular Norwegian art, when he created his first works of this kind; he started to exhibit them that year and the next one at a show in Cologne, one of whose organisers, Wilhelm Niemeyer -a teacher in Hamburg Kunstgewerbeschule and driving force of the modernisation of the German applied arts-, was one of the first collectors who bought works by the artist in this modality, among them this textile. Schmidt-Rottluff’s most important design project was commissioned by Rosa Schapire in 1921 for the interior of his appartement in Osterbekstrasse, Hamburg; the project, which included furniture, carpets and various wooden and metal objects, was partially confiscated and sold as “degenerate art” by the Nazi governement and partially destroyed in the bombings of the II World War.

 

17 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Construction, c. 1925, exotic wood
CRP134

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

On the back, the monogram KM, bottom right, and the wax seal of the last owner’s family upper right. Herman Maes, the artist’s grandson and trustee of his family record, has confirmed the authenticity of the work. From Karel Maes’ estate it passed to Pieter Albertyn, from Antwerp.

 

18 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled c. 1923, oil on wood panel
CRP132

Signed on the back, bottom right: KM. On the verso it bears the inscription in pencil H vd Velde.

The painting is accompanied by an authenticity certificate issued Herman Maes, the artist’s grandson. Provenance: Piet Maes, the artist’s son; inherited by Herman Maes; later, from Walter Daems, St. Truiden (Flanders), Belgium.

 

19 Georg Kolbe (German, 1877-1947)
Henry van de Velde, 1913, bronze
CRP037

Born in Waldheim (Germany), he studied at the School of Applied Arts in Dresden, then at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and spent six months at the Académie Julian in Paris. In 1898 he moved to Rome and became interested in sculpture. At the beginning of the 20th century he dedicated himself above all to the idealised nude, which he moulded and twisted, clearly influenced by Rodin and Maillol. In 1903 he settled in Berlin, becoming a member of the Sezession, and in 1913 he moved to the Freie Sezession. He volunteered for the Army in 1915, where he was commissioned to design war memorials. In 1919 he was elected a member of the Academy of Berlin. His work from the 1930s has a more heroic monumentality that attracted the Nazi elites, and he became part of the structure of the Reich Chamber of Culture.

 

20 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Le Tango, 1920, India ink on paper
CRP071

Born in Antwerp. Following the suggestion of her friend Van Doesburg, to avoid her gender colouring people’s perception of her art, she also signed works as Tour d’Onasky or Tour Donas. According to Katherine Dreier, founder of the legendary Société Anonyme, she was “Belgium’s first abstract painter”. She was educated at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp; in 1916 she studied stained glass making in Ireland. André Lothe’s exhibition in Paris introduced her to Cubism. Her first fully abstract and Post-Cubist works date from 1917. She was also a precursor of Surrealism. In 1918 she joined the famous Section D’Or in Paris, which was inspired by Cubism and Orphism. Donas’ greatest contribution to modern art is to have been the first person to push Cubism into abstraction. In 1919, Van Doesburgh published several articles on her in De Stijl, placing her among the protagonists of modern art. In 1920 she exhibited in Der Sturm, Herwarth Walden’s gallery and Berlin’s avant-garde centre; all her works were bought by Walden and Katherine Dreier, who, advised by Marcel Duchamp, gathered an impressive collection of masterpieces of the international avant-garde, the core of the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven and MoMA New York. She exhibited again at Der Sturm in 1923. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels presented a retrospective of her in 1960. Her productions have been shown at the Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent, the Von der Heydt in Wuppertal, the Belgian Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, and the Tate Modern in London. In cooperation with the Yale University Art Gallery and the Archipenko Foundation of Bearsville (New York), the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts presented a major exhibition of her work in 2016.

The artist felt intrigued by movement and the play with convex and concave shapes, by diagonals and the alternation of angular and rounded elements. All this and her fascination for dance led her in 1917 to work on the subject of tango until the complete stripping and the reduction of figures to pure geometry in 1920.

 

21 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Le Tango, Der Sturm, 1920, magazine front cover titled, signed and dated by the artist
CRP072

 

22 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Nature morte ‘K’, c. 1917-1918, oil on canvas
CRP068

 

23 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Le livre d’images, c. 1918, oil on plaster and cardboard
CRP069

Signed in oil by the artist bottom near right: Tour Donas. On the back, inscription in oil bay the artist N:16/Le livre d’images par/Tour Donas, as well as two rectangular labels in paper.

Marthe Donas met Alexander Archipenko in 1917. The revolutionary shaped paintings by Belgian artist show the influence of the Russian’s sculpture-paintings, probably inspired by Russian icons. Donas describe the technique she used in these paintings, created in his capital years 1917 and 1919, as facture épaisse en relief. However, whereas Archipenko’s sculpture-paintings, the same as the Russian icons, have conventional quadrangular backgrounds, Donas eliminates the background and so creates the first shaped paintings in the history of western art, which anticipate those of American pop art in the 1960s (Jim Dine, James Rosenquist and Tom Wesselmann). Besides, these works have the same irregular shapes of the things represented and so they become objects, object-paintings. Donas composed his painting following the silhouette of an egg, symbol of maternity, its subject.

 

24 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Adam et Eve, 1927, mixed media assemblage
CRP076

Signed an dated on the back, bottom right: Donas 1927. The artist sold it to Maurits Bilcke, famous Belgian art critic, in 1961. The Marthe Donas Foundation confirmed the authenticity and date of the painting, included by the artist in the inventory of her work for the year 1927. Her daughter, Françoise Franke van Meir, confirmed them as well and remembers having seen the work at home when she was a child.

 

25 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Nature morte à la cuillère, 1920, graphite on paper
CRP074

 

26 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Pot de Cinéraires, 1923, mixed media on panel
CRP075

Signed and dated on the back, upper right: Pot de Cinéraires/Donas/Sceaux avril 1923.

 

Edmund-Kesting,-Verschränku

Edmund Kesting, Verschränku.

Eileen Gray, Untitled.

Eileen Gray, Untitled.

El Lissittzky, Proun.

El Lissittzky, Proun.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Paul Joostens, Dada Object.

Franz Marc, Dos caballos en un paisaje.

Franz Marc, Two Horses in an Abstract Landscape.

Kurt Schwitters, Sin título.

Kurt Schwitters, Untitled.

 

 

27 Kurt Schwitters (German, 1887-1948)
Untitled, 1929, painted wood
CRP184

Born in Hannover (Germany). He studied at the Academies of Dresden and Berlin and in 1918 he exhibited his first works, Cubo-Futurist, in Der Sturm. Attracted by the nascent Dada school and rejected by the Berlin circle, he formed his own variant in Hanover; he began to create compositions with everyday waste objects; his poems were also a mixture of printed materials. He referred to all of his artistic activities–and then also to all of his daily activities and himself–as Merz, a meaningless word derived from Kommerz. In 1922 he was influenced by De Stijl and moved towards Constructivism; in 1927 he founded Die Abstrakten Hannover, together with Friedrich Vordemberge-Gildewart. In 1930 he took part in the activities of the Cercle et Carré group and in 1932 he joined Abstraction-Création. In 1937 he went to Norway; when the Nazis invaded the country he escaped to England. In his later years he combined Merz with a return to figuration. In 1994, the Kurt Schwitters Archive, an international research centre, was established in the Sprengel Museum (Hanover). His work can be found in the most important contemporary art museums in the world, such as the MoMA and the Tate Gallery in London.

 

28 Edmund Kesting (German, 1892-1970)
Verschränkungen, 1920-25, mixed media assemblage
CRP137

Born in Dresden, he was a photographer, painter and art teacher. He studied at the School of Fine Arts in Dresden, then served as a soldier in World War I. Once the war was over, he continued his training with Richard Müller and Otto Gussmann. In 1923 he held his first exhibition of photographs at the historic Der Sturm Gallery. Once established in Berlin, he got to know the avant-garde circles of the capital and tried experimental techniques; the Nazis would later include him in the “degenerate art” category. After World War II, he joined a group of artists that adopted the name “Call to an art in freedom”. He participated in the polemic over Socialist Realism and Formalism in the German Democratic Republic; his work was not exhibited until 1949-1959. In 1967 he became a professor at the Potsdam Film and Television Academy.

Dedicated and given by the artist in 1926 to Nell Rosland Walden (Berlin), a pionieer of abstract painting in Switzerland and the second wife of Herwarth Walden, the creator of the magazine Der Sturm (1910) and the homonimous gallery (1912) in Berlin, both consecrated to the new artistic tendencies.

 

29 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Composition d’après deux femmes, 1920, India ink on paper
CRP073

 

30 Jos Léonard (Belgian, 1892-1987)
Untitled, 1923, gouache and collage on paper
CRP124

Born in Antwerp. He was one of the first non-figurative artists in Belgium. His first abstract works, influenced by Art Nouveau, Cubism and Futurism, date from 1912. Later, he was influenced by De Stijl artists. He was one of the main modernists of Antwerp along with the great avant-garde poet Paul Van Ostaijen and artists such as Paul Joostens, Jozef Peeters and others. He collaborated with Joostens in the avant-garde magazines Sélection, Ça ira and Het Overzicht. After 1925 he worked as an innovative designer of books, advertising and interiors; with commissions from important publishers. His work attracted a lot of attention when it was exhibited at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in 1987. Many of his works were inspired by World War I and Arnold Schoenberg’s music; at times they represent abstract human figures with a sensitivity close to that of Archipenko, or a nocturnal and futuristic metropolis close to those of Van Dooren. In 1973 he donated more than 700 works on paper to the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp, making them very rare on the market. In 1987 his work entered the permanent collections of the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels and Antwerp

 

31 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1923, graphit and watercolour on paper
CRP133

 

32 El Lissitzky (Russian, 1890-1941)
Proun, c. 1920, mixed media on paper
CRP126

He was born in Pochinok, near Smolensk, into a Jewish family. In 1903 he began to study with Pen, who was also Chagall’s teacher. In 1909 he went to Germany to study architecture; he travelled to Paris and Italy and in 1915 he settled in Moscow. In 1917 he exhibited with the Mir Iskusstva group (World of Art); after the Revolution he devoted himself to various Jewish cultural activities: he was a publisher and illustrator of books, founder of the Society for the Promotion of Jewish Art and organiser of the Painting and Sculpture of Jewish Artists Exhibition. In 1919 he was invited by Chagall to teach architecture and graphic arts at the Vitebsk School; influenced by Malevich, who arrived in 1919, he adopted Suprematism and developed the concept of PROUN as an intermediary between architecture and painting. In 1920 he joined the Moscow INKhUK (Institute of Artistic Culture) and in 1921 he became a professor at the VKhUTEMAs. In 1922, together with poet Ehrenburg, he founded the magazine Object; together, they defended a compromise between the traditional concept of art and the constructivist of production art. In the 20s he frequently travelled to the West and acted as a link between Russian and Western avant-garde artists: with the Dadaists, Bauhaus in Germany and De Stijl in Holland; he took part in exhibitions and collaborated in avant-garde magazines. He spent almost all 1925 living in Russia; he designed interiors and furniture at the VKhUTEMAs bjecasObjec. In 1925 he completed his utopian Wolkerkratz skyscraper project. In 1929 he made a model for a theatrical production. Then he worked mainly on designing exhibitions in Germany and Russia. In the 30s he also devoted himself to photography and photomontage. In 1928 he joined the October group and in 1930 published his report on Soviet architecture. His last works are antifascist posters, which he created up until his death. His work can be found in the museums of Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, the Guggenheim in New York, Metropolitan, MoMA, Ludwig (Cologne), Thyssen (Madrid); national galleries in Scotland and Canada; Tate, Basel, Norton Simon and Peggy Guggenheim collections (Venice).

 

33 Jos Léonard (Belgian, 1892-1987)
Untitled, c. 1924, Indian ink on paper
CRP125

 

34 Eileen Gray (Irish, 1878-1976)
Untitled, c. 1930, gouache on paper
CRP187

Born in Wexford County, Ireland, into an aristocratic family. She studied at the Slade School of Fine Arts in London from 1898 to 1902. Gray was originally a painter, but when she settled in Paris in 1907 she became interested in furniture lacquering, which she learned from the Japanese master Seizo Sougarawa. In 1913 she exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Décorateurs and attracted the attention of the collector Jacques Doucet, for whom she created the famous Lotus table and the four-panel screen Le Destin. In 1922 she opened her own shop, the Galerie Jean Désert. Her designs transcend the merely decorative, and are characterised by abstraction, simplicity and functionality. A quintessential representative of Art Deco, her chromed tubular steel and glass furniture is much sought after. Her personal life was dramatic: she drove ambulances during World War I in Paris; she was part of the lesbian circles of her time, together with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller and Natalie Barney; and she had an intimate relationship with the Romanian architect Jean Badovici, who encouraged her to experiment directly with architecture. In 1926 she designed the famous E.1027 house (France), which sparked Le Corbusier’s admiration and would eventually become a source of conflict between the two. In 1972, the Royal Society of Arts recognised her career as a designer, architect and artist, granting her the distinction of Royal Designer for Industry. Her work can be found in the Metropolitan and the Victoria & Albert.

 

35 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour, gouache and graphite on paper
CRP130

 

36 Franz Wilhelm Seiwert (German, 1894-1933)
Untitled, 1922, pastel on paper
CRP140

Born in Cologne (Germany). At the age of seven, during an experimental radiological treatment, he suffered severe burns that deeply scarred him. In 1910 he began to study at the School of Arts and Crafts in Cologne. In 1919 he met Max Ernst and collaborated with him in various activities of the Dadaist movement, from which he distanced himself when, together with Heinrich Hoerle and Anton Räderscheidt, he created the group Stupid, in the line of Constructivism, which he would follow as a painter and sculptor. His communist ideas lead him to collaborate in the magazine Die Aktion. In 1923 he celebrated his first great solo exhibition at the Kunstverein in Cologne, while he was already one of the leaders of the Group of Progressive Artists, created after World War I, very active politically and identified with communism and anarcho-syndicalism. In 1929 he founded the magazine Az to spread figurative constructivism, of which he was one of the main theoreticians. When Hitler came to power in 1933, Seiwert fled to Siebengebirge; his friends convinced him to return due to his fragile health, but he died the same year. His work can be seen at the MoMA, the Centre Pompidou (Paris), the National Gallery of Art (London), the Harvard Museum of Art, the Akron Art Museum (Ohio), and the Los Angeles County Art Museum.

 

37 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Untitled, c. 1920, charcoal on paper
CRP041

A painter, graphic artist and designer born in Antwerp. With Donas, Eemans, Flouquet, Léonard, Maes, Servranckx and Vantongerloo he forms the group of the first abstract artists of Belgium. In 1913 he entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, although he was most interested in personal experimentation. In 1914 he painted “Luminist” landscapes and portraits. In 1915-1917, inspired by Theosophy, he moved towards Symbolism. In 1918 he met Marinetti and joined the Futurist movement. With Van Dooren and Cockx he founded the Modern Art group in Antwerp, which established international contacts, for example with the Der Sturm gallery, Berlin’s avant-garde centre, and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He showed his first abstract painting in 1920. He took part in international exhibitions such as those in Geneva in 1921 and Budapest in 1924. He collaborated with avant-garde magazines such as Het Overzicht, which he co-founded in 1921, as well as De Driehoekin 1925, which supported constructivism. His work is in the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Ghent and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His work has been exhibited in museums around the world, such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

38 Reimond Kimpe (Belgian, 1885-1970)
Untitled, 1934, charcoal on silver foil
CRP193

Born in Ghent (Belgium). He graduated as a civil engineer from the University of Ghent. A writer for prestigious magazines and a novelist, he was a self-taught painter. His active participation in the Council of Flanders, created in 1917 by supporters of Flemish independence and supported by Germany, resulted in a death sentence; he fled to the Netherlands at the end of the war and settled in Middelburg, where he worked on construction projects. In 1923, an illness forced him to abandon engineering and he decided to focus on creation. In 1924 he exhibited work in the Middelburg Kunstmuseum, in an Expressionist style and with deep symbolism, in the line of Flemish painters such as Permeke and Gustaaf de Smet. He was inspired by Walcheren’s landscapes, boats and harbours, men and women; he also created work of a more abstract nature. After 1929 he spent long periods in Paris, where he exhibited his work and met Picasso and Chagall. In 1940 his studio and much of his work was destroyed in the Middelburg fire. In 1942 he exhibited at the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, in 1952 at the Het Prinsenhof Museum (Delft) and in 1962 at the CAW aan de Meir in Antwerp. He also exhibited at the Amsterdam Stedelijk Museum and the Amsterdam Rijksmuseum. In 1997, a retrospective was held at the Singer Museum in Laren, which then moved to the Zeeuws Museum in Middelburg. His work can be found at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Bojmans, the Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp, the Zeeuws in Middelburg and in the Contemporary Art Museum of Caracas.

 

39 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Lyrical Fantasy, 1919, watercolour and ink on paper
CRP040

 

40 Léon Kelly (American, 1901-1982)
Untitled, c. 1920, graphite on paper
CRP122

Born in Philadelphia. A painter, draftsman and sculptor, he worked in the milieu of American Surrealism, but also experimented with Cubism, Social Realism and Abstraction. In 1925 he went to Paris, on his first trip to Europe. In 1946, influenced by Peruvian textiles, he created a new style. Giant insects, such as mosquitoes, were a characteristic element of his paintings. His works can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, MoMA and the Philadelphia Museum, among others.

Signed in pencil bottom left: Léon Kelly, and in pen on the back, centre: Léon Kelly. Provenance: Michael and Marilyn Gould. Among his masters, Jean Auguste Adolphe, Alexandre Portinoff, Arthur Carles and Earl Horter, this one latter was interested in Cubism, which, no doubt together with his collection of paintings, influenced on Kelly’s abstract works in his early period, between 1919 and 1925.

 

41 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Asta Nielsen, 1916, graphite on paper
CRP047

A visual artist and writer, he was born in Antwerp and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts. He created the first Dada collages and objects in 1916, three years before Kurt Schwitters, who is often regarded as the pioneer, and the first architectons around seven years before Malevich. His assemblages in boxes, made of found materials, combine the formal austerity of Constructivism with the fantasy of Surrealism; he also produced vigorous post-Cubist and Futurist paintings. His first solo exhibitions were held in 1917 at the Centre Artistique in Antwerp and at the legendary Georges Giroux gallery in Brussels. As an Anarchist, along with Belgian Dadaists Paul Neuhuys and Willy Koninck, he criticised the established order. He co-founded De bond zonder gezegeld papier together with Floris and Oscar Jespers and his friend Paul van Ostaijen, the great avant-garde poet. He also collaborated with Léonard in the magazines Sélection, Ça ira and Het Overzicht. From 1927 and during the 1930s, he moved away from the avant-garde and became a hermit. A strict Catholic, at this time he created his “Gothic” style, inspired by the Flemish Primitives: paintings impregnated with religious mysticism and pubescent eroticism. In 1935 he created a magnificent series of photomontages. Before World War II his painting featured hallucinatory and fantastic subjects. From 1946 until his death, feminine figures dominated his work, from the Virgin Mary to prostitutes from the working-class districts of Antwerp. His work can be found in museums such as the Belgian Fine Arts Museum in Antwerp and Brussels and the Ghent Museum; it has been exhibited at the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden and the Tate Modern in London. His last retrospective was presented in 2014 at the Mu.Zee in Ostend. The Pompidou Centre devoted an important chapter to Joostens in the catalogue for its exhibition Dada.

It is an assemblage of 13 elements. It bears the hallmark of the studio (monogram) twice on the lower part and one on the back. It is the the artist’s oldest dada object we know. It has been exhibited at many shows, among them Paul Joostens 1889-1960, International Cultureel Centrum, Antwerp, 1976; Paul Joostens 1889-1960, Belgisches Haus, Cologne, 1976; Surrealism in Visual Arts and Film, Retretti Art Centre, Punkaharju, Finland, 1987; Paul Joostens, Provinciaal Museum voor Moderne Kunst, Ostende, 1989; L’Avant-Garde en Belgique 1917-1929, Musée d’Art Moderne, Brussels, 1992; Dada l’arte della negazione, Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome; Dada, Centre Pompidou, Paris, and The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 2005; Van Doesberg & the International Avant-Garde: Constructing a New World, Tate Modern, London, and Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhal, Leiden, 2010; Joostens 1889-1960, MuZee, Ostende, 2014; Modernisme, L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe, Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Ghent, 2013. It has been reproduced in the catalogues of most of them.

 

42 Paul Joostens (/Belgian, 1889-1960)
The Spirit of the Village, 1919, graphite and India ink on paper
CRP051

Upper centre, in pencil, the title in Dutch, de geestelijke op het dorp, the date, 1919, and the signature, P. Joostens. Provenance: Paul van Ostaijen (Antwerp); it passed to Roberto Polo (Brussels).

 

43 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Untitled, 1915, watercolour on paper
CRP039

 

44 Georges Vantongerloo (Belgian,1886-1965)
Fonction et variante, 1939, amalgam of pigment and gum Arabic on paper
CRP060

Inscribed on the back by the artist: Fonction et variante/Paris 1939/G. Vantongerloo. Autography and date by the collector Emiel Bergen also in the back: E. Bergen 2002. Provenance: Max Bill (Zurich), who gave it to the art critic Emiel Bergen (Brussels) in 1981. Bergen’s widow sold it to René Van Blerck in 1990. It has been exhibited in several shows, among them Georges Vantongerloo, Musée Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, 1981; Kunstaspekten rond de jaren 1920-1930, Modern Art c.v., Antwerp, 1990; Georges Vantongerloo 1886-1965, Galerie Ronny van de Velde, Antwerp, 1996; Georges Vantongerloo 1886-1965. Un pioneer de la sculpture modern, Musée Départemental Matisse du Cateau-Cambrésis, France, 2007; Georges Vantongerloo. A Longing for Infinity, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2009. The composer Frank Agsteribbe copied it in 2013 with musical directions.

 

45 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1920, wood assemblage
CRP053

 

46 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1925, mixed media assemblage
CRP054

 

47 Adolf Seehaus (German, 1891-1919)
Untitled, 1915, India ink on paper
CRP045 

Expressionist painter born in Bonn. He was discovered by August Macke and trained as an artist while working with him; some of his works were included in the exhibition of Rhineland Expressionists organised by Macke in 1913. He also exhibited in Der Sturm and other galleries. His production–scare due to him having died so young–with references to Fauvism, Cubism and Futurism, was inspired by his home in Rhineland and his trip to England and Ireland. His way of decomposing objects into intricate, isolated shapes and areas of colour matches that of Robert Delaunay.

 

48 Franz Marc (German, 1880-1916)
Two Horses in an Abstract Landscape, c. 1913, India ink and graphite on paper
CRP038

Born in Munich. A painter and engraver famous for the mysticism of nature in his animal paintings, he studied philosophy and theology, as well as art at the Munich Academy. In 1903 his academic naturalism was lightened by contact with French Impressionism; later, the curves of Munich’s Jugendstil and Van Gogh’s turbulent art revealed to him the emotional potential of line and colour. In 1909 he joined the New Association of Artists, where he met Macke. In 1910 he met Kandinsky, with whom he edited Die Blaue Reiter, the magazine that gave its name to a new group, headed by Kandinsky. In 1912, his admiration for Robert Delaunay and the Italian futurists made his art increasingly dynamic. The tendency towards a purely abstract Expressionism culminated in his last great works. He died in Verdun, during World War I. His work can be found at the Franz Marc Museum (Kochen am See, Germany), the Guggenheim (New York), MoMA, the Metropolitan, the Städel (Frankfurt), Stuttgart, Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, the Thyssen (Madrid), the National Gallery of Washington and the Norton Simon Collection.

 

49 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Untitled, c. 1936, oil on canvas mounted on panel
CR50 P056

 

50 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1918, mixed media assemblage
CRP050

Bequeathed by the artist; from Maurice Verbaet and his wife (Antwerp), it passed to Roberto Polo (Brussels). It was exhibited at the shows Paul Joostens 1889-1960, Internationaal Cultureel Centrum, Antwerp, 1976; Belgische Kunst Een moderne eeuw I Collectie Caroline en Maurice Verbaet, Museum van Elsene, Elsene (Brussels), 2012; and Joostens 1889-1960, MuZee, Ostende, 2014.

 

51 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1927, mixed media assemblage
CRP055

Bequeathed by Paul Joostens; it passed to Wide White Space Gallery, Antwerp; later, to Isi Fiszman (Brussels), to Ronny van de Velde (Antwerp) and to Brussels private collection. It has been exhibited at: Paul Joostens, Wide White Space Gallery, Antwerp, 1970; Paul Joostens 1889-1960, International Cultureel Centrum, Antwerp, 1976; Ad Absurdum, Marta Herford, Herford, Germany, 2008. It has been reproduced in the catalogues of the last two.

 

52 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Gilles de Binche (Dada object), 1920, mixed media assemblage
CRP052

ROOM 6

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 6, with works by Rottluf, Vantongerloo, Maes and others.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Untitled.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marthe Donas, Le livre d’images.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Wassily Kandinsky, A Street in Murnau.

Georges Vantongerloo, Construction.

Georges Vantongerloo, Construction.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Eugène Delacroix, Femme de pêcheur à la plage.

ROOM 6 (1 - 26)

ROOM 6

 

1 Joszef Rippl-Ronai (Hungarian, 1861-1927)
Les Jardins du Luxembourg, c. 1898, wool embroidery shaded in oil paint on canvas
CRP016

Born in Kaposvár (Hungary). In 1884 he went to Munich, like many artists from his country, did before gravitating towards Paris to study painting, and in 1886 to the French capital, where he was a disciple of Munkácsy, the most outstanding Hungarian Realist. In 1888 he was influenced by Les Nabis. He returned to Hungary, where an important exhibition of his output from 1890-1900 was held. He exhibited in Germany and Austria with great success. He also designed interiors, furniture and stained-glass windows. His paintings are held at the National Gallery of Hungary (Budapest), the National Gallery of Washington, the Musée d’Orsay, the MoMA and the museums of Cleveland and Chicago.

Monogram R bottom right.

Rippl-Ronai was a close friend of Aristide Maillol, who made some embroideries before becoming a sculptor. Maillol gave up embroidery because it left him blind several months. Inspired by Maillol’s embroideries, Rippl-Ronai used to draw in ink on the back of the canvas, subsequently embroidered by his wife. Maillol’s influence is obvious in the use of point lancé by Rippl-Ronai; however, Rippl-Ronai’s points lancés, often highlighted with oil painting, are made in wool and not in silk, tighter and flatter than Maillol’s. This emphasizes the decorative and artisanal character of his embroidered pictures. Maillol and Rippl-Ronai visited the Cluny museum in Paris together so as to admire the Spanish Renaissance tapestries, made in point lancé. Unlike to Maillol’s delicate colours and subtil contrasts, Rippl-Ronai’s colours are brilliant and his contrasts marked, which adds to his decorative and artisanal appearance even more.

Just like his paintings from around 1910, the style of Rippl-Ronai’s embroidered pictures is characterized by their green, yellow, red and mauve tones, separated by black or brown; he used colours markedly contrasted that he didn’t dare use in his paintings of the time -the bright reds of his embroidered pictures contrast strongly with his yellows, greens and blacks- even if he will use them a decade later in paintings like Je peins Lazarine et Anelle au jardin, Hepi et les autres ont chaud and Ambiance d’été au jardin de la villa Roma, of around 1910. The colours composition of his embroidered pictures is the following: green is the dominant colour, yellow the secondary one, red the tertiary one and mauve the analogous. The background of these works is always green (trees) and yellow (the light that filters among them).

 

2 Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798-1863)
La femme du pêcheur à la plage, c. 1843-45, /oil on canvas
CRP002

The greatest of the French Romantic painters, his use of colour influenced the development of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Born in Charenton-Saint-Maurice, near Paris, he studied under the famous academic painter Guérin and admired Rubens, Raphael, the Venetians and his English contemporaries. Inspired by historical and contemporary events, as well as literature, he was a great reader and friend of famous writers. In 1825 he went to London and established a relationship with English painters; English literature also provided him with subjects. In 1831 he received the Legion of Honour; his most famous painting, Liberty Leading the People, was acquired by the State and exhibited in the Salon with great success. In 1832 he travelled to Morocco accompanying the French ambassador; he discovered the Orient with its light and colours and the experience inspired exotic scenes for the rest of his life. In 1839 he travelled to the Netherlands and studied Rubens in depth. For three decades he executed numerous decorative cycles in official buildings and churches, while continuing to send works to the Salon.

The signature “E.D.” is used on occasion by the artist those years, his fame being perfectly consolidated; previously he preferred a most complete form. The title reproduces that of a work at the Mesdag Museum (The Hague) attributed to Jean-François Millet, probably after as subject by Delacroix; it was bought from an art dealer prior to1886 and has been assigned various dates between 1848 and 1855-60. The connection with Millet comes from a loan of the work by the Mesdag Museum in 1887; it is described as “an old woman sitting on a rock beholding the sea terrified”. It could be a preparatory sketch for a bigger picture; the small size and the sketch-like and expressionist making fit in with the numerous works of the kind he made all his life. Claude Monet refers to this modality in a letter written in 1859: “They are only hints, sketches, but they, as always, have fire and movement”. The laboratory analysis confirmed a date after 1850 and that the colours match up with with those used by Delacroix.

A certain similarity with Michelangelo’s Sybils in the Sixtine Chapel has attracted the attention; indeed, her pose and proportions make her similar above all to the Persic one; with all of them she shares the mannerist canon with a elongated and powerful body a a small head. It is one more demostration of his permanent classical vocation and his admiration for the old masters.

 

3 Dante Gabriel Rossetti (English,1828-1882) & William Morris (English,1834-1896)
The Owl Chair, 1856, natural and painted kapur
CRP004

Rossetti, born in London, was a member of an Anglo-Italian family of writers; he himself was a painter and poet and in 1848 founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, an artistic movement that idealised the Middle Ages. In his youth he was an informal disciple of Ford Madox Brown, who transmitted to him his admiration for the Nazarenes, the German Pre-Raphaelites, and aimed to recover the purity of pre-Renaissance art along with William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and others; he combined painting, poetry and social idealism. The ritual and ornamentation of the Gothic period had a profound influence on him. In 1854 he achieved a powerful patron, art critic John Ruskin, but by then the group had broken apart. Later, with Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris, he began a second phase of the movement, marked by enthusiasm for a legendary past and the ambition to reform applied arts, advocating for the arts to include crafts. With Morris as their driving spirit, they designed stained-glass windows, bookbindings, wallpapers, embroidery and furniture.

Morris was born in Walthamstow, near London; a designer, craftsman, poet and Socialist pioneer, his designs of decorative arts pieces revolutionised Victorian taste. In his youth he worked with G. E. Street, one of the architects of the Gothic Revival movement; under the influence of Dante Gabriel Rossetti he abandoned architecture for painting. In 1861, with Ford Madox Brown, Rossetti, Burne-Jones and others, he founded Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company, an association of “fine art workers”, to make furniture, fabrics, stained glass windows, wallpaper, etc.; in 1874, the company was restructured as Morris & Company. In 1883 he began to travel through industrial areas to spread Socialism; he founded the Socialist League and later the Socialist Society of Hammersmith. In 1891 the Kelmscott Press began to operate; it printed magnificent books with typography designed by Morris and inspired by medieval sources.

It was in the appartament Morris shared with Burne-Jones on 17 Lion Square, Bloomsbury (London). At the Victoria & Albert Museum in London there are two chairs very similar to this one, dated in 1856, the year Rossetti’s frienship with Morris and Burne-Jones, then students in Oxford, began, and the start of the second stage of the Pre-Rafaelite Brotherhood. Morris made pieces of furniture on designs by Rossetti and by Burne-Jones; these chairs match a kind of solid and rural-like, reminiscent of the Middle Ages. They wanted to market them at low prices so as everybody would have access to them. With Rossetti he also created a fine armchair with reed seat.

 

4 Georges Lacombe (French, 1868-1916)
Portrait de Marie Lacombe et de ses filles, 1907-08, wood
CRP031

Born in Versailles into a wealthy family, he didn’t need to live off art and didn’t sell his paintings. He was a painter and sculptor; he studied with Henri Gervex and Alfred Philippe Roll at the Académie Julian. Above all, he admired Gauguin; his work was symbolic and reminiscent of Japanese prints. He spent summers on the coast of Brittany; he established a relationship with Les Nabis, who were very interested in Gauguin and in the search for a pictorial language that was more expressive in form and colour. He painted scenes of Brittany and the sea. Around 1893 he met Gauguin and began to carve simple wooden sculptures. His work can be found at the Musée d’Orsay, the National Gallery of Washington, the Cortauld Institute, the Norton Simon collection and the museums of Indianapolis, Quimper and Rennes.

Exhibited in 1908 at the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris.

 

5 Armand Point (French,1860/61-1932)
Armoire, c. 1892, lime with brass mounts
CRP014

Born in Algiers. He was a Symbolist painter, engraver and designer. He first painted Orientalist scenes of Algeria; in 1888 he went to Paris and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts with Auguste Herst and Fernand Cormon. From 1890 onwards he exhibited at the National Society of Fine Arts. He was influenced by Ruskin and the Pre-Raphaelites, and was a member of the first Nabi group. He travelled to Italy and saw Botticelli’s Primavera; Botticelli and Leonardo made a great impression on him and he set out to resurrect the art of the 15th and 16th centuries. Later he became a full-fledged Symbolist; in 1896-1901 he lived in Marlotte and founded the Haute-Claire workshop, not far from the headquarters of the Barbizon school. At the turn of the century he became increasingly interested in the decorative arts and aimed to emulate William Morris.

Carved by sculptor Charles Virion (1865-1946) after a design by Point. It was in the designer’s bedroom. On a leg of the bed that is part of the bedroom furniture the signature “AP” appears, with the letters intertwined. Point designed it, for his personal use, at the Association de la Haute Claire de Marlotte, in the Forest of Fontainebleau. Drawing on William Morris’ Red House, Point founded the Association de la Haute Claire in 1892; it was the first artists colony in continental Europe created for the purpose of producing decorative art works designed by an artist. Point surrounded himself with craftsmen who transcribed his drawings on metal, enamel, wood and other media, often emplying forgotten Italian Renaissance techniques Exhibited in 2006-09 at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs of Paris.

 

6 Eduard Bick (Swiss, 1883-1947)
Stehendes Mädchen, c. 1900, stained ash tree wood
CRP021

Born in Wil (Switzerland), he was a sculptor, draftsman and graphic artist; he worked in Zurich and Sant’Abbondio, where the foundation that bears his name was created upon his death. He was the son of a goldsmith and learned this trade. In 1906 he entered the Kunstakademie in Munich; in 1908 he moved to Rome and began to devote himself to sculpture. Between 1910 and 1914 he lived in Berlin, but spent seasons in Italy. When the war broke out he returned to Wil and then to Berlin; in 1919 he returned definitively to Switzerland; he settled in Zurich, where he died.

Provenance: the estate of Odette Valabregue Wurzburger (French, born in Avignon and dead in Cleveland in 2006), a philantropist and Law teacher, co-founder of the Cleveland International Piano Competition, and a decorated member of the French Resistance. A similar wooden, with the same title and date and 79.5 cm high, was given by baron August Freiherr von der Heydt to the Weimar Fine Arts Museum. The Von der Heydt Museum in Wuppertal keeps one similar sculpture, documented and reproduced in the sculpture catalogo of this museum.

 

7 William Degouve de Nuncques (French, 1857-1935)
Romeo y Julieta, 1899, oil on canvas
CRP020

Born in Monthermé (Ardennes, France); his family settled in Belgium. A self-taught painter, he came into contact with the Belgian Symbolist poets and belonged to the group Les XX. He travelled a great deal and painted views of Italy, Austria and France; his parks at night are very representative of his style, transmitting the atmosphere of magic and mystery of his works; it has been said that he influenced Surrealism, especially in the case of Magritte. From 1900 to 1902 he lived in the Balearic Islands, painting landscapes. His works can be found at the Musée d’Orsay, the Kröller-Müller de Otterlo and the Musée d’Orsay in Brussels.

Also entitled The lovers. The artist is almost unknown in Spain but enjoys celebrity in the sphere of Central European Symbolism. He draw inspiration in French Symbolist poets like Stéphane Mallarmé and Rémy de Gourmont, but above all in Belgian Symbolist poet and novelist Georges Rodenbach. Very representative of his style are his mysterious images of houses and forest views, and mainly his parks by night with streetlamps projecting enigmatic shadows, like The pink house (1892), which convey the atmosphere of magic and mystery of his works; it has been said that he influenced on Surrealism, mainly on Magritte, four decades his junior, with his light effects.

 

8 Henri Edmond Cross (French,1856-1910)
Vue de Gravelines (nord), vu du Grand-Fort-Philippe, c. 1891, oil on canvas
CRP012

Born in Douai (France). The first time he exhibited at the Salon, in 1881, he changed his surname, Delacroix, to the English form Cross so as not to be confused with Eugène Delacroix; at first he used only the name Henri but then he used Henri-Edmond to avoid confusion with the sculptor Henri Cross. He studied in Lille with Alphonse Colas. In 1884 he was one of the founders of the Society of Independent Artists. His influence from Seurat and Signac made him a disciple of Pointillism. He was initially inspired by Manet and the Impressionists, but in 1891 he produced his first Neo-Impressionist work. He settled in the south of France, where he painted harbours and scenes of peasant life from a point of view close to anarchism. In the mid-1890s, he and Signac abandoned coloured dots for a technique resembling mosaic, an important step towards the development of Fauvism. His work can be found at the Hermitage, the Musée d’Orsay, the Metropolitan and the Thyssen in Madrid, and in the museums of Chicago, San Francisco, Cologne, etc.

The approximate date of this painting, 1891, marks the turning point in the artist’s life and style: Seurat dies in March; he had spent his last summer in Gravelines, close to Dunquerque, painting landscapes and planning The circus, his last work. When his Bathers at Asnières were rejected by the jury of the Salon in 1884, Seurat decided to found the Société des Artistes Indépendents with his friends. The following year the divisionism or pointillism is fully formulated and some artists apart from Cross join it: Signac, Dubois-Pillet, Maximilian Luce or Belgian Van Rysselberghe, besides Pissarro, temporally; it attracts Gauguin, Van Gogh and Regoyos’ attention as well.

Also in 1891 he makes his first pointillist work, a portrait of his wife, and for health reasons he settled permanently in the South, firstly in Cabassa and later in Saint-Clair, close to Saint-Tropez, where Signac used to goes. This one, the main representative of the movement after the early passing of ts creator, was a great traveller and painted the French harbours. That of Gravelines, in Cross’ luminous and colorist vision, is a excellent demonstration of how the artist from Douai interpreted such a rigurous style; he, using bigger points and a glowing chromatism, exerced an influence in the beginnings of Fauvism on Matisse, Derain y Braque’s work. If the date assigned to this painting is right, it means that it was ahead of this subsequent development.

 

9 Wassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944)
A Street in Murnau, c. 1908, oil on hardboard
CRP032

Born in Moscow, after learning music and painting, he studied law and economics at Moscow University, where he taught after 1892. He discovered Rembrandt, the Impressionists and Wagner and decided to devote himself to painting. He moved to Munich and studied with the painter Anton Azbe and at the Academy. In 1902 he exhibited for the first time with the Berliner Sezession and in 1904 at the Salon d’Automne in Paris. He was inspired by the music of Arnold Schönberg and the texts of Wilhelm Worringer. Alongside Franz Marc he founded the Expressionist group Der Blaue Reiter; in 1911 they held their first exhibition at the Tannhäuser gallery in Munich. During these years he chose the path of pure abstraction; his theoretical ideas are found in texts such as Concerning the Spiritual in Art and Point and Line To Plane. In 1914 he moved to Switzerland and then to Moscow; in 1917 he became a member of the People’s Commissariat for Education. When Socialist Realism was imposed, he returned to Germany and taught at the Bauhaus, which the Nazis closed in 1933; his art was considered “degenerate” and he fled to Paris; in Neuilly-sur-Seine he reverted to the free abstraction of his early years. His work can be found in major museums such as MoMA and the Guggenheim in New York, the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Nue Pinakothek in Munich, the Ludwig in Cologne, and the Trétiakov Gallery.

In the summer of 1908 Kandinsky and his partner, the painter Gabriele Münter, discover Murnau, not far from Munich; it will be for him an earthly paradise and the place where he will revise his artistic approach, which very soon will lead him to pure abstraction. The following year they buy a house, where they will spend some periods until 1914. In his repeated stays he paints many small oil sketches of Murnau, generally, like here, a broad street in perspective to the background with bright and contrasted colours, or country roads.

 

10 Hermann Max Pechstein (German, 1881-1955)
Portrait of Charlotte Kaprolat, c. 1909, oil on linen
CRP033

A painter and engraver; an outstanding member of the German expressionist group Die Brücke and known above all for his nudes and landscapes. Born in Zwickau (Germany); in 1900 he went to study in Dresden. In 1906 he joined Die Brücke; this and his knowledge of Matisse’s works led him to use discordant, highly emotive colour combinations. In 1910 he became one of the founders of the Berlin Neue Sezession. In 1914 he travelled to the South Pacific, where he painted exotic subjects in a Primitivist style. Back in Germany, he designed stained glass windows and mosaics and held a teaching position in Berlin. He was forced to resign when the Nazis declared his work “decadent”; he would not work again until after the war.

It is a work very representative of the changes art undergoes at the turn of the century and specifically of German expressionism, replacing the objective representation of reality with the artist’s experience, its expression and its effect on the beholder. The year 1909 was key in Pechstein’s evolution with his first trip to Nidden (Baltic): in contact with nature, he creates freely and his style comes to fruition; those years mean the culmination of his art, which melts shape, colour and expression. It is as well a fundamental date because it marks the beginning of the height of Die Brücke, which receives the decisive encouragement of Fauvism.

 

11 Jean-Jacques Gailliard (Belgian, 1890-1976)
Le Paradis cramoisi, 1917, oil on canvas
CRP065

Born in Brussels. He was a painter, draughtsman, engraver, lithographer and sculptor; he was one of the first Belgian abstract artists. In 1912 he was seduced by the mystical theses of Swedish theosophist Swedenborg and converted to the New Jerusalem Church. Since 1923 he took part in the exhibitions of La Lanterne Sourde, 7 Arts and Les Peintres Constructeurs; in 1924 he taught drawing at the Institut des Arts et Métiers in Brussels; in 1925 he founded the group L’Assaut alongside Flouquet and others. In 1971 he was elected member of the Academy of Sciences, Language and Fine Arts of Belgium, Plastic Arts department. He painted urban views, landscapes, seascapes, portraits, nudes and still lifes; his work can be found in museums in Belgium and also in the United States, Israel, France and Ireland.

Provenance: Queen Elisabeth of Belgium; from her it passed to Dr. Kyriakidis, European representative of Greece in Brussels. The back bears the label RE (Queen Elisabeth) and the hand-written inventory number 945.

 

12 Georges Vantongerloo (Belgian,1886-1965)
Box, c. 1916-25, exterior in oil paint on primed cardboard, interior lined with paper
CRP057

Born in Antwerp, he was the most famous Belgian pioneer of abstract painting and sculpture. He studied at the Academies of Fine Arts in Antwerp and Brussels. From 1914 to 1918 he lived in the Netherlands; in 1917 he exhibited at the Cercle Hollando-Belge. He would later create purely geometric abstract works; although his grid-like compositions may appear arbitrary, they are determined by mathematical relationships. He then met the Belgian futurist Schmalzigaug and Mondrian, Van der Leck and Van Doesburg. In 1924 he published his pamphlet L’Art et son avenir. In 1931 he exhibited at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and was elected vice-president of the association of avant-garde artists Abstraction-Création. In 1936 he took part in the exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art at the MoMA. He exhibited with Bill and Antoine Pevsner at the Kunsthaus in Zurich in 1949. He celebrated his 75th birthday with a solo exhibition at the Suzanne Bollag Gallery in Zurich; in 1962 an extensive retrospective was presented at the new Marlborough Gallery in London; since then there have been many others. His work can be seen in countless public collections: the Art Institute of Chicago, the Groeningemuseum in Bruges, Kröller-Müller in Otterlo, the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Berardo Collection in Lisbon, MoMA in New York, the Fine Arts Museum of Ghent, the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels, the Guggenheim in New York and the Tate Modern in London.

Provenance: Louis E. Stern, prestigious American collector and philanthropist, born in Russia. His Louis E. Stern Foundation choose the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1962 to house a part of his collection. Stern was a member of the board of directors of this museum from 1950 until his death.

The box was inherited by Stern’s sister and later by successive members of her family.

 

13 Georges Vantongerloo (Belgian,1886-1965)
Construction, c. 1917, teak
CRP058

 

14 Edmond van Dooren (Belgian, 1896-1965)
Impression de ville, Londres 1919, oil on canvas
CRP062

A painter and graphic designer, born in Antwerp. In 1911 he entered the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, where he surprised with his daring use of colour. His first works, from 1914, are Impressionist landscapes en plein air. But he was more interested in form than content; in the Academy he befriended Jozef Peeters and in 1916-1919 they found a shared passion for depicting futuristic metropolises, in paintings prefiguring the images of the film Metropolis by Fritz Lang (1927). They also developed a kind of Symbolist and Romantic style related to their worship of Wagner’s music. Influenced by Robert Delaunay, Van Dooren’s work became increasingly abstract. In 1918 he founded with Peeters the Modern Art group, with the participation of Cockx, Léonard and Maes; they made contact with Der Sturm and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He used the linocut technique, which favours geometric abstraction. However, his art evolved towards visions of a futuristic utopia, often suggesting a worship of machines. His futuristic imagery prefigured many Spielberg films. He exhibited in Breda and Antwerp (1956 and 1963), and since the 1970s his work has been included in numerous exhibitions on the Belgian avant-garde, including Modernisme. L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe (Ghent Fine Arts Museum, 2013). His works can be seen in this museum and in Antwerp, among others.

 

15 Gustav Wunderwald (German, 1882-1945)
Grunewaldstrasse, Berlin-Westend, 1918, oil on canvas
CRP096

Born in Cologne. He began as an apprentice with Wilhelm Kuhn; in 1899-1900 he worked painting sets for many theatres in Germany and abroad, and for the Berlin Opera. After World War I he settled in Berlin; he painted scenes of life in the neighbourhoods of this city in the New Objectivity style. In 1927 he began to exhibit urban scenes and landscapes, but had to stop with the rise to power of the Nazis; he survived by colouring films. Once the war was over, he did not have the opportunity to return to his profession, as he died from drinking contaminated water in the chaos of 1945 Berlin.

 

16 Karl Schmidt-Rottluff (German, 1884-1976)
Untitled, 1910-11, textile
CRP034

A painter and engraver celebrated for his expressionist landscapes and engravings, he was born in Rottluff (Saxony, Germany) and began studying architecture in Dresden, where he met Kirchner and Heckel. In 1905 both moved to Dresden to study and paint; together they formed the expressionist group Die Brücke and presented their first exhibition in Leipzig. He added ‘Rottluff’ to his name, which was the name of his native town. In works such as Windy Day (1907) the transition from his early style can be seen, to the mature style of his works such as Self Portrait with Monocle (1910), characterised by daring dissonant colours. In 1911 he moved to Berlin; numerous works from this period reveal his new interest in Cubism. When the Nazis came to power he was forbidden from painting and expelled from the Prussian Academy of Arts; in 1937 many of his paintings were removed from museums and some were included in the exhibition Degenerate Art. In 1947 he was hired as a professor at the University of the Arts in Berlin. Germany paid tribute to him with numerous retrospectives and in 1956 he was awarded the Pour le Mérite medal, Prussia’s highest distinction. In 1964 he was the main promoter of the Brücke Museum in Berlin, inaugurated in 1967 with the works donated by him and other members of the group. His works can be seen at the MoMA, Los Angeles County Museum, the Muscarelle Museum of Art (Williamsburg), the Museum am Theaterplatz (Chemnitz), etc.

The work was commissioned to the artist Wilhelm Niemeyer, from Hamburg, whose descendants lent it to the Landesmuseum Schleswig-Holstein until 1999; in 2008 they sold it (Christie’s, London, Old Master, Modern and Contemporary Prints); it was acquired by Ronny van de Velde, from Antwerp, who sold it in 2012 (De Vuyst, Lokeren, May 12, 2012, Oude Meesters, Moderne en Hedendaagse Kunst) to his present owner.

After being labelled as a “degenerate artist” and forbidden from artistic creation, his works were stolen by Nazi civil servants, hidden (many reappeared in the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg,where they stayed), burnt or sold in auction in Switzerland. Art historians agree that he was one of the most important German expressionists. Schmidt-Rottluff did not consider himself to be only a painter, sculptor and engraver; he was also interested in applied arts, perhaps motivated by the concept of Gesamtkunstwerk or total work of art. It was maybe during his stay in Hardanger Fiord, in Norway, in the summer of 1911, and possibly by influence of popular Norwegian art, when he created his first works of this kind; he started to exhibit them that year and the next one at a show in Cologne, one of whose organisers, Wilhelm Niemeyer -a teacher in Hamburg Kunstgewerbeschule and driving force of the modernisation of the German applied arts-, was one of the first collectors who bought works by the artist in this modality, among them this textile. Schmidt-Rottluff’s most important design project was commissioned by Rosa Schapire in 1921 for the interior of his appartement in Osterbekstrasse, Hamburg; the project, which included furniture, carpets and various wooden and metal objects, was partially confiscated and sold as “degenerate art” by the Nazi governement and partially destroyed in the bombings of the II World War.

 

17 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Construction, c. 1925, exotic wood
CRP134

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

On the back, the monogram KM, bottom right, and the wax seal of the last owner’s family upper right. Herman Maes, the artist’s grandson and trustee of his family record, has confirmed the authenticity of the work. From Karel Maes’ estate it passed to Pieter Albertyn, from Antwerp.

 

18 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled c. 1923, oil on wood panel
CRP132

Signed on the back, bottom right: KM. On the verso it bears the inscription in pencil H vd Velde.

The painting is accompanied by an authenticity certificate issued Herman Maes, the artist’s grandson. Provenance: Piet Maes, the artist’s son; inherited by Herman Maes; later, from Walter Daems, St. Truiden (Flanders), Belgium.

 

19 Georg Kolbe (German, 1877-1947)
Henry van de Velde, 1913, bronze
CRP037

Born in Waldheim (Germany), he studied at the School of Applied Arts in Dresden, then at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and spent six months at the Académie Julian in Paris. In 1898 he moved to Rome and became interested in sculpture. At the beginning of the 20th century he dedicated himself above all to the idealised nude, which he moulded and twisted, clearly influenced by Rodin and Maillol. In 1903 he settled in Berlin, becoming a member of the Sezession, and in 1913 he moved to the Freie Sezession. He volunteered for the Army in 1915, where he was commissioned to design war memorials. In 1919 he was elected a member of the Academy of Berlin. His work from the 1930s has a more heroic monumentality that attracted the Nazi elites, and he became part of the structure of the Reich Chamber of Culture.

 

20 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Le Tango, 1920, India ink on paper
CRP071

Born in Antwerp. Following the suggestion of her friend Van Doesburg, to avoid her gender colouring people’s perception of her art, she also signed works as Tour d’Onasky or Tour Donas. According to Katherine Dreier, founder of the legendary Société Anonyme, she was “Belgium’s first abstract painter”. She was educated at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp; in 1916 she studied stained glass making in Ireland. André Lothe’s exhibition in Paris introduced her to Cubism. Her first fully abstract and Post-Cubist works date from 1917. She was also a precursor of Surrealism. In 1918 she joined the famous Section D’Or in Paris, which was inspired by Cubism and Orphism. Donas’ greatest contribution to modern art is to have been the first person to push Cubism into abstraction. In 1919, Van Doesburgh published several articles on her in De Stijl, placing her among the protagonists of modern art. In 1920 she exhibited in Der Sturm, Herwarth Walden’s gallery and Berlin’s avant-garde centre; all her works were bought by Walden and Katherine Dreier, who, advised by Marcel Duchamp, gathered an impressive collection of masterpieces of the international avant-garde, the core of the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven and MoMA New York. She exhibited again at Der Sturm in 1923. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels presented a retrospective of her in 1960. Her productions have been shown at the Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent, the Von der Heydt in Wuppertal, the Belgian Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, and the Tate Modern in London. In cooperation with the Yale University Art Gallery and the Archipenko Foundation of Bearsville (New York), the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts presented a major exhibition of her work in 2016.

The artist felt intrigued by movement and the play with convex and concave shapes, by diagonals and the alternation of angular and rounded elements. All this and her fascination for dance led her in 1917 to work on the subject of tango until the complete stripping and the reduction of figures to pure geometry in 1920.

 

21 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Le Tango, Der Sturm, 1920, magazine front cover titled, signed and dated by the artist
CRP072

 

22 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Nature morte ‘K’, c. 1917-1918, oil on canvas
CRP068

 

23 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Le livre d’images, c. 1918, oil on plaster and cardboard
CRP069

Signed in oil by the artist bottom near right: Tour Donas. On the back, inscription in oil bay the artist N:16/Le livre d’images par/Tour Donas, as well as two rectangular labels in paper.

Marthe Donas met Alexander Archipenko in 1917. The revolutionary shaped paintings by Belgian artist show the influence of the Russian’s sculpture-paintings, probably inspired by Russian icons. Donas describe the technique she used in these paintings, created in his capital years 1917 and 1919, as facture épaisse en relief. However, whereas Archipenko’s sculpture-paintings, the same as the Russian icons, have conventional quadrangular backgrounds, Donas eliminates the background and so creates the first shaped paintings in the history of western art, which anticipate those of American pop art in the 1960s (Jim Dine, James Rosenquist and Tom Wesselmann). Besides, these works have the same irregular shapes of the things represented and so they become objects, object-paintings. Donas composed his painting following the silhouette of an egg, symbol of maternity, its subject.

 

24 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Adam et Eve, 1927, mixed media assemblage
CRP076

Signed an dated on the back, bottom right: Donas 1927. The artist sold it to Maurits Bilcke, famous Belgian art critic, in 1961. The Marthe Donas Foundation confirmed the authenticity and date of the painting, included by the artist in the inventory of her work for the year 1927. Her daughter, Françoise Franke van Meir, confirmed them as well and remembers having seen the work at home when she was a child.

 

25 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Nature morte à la cuillère, 1920, graphite on paper
CRP074

 

26 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Pot de Cinéraires, 1923, mixed media on panel
CRP075

Signed and dated on the back, upper right: Pot de Cinéraires/Donas/Sceaux avril 1923.

 

Edmund-Kesting,-Verschränku

Edmund Kesting, Verschränku.

Eileen Gray, Untitled.

Eileen Gray, Untitled.

El Lissittzky, Proun.

El Lissittzky, Proun.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Paul Joostens, Dada Object.

Franz Marc, Dos caballos en un paisaje.

Franz Marc, Two Horses in an Abstract Landscape.

Kurt Schwitters, Sin título.

Kurt Schwitters, Untitled.

ROOM 6 (27 - 52)

 

27 Kurt Schwitters (German, 1887-1948)
Untitled, 1929, painted wood
CRP184

Born in Hannover (Germany). He studied at the Academies of Dresden and Berlin and in 1918 he exhibited his first works, Cubo-Futurist, in Der Sturm. Attracted by the nascent Dada school and rejected by the Berlin circle, he formed his own variant in Hanover; he began to create compositions with everyday waste objects; his poems were also a mixture of printed materials. He referred to all of his artistic activities–and then also to all of his daily activities and himself–as Merz, a meaningless word derived from Kommerz. In 1922 he was influenced by De Stijl and moved towards Constructivism; in 1927 he founded Die Abstrakten Hannover, together with Friedrich Vordemberge-Gildewart. In 1930 he took part in the activities of the Cercle et Carré group and in 1932 he joined Abstraction-Création. In 1937 he went to Norway; when the Nazis invaded the country he escaped to England. In his later years he combined Merz with a return to figuration. In 1994, the Kurt Schwitters Archive, an international research centre, was established in the Sprengel Museum (Hanover). His work can be found in the most important contemporary art museums in the world, such as the MoMA and the Tate Gallery in London.

 

28 Edmund Kesting (German, 1892-1970)
Verschränkungen, 1920-25, mixed media assemblage
CRP137

Born in Dresden, he was a photographer, painter and art teacher. He studied at the School of Fine Arts in Dresden, then served as a soldier in World War I. Once the war was over, he continued his training with Richard Müller and Otto Gussmann. In 1923 he held his first exhibition of photographs at the historic Der Sturm Gallery. Once established in Berlin, he got to know the avant-garde circles of the capital and tried experimental techniques; the Nazis would later include him in the “degenerate art” category. After World War II, he joined a group of artists that adopted the name “Call to an art in freedom”. He participated in the polemic over Socialist Realism and Formalism in the German Democratic Republic; his work was not exhibited until 1949-1959. In 1967 he became a professor at the Potsdam Film and Television Academy.

Dedicated and given by the artist in 1926 to Nell Rosland Walden (Berlin), a pionieer of abstract painting in Switzerland and the second wife of Herwarth Walden, the creator of the magazine Der Sturm (1910) and the homonimous gallery (1912) in Berlin, both consecrated to the new artistic tendencies.

 

29 Marthe Donas (Belgian, 1885-1967)
Composition d’après deux femmes, 1920, India ink on paper
CRP073

 

30 Jos Léonard (Belgian, 1892-1987)
Untitled, 1923, gouache and collage on paper
CRP124

Born in Antwerp. He was one of the first non-figurative artists in Belgium. His first abstract works, influenced by Art Nouveau, Cubism and Futurism, date from 1912. Later, he was influenced by De Stijl artists. He was one of the main modernists of Antwerp along with the great avant-garde poet Paul Van Ostaijen and artists such as Paul Joostens, Jozef Peeters and others. He collaborated with Joostens in the avant-garde magazines Sélection, Ça ira and Het Overzicht. After 1925 he worked as an innovative designer of books, advertising and interiors; with commissions from important publishers. His work attracted a lot of attention when it was exhibited at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in 1987. Many of his works were inspired by World War I and Arnold Schoenberg’s music; at times they represent abstract human figures with a sensitivity close to that of Archipenko, or a nocturnal and futuristic metropolis close to those of Van Dooren. In 1973 he donated more than 700 works on paper to the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp, making them very rare on the market. In 1987 his work entered the permanent collections of the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels and Antwerp

 

31 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1923, graphit and watercolour on paper
CRP133

 

32 El Lissitzky (Russian, 1890-1941)
Proun, c. 1920, mixed media on paper
CRP126

He was born in Pochinok, near Smolensk, into a Jewish family. In 1903 he began to study with Pen, who was also Chagall’s teacher. In 1909 he went to Germany to study architecture; he travelled to Paris and Italy and in 1915 he settled in Moscow. In 1917 he exhibited with the Mir Iskusstva group (World of Art); after the Revolution he devoted himself to various Jewish cultural activities: he was a publisher and illustrator of books, founder of the Society for the Promotion of Jewish Art and organiser of the Painting and Sculpture of Jewish Artists Exhibition. In 1919 he was invited by Chagall to teach architecture and graphic arts at the Vitebsk School; influenced by Malevich, who arrived in 1919, he adopted Suprematism and developed the concept of PROUN as an intermediary between architecture and painting. In 1920 he joined the Moscow INKhUK (Institute of Artistic Culture) and in 1921 he became a professor at the VKhUTEMAs. In 1922, together with poet Ehrenburg, he founded the magazine Object; together, they defended a compromise between the traditional concept of art and the constructivist of production art. In the 20s he frequently travelled to the West and acted as a link between Russian and Western avant-garde artists: with the Dadaists, Bauhaus in Germany and De Stijl in Holland; he took part in exhibitions and collaborated in avant-garde magazines. He spent almost all 1925 living in Russia; he designed interiors and furniture at the VKhUTEMAs bjecasObjec. In 1925 he completed his utopian Wolkerkratz skyscraper project. In 1929 he made a model for a theatrical production. Then he worked mainly on designing exhibitions in Germany and Russia. In the 30s he also devoted himself to photography and photomontage. In 1928 he joined the October group and in 1930 published his report on Soviet architecture. His last works are antifascist posters, which he created up until his death. His work can be found in the museums of Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, the Guggenheim in New York, Metropolitan, MoMA, Ludwig (Cologne), Thyssen (Madrid); national galleries in Scotland and Canada; Tate, Basel, Norton Simon and Peggy Guggenheim collections (Venice).

 

33 Jos Léonard (Belgian, 1892-1987)
Untitled, c. 1924, Indian ink on paper
CRP125

 

34 Eileen Gray (Irish, 1878-1976)
Untitled, c. 1930, gouache on paper
CRP187

Born in Wexford County, Ireland, into an aristocratic family. She studied at the Slade School of Fine Arts in London from 1898 to 1902. Gray was originally a painter, but when she settled in Paris in 1907 she became interested in furniture lacquering, which she learned from the Japanese master Seizo Sougarawa. In 1913 she exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Décorateurs and attracted the attention of the collector Jacques Doucet, for whom she created the famous Lotus table and the four-panel screen Le Destin. In 1922 she opened her own shop, the Galerie Jean Désert. Her designs transcend the merely decorative, and are characterised by abstraction, simplicity and functionality. A quintessential representative of Art Deco, her chromed tubular steel and glass furniture is much sought after. Her personal life was dramatic: she drove ambulances during World War I in Paris; she was part of the lesbian circles of her time, together with Romaine Brooks, Gabrielle Bloch, Loie Fuller and Natalie Barney; and she had an intimate relationship with the Romanian architect Jean Badovici, who encouraged her to experiment directly with architecture. In 1926 she designed the famous E.1027 house (France), which sparked Le Corbusier’s admiration and would eventually become a source of conflict between the two. In 1972, the Royal Society of Arts recognised her career as a designer, architect and artist, granting her the distinction of Royal Designer for Industry. Her work can be found in the Metropolitan and the Victoria & Albert.

 

35 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour, gouache and graphite on paper
CRP130

 

36 Franz Wilhelm Seiwert (German, 1894-1933)
Untitled, 1922, pastel on paper
CRP140

Born in Cologne (Germany). At the age of seven, during an experimental radiological treatment, he suffered severe burns that deeply scarred him. In 1910 he began to study at the School of Arts and Crafts in Cologne. In 1919 he met Max Ernst and collaborated with him in various activities of the Dadaist movement, from which he distanced himself when, together with Heinrich Hoerle and Anton Räderscheidt, he created the group Stupid, in the line of Constructivism, which he would follow as a painter and sculptor. His communist ideas lead him to collaborate in the magazine Die Aktion. In 1923 he celebrated his first great solo exhibition at the Kunstverein in Cologne, while he was already one of the leaders of the Group of Progressive Artists, created after World War I, very active politically and identified with communism and anarcho-syndicalism. In 1929 he founded the magazine Az to spread figurative constructivism, of which he was one of the main theoreticians. When Hitler came to power in 1933, Seiwert fled to Siebengebirge; his friends convinced him to return due to his fragile health, but he died the same year. His work can be seen at the MoMA, the Centre Pompidou (Paris), the National Gallery of Art (London), the Harvard Museum of Art, the Akron Art Museum (Ohio), and the Los Angeles County Art Museum.

 

37 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Untitled, c. 1920, charcoal on paper
CRP041

A painter, graphic artist and designer born in Antwerp. With Donas, Eemans, Flouquet, Léonard, Maes, Servranckx and Vantongerloo he forms the group of the first abstract artists of Belgium. In 1913 he entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, although he was most interested in personal experimentation. In 1914 he painted “Luminist” landscapes and portraits. In 1915-1917, inspired by Theosophy, he moved towards Symbolism. In 1918 he met Marinetti and joined the Futurist movement. With Van Dooren and Cockx he founded the Modern Art group in Antwerp, which established international contacts, for example with the Der Sturm gallery, Berlin’s avant-garde centre, and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He showed his first abstract painting in 1920. He took part in international exhibitions such as those in Geneva in 1921 and Budapest in 1924. He collaborated with avant-garde magazines such as Het Overzicht, which he co-founded in 1921, as well as De Driehoekin 1925, which supported constructivism. His work is in the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Ghent and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His work has been exhibited in museums around the world, such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

38 Reimond Kimpe (Belgian, 1885-1970)
Untitled, 1934, charcoal on silver foil
CRP193

Born in Ghent (Belgium). He graduated as a civil engineer from the University of Ghent. A writer for prestigious magazines and a novelist, he was a self-taught painter. His active participation in the Council of Flanders, created in 1917 by supporters of Flemish independence and supported by Germany, resulted in a death sentence; he fled to the Netherlands at the end of the war and settled in Middelburg, where he worked on construction projects. In 1923, an illness forced him to abandon engineering and he decided to focus on creation. In 1924 he exhibited work in the Middelburg Kunstmuseum, in an Expressionist style and with deep symbolism, in the line of Flemish painters such as Permeke and Gustaaf de Smet. He was inspired by Walcheren’s landscapes, boats and harbours, men and women; he also created work of a more abstract nature. After 1929 he spent long periods in Paris, where he exhibited his work and met Picasso and Chagall. In 1940 his studio and much of his work was destroyed in the Middelburg fire. In 1942 he exhibited at the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, in 1952 at the Het Prinsenhof Museum (Delft) and in 1962 at the CAW aan de Meir in Antwerp. He also exhibited at the Amsterdam Stedelijk Museum and the Amsterdam Rijksmuseum. In 1997, a retrospective was held at the Singer Museum in Laren, which then moved to the Zeeuws Museum in Middelburg. His work can be found at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Bojmans, the Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp, the Zeeuws in Middelburg and in the Contemporary Art Museum of Caracas.

 

39 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Lyrical Fantasy, 1919, watercolour and ink on paper
CRP040

 

40 Léon Kelly (American, 1901-1982)
Untitled, c. 1920, graphite on paper
CRP122

Born in Philadelphia. A painter, draftsman and sculptor, he worked in the milieu of American Surrealism, but also experimented with Cubism, Social Realism and Abstraction. In 1925 he went to Paris, on his first trip to Europe. In 1946, influenced by Peruvian textiles, he created a new style. Giant insects, such as mosquitoes, were a characteristic element of his paintings. His works can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, MoMA and the Philadelphia Museum, among others.

Signed in pencil bottom left: Léon Kelly, and in pen on the back, centre: Léon Kelly. Provenance: Michael and Marilyn Gould. Among his masters, Jean Auguste Adolphe, Alexandre Portinoff, Arthur Carles and Earl Horter, this one latter was interested in Cubism, which, no doubt together with his collection of paintings, influenced on Kelly’s abstract works in his early period, between 1919 and 1925.

 

41 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Asta Nielsen, 1916, graphite on paper
CRP047

A visual artist and writer, he was born in Antwerp and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts. He created the first Dada collages and objects in 1916, three years before Kurt Schwitters, who is often regarded as the pioneer, and the first architectons around seven years before Malevich. His assemblages in boxes, made of found materials, combine the formal austerity of Constructivism with the fantasy of Surrealism; he also produced vigorous post-Cubist and Futurist paintings. His first solo exhibitions were held in 1917 at the Centre Artistique in Antwerp and at the legendary Georges Giroux gallery in Brussels. As an Anarchist, along with Belgian Dadaists Paul Neuhuys and Willy Koninck, he criticised the established order. He co-founded De bond zonder gezegeld papier together with Floris and Oscar Jespers and his friend Paul van Ostaijen, the great avant-garde poet. He also collaborated with Léonard in the magazines Sélection, Ça ira and Het Overzicht. From 1927 and during the 1930s, he moved away from the avant-garde and became a hermit. A strict Catholic, at this time he created his “Gothic” style, inspired by the Flemish Primitives: paintings impregnated with religious mysticism and pubescent eroticism. In 1935 he created a magnificent series of photomontages. Before World War II his painting featured hallucinatory and fantastic subjects. From 1946 until his death, feminine figures dominated his work, from the Virgin Mary to prostitutes from the working-class districts of Antwerp. His work can be found in museums such as the Belgian Fine Arts Museum in Antwerp and Brussels and the Ghent Museum; it has been exhibited at the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden and the Tate Modern in London. His last retrospective was presented in 2014 at the Mu.Zee in Ostend. The Pompidou Centre devoted an important chapter to Joostens in the catalogue for its exhibition Dada.

It is an assemblage of 13 elements. It bears the hallmark of the studio (monogram) twice on the lower part and one on the back. It is the the artist’s oldest dada object we know. It has been exhibited at many shows, among them Paul Joostens 1889-1960, International Cultureel Centrum, Antwerp, 1976; Paul Joostens 1889-1960, Belgisches Haus, Cologne, 1976; Surrealism in Visual Arts and Film, Retretti Art Centre, Punkaharju, Finland, 1987; Paul Joostens, Provinciaal Museum voor Moderne Kunst, Ostende, 1989; L’Avant-Garde en Belgique 1917-1929, Musée d’Art Moderne, Brussels, 1992; Dada l’arte della negazione, Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome; Dada, Centre Pompidou, Paris, and The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 2005; Van Doesberg & the International Avant-Garde: Constructing a New World, Tate Modern, London, and Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhal, Leiden, 2010; Joostens 1889-1960, MuZee, Ostende, 2014; Modernisme, L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe, Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Ghent, 2013. It has been reproduced in the catalogues of most of them.

 

42 Paul Joostens (/Belgian, 1889-1960)
The Spirit of the Village, 1919, graphite and India ink on paper
CRP051

Upper centre, in pencil, the title in Dutch, de geestelijke op het dorp, the date, 1919, and the signature, P. Joostens. Provenance: Paul van Ostaijen (Antwerp); it passed to Roberto Polo (Brussels).

 

43 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Untitled, 1915, watercolour on paper
CRP039

 

44 Georges Vantongerloo (Belgian,1886-1965)
Fonction et variante, 1939, amalgam of pigment and gum Arabic on paper
CRP060

Inscribed on the back by the artist: Fonction et variante/Paris 1939/G. Vantongerloo. Autography and date by the collector Emiel Bergen also in the back: E. Bergen 2002. Provenance: Max Bill (Zurich), who gave it to the art critic Emiel Bergen (Brussels) in 1981. Bergen’s widow sold it to René Van Blerck in 1990. It has been exhibited in several shows, among them Georges Vantongerloo, Musée Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, 1981; Kunstaspekten rond de jaren 1920-1930, Modern Art c.v., Antwerp, 1990; Georges Vantongerloo 1886-1965, Galerie Ronny van de Velde, Antwerp, 1996; Georges Vantongerloo 1886-1965. Un pioneer de la sculpture modern, Musée Départemental Matisse du Cateau-Cambrésis, France, 2007; Georges Vantongerloo. A Longing for Infinity, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2009. The composer Frank Agsteribbe copied it in 2013 with musical directions.

 

45 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1920, wood assemblage
CRP053

 

46 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1925, mixed media assemblage
CRP054

 

47 Adolf Seehaus (German, 1891-1919)
Untitled, 1915, India ink on paper
CRP045 

Expressionist painter born in Bonn. He was discovered by August Macke and trained as an artist while working with him; some of his works were included in the exhibition of Rhineland Expressionists organised by Macke in 1913. He also exhibited in Der Sturm and other galleries. His production–scare due to him having died so young–with references to Fauvism, Cubism and Futurism, was inspired by his home in Rhineland and his trip to England and Ireland. His way of decomposing objects into intricate, isolated shapes and areas of colour matches that of Robert Delaunay.

 

48 Franz Marc (German, 1880-1916)
Two Horses in an Abstract Landscape, c. 1913, India ink and graphite on paper
CRP038

Born in Munich. A painter and engraver famous for the mysticism of nature in his animal paintings, he studied philosophy and theology, as well as art at the Munich Academy. In 1903 his academic naturalism was lightened by contact with French Impressionism; later, the curves of Munich’s Jugendstil and Van Gogh’s turbulent art revealed to him the emotional potential of line and colour. In 1909 he joined the New Association of Artists, where he met Macke. In 1910 he met Kandinsky, with whom he edited Die Blaue Reiter, the magazine that gave its name to a new group, headed by Kandinsky. In 1912, his admiration for Robert Delaunay and the Italian futurists made his art increasingly dynamic. The tendency towards a purely abstract Expressionism culminated in his last great works. He died in Verdun, during World War I. His work can be found at the Franz Marc Museum (Kochen am See, Germany), the Guggenheim (New York), MoMA, the Metropolitan, the Städel (Frankfurt), Stuttgart, Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, the Thyssen (Madrid), the National Gallery of Washington and the Norton Simon Collection.

 

49 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Untitled, c. 1936, oil on canvas mounted on panel
CR50 P056

 

50 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1918, mixed media assemblage
CRP050

Bequeathed by the artist; from Maurice Verbaet and his wife (Antwerp), it passed to Roberto Polo (Brussels). It was exhibited at the shows Paul Joostens 1889-1960, Internationaal Cultureel Centrum, Antwerp, 1976; Belgische Kunst Een moderne eeuw I Collectie Caroline en Maurice Verbaet, Museum van Elsene, Elsene (Brussels), 2012; and Joostens 1889-1960, MuZee, Ostende, 2014.

 

51 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Dada object, c. 1927, mixed media assemblage
CRP055

Bequeathed by Paul Joostens; it passed to Wide White Space Gallery, Antwerp; later, to Isi Fiszman (Brussels), to Ronny van de Velde (Antwerp) and to Brussels private collection. It has been exhibited at: Paul Joostens, Wide White Space Gallery, Antwerp, 1970; Paul Joostens 1889-1960, International Cultureel Centrum, Antwerp, 1976; Ad Absurdum, Marta Herford, Herford, Germany, 2008. It has been reproduced in the catalogues of the last two.

 

52 Paul Joostens (Belgian, 1889-1960)
Gilles de Binche (Dada object), 1920, mixed media assemblage
CRP052

ROOM 7

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 7 with works by Marc Eemans and a table designed by Servranckx.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Marc Eemans, Kallomorphose V.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Gustáv Miklos, Untitled.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Karel Maes, rug.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Victor Servranckx, table.

ROOM 7

 

1 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose, 1925, painted assemblage on wood
CRP152

Belgian painter, poet and art critic, born in Termonde (Belgium). Studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, he met Victor Servranckx, who taught him the principles of non-figurative art. At the age of 15 he joined the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts. His early revolutionary works include Constructivist assemblages and non-figurative paintings meticulously balanced in solemn and subtle harmonies of colour, prefiguring those of Mark Rothko. In 1925 he began to move away from non-figurative art and became Belgium’s first Surrealist painter, before Magritte. Exhibiting with Salvador Dalí, he also became friends with members of the Societé du Mystère, a Belgian Surrealist group. His paintings from this period are inspired by the spiritual qualities of the Pre-Raphaelites, the German Romantics and the Symbolists. In 1939 he exhibited in the Indépendants at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Since then, his works have been exhibited in many places, including the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. As a poet and writer he collaborated with the Surrealist magazine Distances, which was directed from Paris by Camille Goeman, who was the first to deal with Dalí’s work. Once at the heart of the ideological events of the Surrealist group, he decided to abandon it in order to develop his solo experiences, but remained friends with Goemans, Magritte and Mesens. His work can be found in public collections such as those of the Belgian Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp.

Singed and dated on the back, bottom left: MARC. EEMANS.XXV. Provenance: Carl László collection, Basel; later, Galerie von Bartha in the same city and Bernet collection, Munich.

 

2 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose V, 1924, painted mixed media assemblage
CRP149 

Signed and dated bottom right: MARC EEMANS XXIV. The back bears the label (upper left) of the exhibition The Planar Dimension, celebrated in New York. Provenance: Neyrinck collection (Sint-Martens-Latem); later, Carl László collection and private collection in Munich, from where it passed to Mr and Mrs Polo collection (Brussels). Exhibited at The Planar Dimension, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1979.

In 1924, Eemans began a series of works, both reliefs painted on board and oils on canvas, where we can see the connection with the group 7 Arts with their advocacy of reason in the arts and their conception of painting as something close, if not subordinated, to architecture. In October 1978, Eemans expained the title he gave to all them, “kallomorphose”, in a letter to Margit Rowell, author of the catalogue of the exhibition The Planar Dimension, celebrated the following year at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; he says that the created it by analogy with “metamorphose” and “anamorphose”, and reminds that the Grrek work kalós means “beuty”. 

 

3 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Rug, c. 1925, wool
CRP135

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

 

4 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Table, 1925, chromed steel with top in precious wood inlay and chromed steel
CRP087

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

5 Gustáv Miklos (Hungarian, 1888-1967)
Untitled, c. 1924, lacquered ebony
CRP167

Born in Budapest (Hungary). From 1904 to 1906 he studied at the Royal National School of Arts and Crafts of Hungary with Kimnach Laszlo; he met the sculptor Joseph Csaky. In Paris he studied at the Académie de La Palette with Henri Le Fauconnier and moved towards Cubism. He entered Jean Metzinger’s studio and exhibited at the Autumn Salon and at the Société des Artistes Indépendants, where he met Archipenko and Léger. He also produced illustration, posters and furniture design. In World War I he served in Bizerta, Tunis and Thessaloniki; he continued to draw and paint watercolours in vivid colours, inspired by the new landscapes. In 1919 he exhibited at the Exposition des artistes d’Orient in Athens. In 1922 he became a French citizen. Jacques Doucet, a collector and designer of jewellery, asked him to participate in the decoration of his villa in Neuilly. In 1923, he exhibited in a group exhibition at Léonce Rosenberg’s Galerie de L’Effort Moderne; in 1925, at the International Exhibition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts, already in the ranks of Art Deco, and in 1928 at the Galerie de la Renaissance. In 1930 he joined the French Union of Modern Artists. In 1939 he moved to Oyonnax (France), where he taught art and eventually died in obscurity. He was rediscovered in several exhibitions on Art Deco; his work can be found in many public and private collections.

 

6 Vasily Dmitriewitsch Ermilov (Ukrainian, 1894-1968)
Suprematist Relief M, 1924, mixed media assemblage
CRP166 

Born in Jarvik (Ukraine). He was a Cubist, Constructivist and Neo-Primitivist painter and designer. He studied at the School of Applied Arts in his city and in 1912 went to the School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture in Moscow. In 1913 he joined the Budiak group and in 1914 returned to the Jarvik School. In 1918 he founded the League of Seven, which organised an exhibition. In 1920 he directed the art section of the Ukrainian office of the Russian Agency and was a decorator for the Red Ukraine agitprop movement. In 1925 he became a member of the Ukrainian Revolutionary Art Association. In 1928 he designed the magazine Avantgarde, as well as covers for books and magazines, and interiors. In the 1940s he was a professor at the National Institute of Art in Kharkov. He took part in many international exhibitions: Leipzig 1922 (gold medal), Paris 1925, Cologne 1928; in Kharkov, a solo exhibition in 1962 and retrospectives in 1969 and 1994. He was one of the most important constructivists in Ukraine and one of the best designers of his generation; his work in the form of posters, political propaganda and advertising is particularly of note. His works are in museums and collections in Russia, Ukraine, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and France.

 

7 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose X, 1925, oil on canvas
CRP151

Signed and dated, plus title, on the back, which also bears the label of the exhibition Vers une plastique pure, Les premiers abstraits belges / 1918-1930, in Brussels. Provenance: private collection in Bruselas and private collection in Berlin. Exhibited at Vers une plastique pure, Les premiers abstraits belges / 1918-1930, Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, 1972.

 

8 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Untitled, 1926, oil on hardboard
CRP153

 

9 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose VI, 1925, oil on canvas
CRP150

Signed and dated upper left; the same plus title on the back. Provenance: private collection in Brussels and private collection in Berlin.

 

10 Georges Tesson (French)
Untitled, c. 1925, oil on masonite
CRP105

French painter and sculptor with a post-cubist, abstract style. His main inspiration came from the Paris School and Cubism. Paintings signed by G. Tesson or with the monogram G.T. have appeared on the market, especially in Holland, with a rigorous and professional design and geometric style. Some of the colourful ones show a post-cubist spirit and recall Léger, Metzinger or Hayden; others, abstract and very constructed, in shades of grey, ochre and brown, recall the austere order of Ben Nicholson.

ROOM 7

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 7 with works by Marc Eemans and a table designed by Servranckx.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Marc Eemans, Kallomorphose V.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Gustáv Miklos, Untitled.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Karel Maes, rug.

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Victor Servranckx, table.

ROOM 7

 

1 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose, 1925, painted assemblage on wood
CRP152

Belgian painter, poet and art critic, born in Termonde (Belgium). Studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, he met Victor Servranckx, who taught him the principles of non-figurative art. At the age of 15 he joined the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts. His early revolutionary works include Constructivist assemblages and non-figurative paintings meticulously balanced in solemn and subtle harmonies of colour, prefiguring those of Mark Rothko. In 1925 he began to move away from non-figurative art and became Belgium’s first Surrealist painter, before Magritte. Exhibiting with Salvador Dalí, he also became friends with members of the Societé du Mystère, a Belgian Surrealist group. His paintings from this period are inspired by the spiritual qualities of the Pre-Raphaelites, the German Romantics and the Symbolists. In 1939 he exhibited in the Indépendants at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Since then, his works have been exhibited in many places, including the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. As a poet and writer he collaborated with the Surrealist magazine Distances, which was directed from Paris by Camille Goeman, who was the first to deal with Dalí’s work. Once at the heart of the ideological events of the Surrealist group, he decided to abandon it in order to develop his solo experiences, but remained friends with Goemans, Magritte and Mesens. His work can be found in public collections such as those of the Belgian Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp.

Singed and dated on the back, bottom left: MARC. EEMANS.XXV. Provenance: Carl László collection, Basel; later, Galerie von Bartha in the same city and Bernet collection, Munich.

 

2 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose V, 1924, painted mixed media assemblage
CRP149 

Signed and dated bottom right: MARC EEMANS XXIV. The back bears the label (upper left) of the exhibition The Planar Dimension, celebrated in New York. Provenance: Neyrinck collection (Sint-Martens-Latem); later, Carl László collection and private collection in Munich, from where it passed to Mr and Mrs Polo collection (Brussels). Exhibited at The Planar Dimension, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1979.

In 1924, Eemans began a series of works, both reliefs painted on board and oils on canvas, where we can see the connection with the group 7 Arts with their advocacy of reason in the arts and their conception of painting as something close, if not subordinated, to architecture. In October 1978, Eemans expained the title he gave to all them, “kallomorphose”, in a letter to Margit Rowell, author of the catalogue of the exhibition The Planar Dimension, celebrated the following year at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; he says that the created it by analogy with “metamorphose” and “anamorphose”, and reminds that the Grrek work kalós means “beuty”. 

 

3 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Rug, c. 1925, wool
CRP135

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

 

4 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Table, 1925, chromed steel with top in precious wood inlay and chromed steel
CRP087

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

5 Gustáv Miklos (Hungarian, 1888-1967)
Untitled, c. 1924, lacquered ebony
CRP167

Born in Budapest (Hungary). From 1904 to 1906 he studied at the Royal National School of Arts and Crafts of Hungary with Kimnach Laszlo; he met the sculptor Joseph Csaky. In Paris he studied at the Académie de La Palette with Henri Le Fauconnier and moved towards Cubism. He entered Jean Metzinger’s studio and exhibited at the Autumn Salon and at the Société des Artistes Indépendants, where he met Archipenko and Léger. He also produced illustration, posters and furniture design. In World War I he served in Bizerta, Tunis and Thessaloniki; he continued to draw and paint watercolours in vivid colours, inspired by the new landscapes. In 1919 he exhibited at the Exposition des artistes d’Orient in Athens. In 1922 he became a French citizen. Jacques Doucet, a collector and designer of jewellery, asked him to participate in the decoration of his villa in Neuilly. In 1923, he exhibited in a group exhibition at Léonce Rosenberg’s Galerie de L’Effort Moderne; in 1925, at the International Exhibition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts, already in the ranks of Art Deco, and in 1928 at the Galerie de la Renaissance. In 1930 he joined the French Union of Modern Artists. In 1939 he moved to Oyonnax (France), where he taught art and eventually died in obscurity. He was rediscovered in several exhibitions on Art Deco; his work can be found in many public and private collections.

 

6 Vasily Dmitriewitsch Ermilov (Ukrainian, 1894-1968)
Suprematist Relief M, 1924, mixed media assemblage
CRP166 

Born in Jarvik (Ukraine). He was a Cubist, Constructivist and Neo-Primitivist painter and designer. He studied at the School of Applied Arts in his city and in 1912 went to the School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture in Moscow. In 1913 he joined the Budiak group and in 1914 returned to the Jarvik School. In 1918 he founded the League of Seven, which organised an exhibition. In 1920 he directed the art section of the Ukrainian office of the Russian Agency and was a decorator for the Red Ukraine agitprop movement. In 1925 he became a member of the Ukrainian Revolutionary Art Association. In 1928 he designed the magazine Avantgarde, as well as covers for books and magazines, and interiors. In the 1940s he was a professor at the National Institute of Art in Kharkov. He took part in many international exhibitions: Leipzig 1922 (gold medal), Paris 1925, Cologne 1928; in Kharkov, a solo exhibition in 1962 and retrospectives in 1969 and 1994. He was one of the most important constructivists in Ukraine and one of the best designers of his generation; his work in the form of posters, political propaganda and advertising is particularly of note. His works are in museums and collections in Russia, Ukraine, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and France.

 

7 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose X, 1925, oil on canvas
CRP151

Signed and dated, plus title, on the back, which also bears the label of the exhibition Vers une plastique pure, Les premiers abstraits belges / 1918-1930, in Brussels. Provenance: private collection in Bruselas and private collection in Berlin. Exhibited at Vers une plastique pure, Les premiers abstraits belges / 1918-1930, Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, 1972.

 

8 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Untitled, 1926, oil on hardboard
CRP153

 

9 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Kallomorphose VI, 1925, oil on canvas
CRP150

Signed and dated upper left; the same plus title on the back. Provenance: private collection in Brussels and private collection in Berlin.

 

10 Georges Tesson (French)
Untitled, c. 1925, oil on masonite
CRP105

French painter and sculptor with a post-cubist, abstract style. His main inspiration came from the Paris School and Cubism. Paintings signed by G. Tesson or with the monogram G.T. have appeared on the market, especially in Holland, with a rigorous and professional design and geometric style. Some of the colourful ones show a post-cubist spirit and recall Léger, Metzinger or Hayden; others, abstract and very constructed, in shades of grey, ochre and brown, recall the austere order of Ben Nicholson.

ROOM 8

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 8, with the tubular dining-room set by Baugniet.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Jozef Peeters, Untitled.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marcel-Louis Baugniet, Contrepoint bleu.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Victor Servranckx, Opus 4 – 1927 (Cataclysme apprivoisé).

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Pierre-Louis Flouquet, Construction n° 29.

ROOM 8

 

1 Marcel-Louis Baugniet (Belgian, 1896-1995)
Contrepoint bleu, 1925, oil on wood
CRP142

One of the main exponents of abstract art in Belgium. He was born in Liège and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, alongside Delvaux and Magritte. From 1921-1922 he lived in Paris; he discovered Constructivism through artists such as Frantisek Kupka and became a spokesperson for this movement in Belgium. From 1923 he collaborated in the magazine 7 Arts, a bridge between Belgian art and the international avant-garde, gathered around the notion of “pure plastic”. He was also a furniture designer, heavily influenced by the Bauhaus movement. From 1930 to 1972 he had a decoration shop and workshop in Brussels, Baugniet et Cie. He exhibited his furniture at the Monza and Milan triennials (1930-1933-1935) and at the International Exhibitions in Brussels (1935) and Paris (1937). He also created sets, costumes and posters, especially for his wife, dancer Marguerite Acarin (“Akarova”), and was an art critic; all his aesthetic essays were compiled at the end of the 80s in the volume Vers une synthèse esthétique et sociale. He took part in numerous exhibitions and his work was represented in important public and private collections. In 2001, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Liège dedicated a large retrospective to all his creative facets.

Signed and dated bottom right: M – L Baugniet 1925. Id. and title on the back. It featured at the exhibition Les premiers abstraits wallons: Baugniet, Closon, Engel-Pak, Lacasse, Lempereur-Haut, organised by Le centre wallon d’art contemporain de la Communauté française de Belgique, Flemalle (Ramet), 1984-85; reproduced in the catalogue. 

After having discovered the Czech artist Frantisek Kupka, he devotes himself geometric abstraction. In 1923, together with Pierre and Victor Bourgeois, Félix de Boeck, Marc Eemans, Pierre-Louis Flouquet, Karel Maes, René Magritte, Jozef Peeters, Victor Servranckx and others, he becomes an active member of the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts,  around the homonymous magazine, and a prominent representant of the European constructivist movement; together with Oskar Schlemmer, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Fernand Léger and many others he mantains close ties with the baroness Hélène de Mandrot and her Maison des Artistes, at Château de La Sarraz, in the vicinity of Lausanne.  

 

2 Victor Servranckx (/Belgian, 1897-1965)
Untitled, 1921, oil on canvas
CRP082

Signed and dated bottom left: SERVRANCKX 1921.

 

3 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Untitled, 1920, gouache on paper
CRP106

Born in Paris, in 1910 his family moved to Brussels, where he studied with Constant Montald and Gisbert Combaz at the Academy of Fine Arts. He connected with the avant-garde of Antwerp, Berlin, Brussels, Lausanne and Paris; sharing a studio with Magritte in Brussels. In modernist circles he was known for his abstractions and biomorphic and geometric works. In 1921 he took part in the International Exhibition of Modern Art in Geneva and, with Magritte, in the Centre d’Art in Brussels. He was co-founder of the avant-garde group 7 Arts; he was responsible for the painting section of its magazine and its illustrator. Alongside Eisenstein, Ernst, Gropius, Schlemmer, Servranckx and others he was a regular guest at Baroness Hélène de Mandrot’s Maison des Artistes, at her Château de La Sarraz, near Lausanne, where the First International Congress of Modern Architecture, the First Congress of Independent Cinema in 1929 and many other early 20th century revolutionary artistic manifestations were held. Hélène de Mandrot, like Katherine Dreier and Gertrude Stein, is one of the mainstays of modern art. In 1925, Flouquet founded the L’Assaut group with Gailliard and organised exhibitions under his aegis. As a leader of La Plastique Pure, he regularly exhibited abroad: Buenos Aires, Chicago, Leipzig, Madrid, Monza, New York, Paris, Philadelphia and Zurich; alone, in 1925 at the Der Sturm gallery and in 1927 at the Deutsche Werkbund in Stuttgart, founded by Henry van de Velde, who invited him. He designed many covers for the revolutionary art magazine Der Sturm. His work can be found in museums such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, the Museum of Ghent and the avant-garde Museum of Grenoble; it has been exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden, the Museum of Ghent and the Tate Modern in London, among others.

 

4 Bruno Gutensohn (German, 1895-1969)
Regenbogengarten, 1920s, oil on aluminum foil mounted on particle board
CRP185

Gutensohn was born in Munich and studied graphic art from 1913 to 1915 at the Munich Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Arts and Crafts) under Fritz Helmuth Ehmcke. He worked as a designer for various textile companies, such as Wallach, and after 1945 as an illustrator for numerous publishers in Munich. In 1932 he became a member of the Association of Revolutionary Visual Artists of Germany. He was the partner of the Korean writer Mirok Li, who died in 1950. He participated in the Art Institute of Chicago’s Second International Exhibition of Lithography and Wood Engraving (1930-1931). Much of his work was destroyed in the 1944 and 1945 bombing of Munich. The Lebachhaus Museum has 16 woodcuts by Gutensohn, some of them dated 1955, 1958 and 1966.

 

5 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Synthèse,1924, oil on canvas
CRP044

A painter, graphic artist and designer born in Antwerp. With Donas, Eemans, Flouquet, Léonard, Maes, Servranckx and Vantongerloo he forms the group of the first abstract artists of Belgium. In 1913 he entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, although he was most interested in personal experimentation. In 1914 he painted “Luminist” landscapes and portraits. In 1915-1917, inspired by Theosophy, he moved towards Symbolism. In 1918 he met Marinetti and joined the Futurist movement. With Van Dooren and Cockx he founded the Modern Art group in Antwerp, which established international contacts, for example with the Der Sturm gallery, Berlin’s avant-garde centre, and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He showed his first abstract painting in 1920. He took part in international exhibitions such as those in Geneva in 1921 and Budapest in 1924. He collaborated with avant-garde magazines such as Het Overzicht, which he co-founded in 1921, as well as De Driehoekin 1925, which supported constructivism. His work is in the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Ghent and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His work has been exhibited in museums around the world, such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

6 Arno Breker (German, 1900-1991)
Leopold III, king of the Belgians, 1930, plaster
CRP186

Born in Elberfeld (Germany). After studying sculpture and architecture, he began to make abstract sculptures, but soon moved on to classical and post-Cubist sculpture. In 1927 he went to Paris; he got involved with the avant-garde and established a friendship with Maillol. He studied the human body and began his long “classical period”. In 1932 he went to Italy to deepen his knowledge of ancient art; he returned in 1934, when the Nazis were already in power. He was opposed to the policy of “degenerate art” but carried on with his official commissions, which began in 1930. In 1937 he was professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Berlin and between 1938 and 1945 he collaborated with Albert Speer in Hitler’s plans for the new Berlin, with athletic and monumental sculptures for the new buildings. He also collaborated with architect Werner March on the grounds for the Nazi party assemblies in Nuremberg. In 1940, Stalin invited him to work in the USSR. In 1942 he exhibited in occupied Paris; in 1948 he was included in the denazification processes. He would continue to work in different styles until a later age. After his death, the Arno Breker Museum was founded in Nörwenich Castle, near Cologne and Bonn.

 

7 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour, gouache and graphite on paper
CRP130

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

 

8 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960) 
Untitled, c. 1923, painted cement
CRP043

 

9 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour on paper
CRP128

 

10 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour on paper
CRP127

11 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled c. 1920, watercolour on paper
CRP129

12 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Rug, c. 1925, wool
CRP115

13 Marcel-Louis Baugniet (Belgian, 1896-1995)
Dining room set comprising a table and 6 chairs, 1927-28, chairs in chrmed steel with seats upholstered in imitation lamb’s wool, table in chromed steel with a wood and linoleum top 
CRP143 

Designed in 1927 and manufactured by the Les Anciennes Usines Annoye in 1928. In the 20’, the artist began to design furnitures, many of them made with metal tubes and polychrome lacquer with a cellulose basis. He took part in several Salons d’Automne in Paris. In 1930 he opened his design showroom in Brussels, where he attracted important personalities of the European avant-garde such as Kurt Schwitters and Paul Klee. In 1937, inspired by the furniture Silex (1905) by Gustave Serrurier-Bovy, he exhibited his pieces of furniture Standax, which the buyer could assemble and dismantle, at the Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne, in Paris. 

His biographer, Robert Vivier, described the design work by Baugniet as “a balance between aeshteticism and human y content”. As early as 1926, Baugniet, Henry van de Velde and Victor Servranckx published a design furniture project at the avant-garde Polish Blok. The experts agree that the first  tubular nickel-plated chair was designed by Marcel Breuer in 1926; Baugniet designed this tubular chair the following year and had it produced one more year after, and in this way he established himself in the avant-garde of tubular nickel-plated furniture. The same year 1927, Baugniet and his partner Ewaud Van Tonderen founded a company of furniture design in Brussels. Two years before he had created the Union des Artistes Modernes (UAM), the first French movement of Modernist design, which introduced this sort of furniture in France. Even though Baugniet wanted to democratise his designs, his customers were wealthy people; because of that, his tubular nickel-plated pieces of furniture are scarce. The artist designed two models of his chair: this one, less usual, with seats upholstered in imitation lamb’s wool, and the other, without upholstery.

14 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Peinture, 1922, oil on canvas 
CRP108

15 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Construction nº 43 (Peinture murale – B), 1925, oil on canvas 
CRP113

16 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (/French, 1900-1967)
Construction nº 29, 1925, oil on canvas 
CRP112

17 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 4 – 1927 (Cataclysme apprivoisé), oil on plywood
CRP089      

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

Signed and dated bottom right: SERVRANCKX.

In the original frame designed by the artist. Provenance: Victor Servranckx, Elewyt, Belgium; inherited by his son, Paul Servranckx, Brussels. Exhibited in 194, Servranckx, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels; 1950, La peinture belge contemporaine, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon; 1957, Homage à Servranckx à l’occasion de son soixantième anniversaire, Galerie “Les contemporains”, Brussels; 1958, L’Art du XXIe siècle, Palais des Expositions, Charleroi; 1958, Servranckx, pionier van de abstracte kunst, Concertgebouw, Bruges; 1958, Exposition Mobile, Peintures d’avant-garde, Galerie “Les contemporains”, Brussels; 1959, XXXVe Salon du Cercle Royal Artistique et Littéraire de Charleroi, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Charleroi;1959, Hassenhuis, Antwerp ;1960, The Arts of Belgium, Parke-Bernet Galleries ; 1962, XXXIe Biennale; 1963, Profile II – Belgische Kunst Heute, Städtische Kunstgalerie, Bochum;1963, Belgische Künstler von der Jahrhundertwende bis zur Gegenwart, Kunstgebäude am Schlossplatz Stuttgart, Stuttgart; 1965, Servranckx, Musée d’Ixelles, Ixelles;1970, Retrospectieve tentoonstelling Victor Servranckx 1897-1965, Provinciaal Begijnhof, Hasselt; 1989, Victor Servranckx 1897-1965 et l’art abstrait, Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels; 2013, Modernisme, L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe, Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Ghent, 2013.

18 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 14 – 1927, oil on canvas
CRP088

Signed and dated bottom left: SERVRANCKX 1927  

Provenance: Jacqueline Errera, Brussels; private collection (acquired from the prevoious one). Exhibited at the retrospective Servranckx, Musée d’Ixelles, Brussels, 1965, and at id. Victor Servranckx 1897 – 1965, Rubenskasteel, Elewijt, Belgium.

19 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 6 – 1933, Monstre marin féminin, oil on canvas
CRP092

20 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 14 – 1931, Le printemps passe dans le verger, oil on canvas
CRP090

Signed  and dated bottom left: SERVRANCKX 1931. On the stretcher there is a label with the title.

21 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 12 – 1920, oil on canvas
CRP080

22 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)

Opus 4 – 1953, Plastique Pure, later also titled by the artist Ascension vers le space or Sputnik, oil on canvas
CRP095

23 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 58 – 1923, oil on canvas
CRP083 

Signed and dated upper left: SERVRANCKX 1923  Exhibited in 2013 at Modernisme, L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe, Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Ghent, n° 4.88

24 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 4 – 1949, oil on canvas
CRP093

25Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 1 – 1921, patinated plaster
CRP081

ROOM 8

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 8, with the tubular dining-room set by Baugniet.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Jozef Peeters, Untitled.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marcel-Louis Baugniet, Contrepoint bleu.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Victor Servranckx, Opus 4 – 1927 (Cataclysme apprivoisé).

Jan Vanriet, Berlin, The Salute.

Pierre-Louis Flouquet, Construction n° 29.

ROOM 8

 

1 Marcel-Louis Baugniet (Belgian, 1896-1995)
Contrepoint bleu, 1925, oil on wood
CRP142

One of the main exponents of abstract art in Belgium. He was born in Liège and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, alongside Delvaux and Magritte. From 1921-1922 he lived in Paris; he discovered Constructivism through artists such as Frantisek Kupka and became a spokesperson for this movement in Belgium. From 1923 he collaborated in the magazine 7 Arts, a bridge between Belgian art and the international avant-garde, gathered around the notion of “pure plastic”. He was also a furniture designer, heavily influenced by the Bauhaus movement. From 1930 to 1972 he had a decoration shop and workshop in Brussels, Baugniet et Cie. He exhibited his furniture at the Monza and Milan triennials (1930-1933-1935) and at the International Exhibitions in Brussels (1935) and Paris (1937). He also created sets, costumes and posters, especially for his wife, dancer Marguerite Acarin (“Akarova”), and was an art critic; all his aesthetic essays were compiled at the end of the 80s in the volume Vers une synthèse esthétique et sociale. He took part in numerous exhibitions and his work was represented in important public and private collections. In 2001, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art of Liège dedicated a large retrospective to all his creative facets.

Signed and dated bottom right: M – L Baugniet 1925. Id. and title on the back. It featured at the exhibition Les premiers abstraits wallons: Baugniet, Closon, Engel-Pak, Lacasse, Lempereur-Haut, organised by Le centre wallon d’art contemporain de la Communauté française de Belgique, Flemalle (Ramet), 1984-85; reproduced in the catalogue. 

After having discovered the Czech artist Frantisek Kupka, he devotes himself geometric abstraction. In 1923, together with Pierre and Victor Bourgeois, Félix de Boeck, Marc Eemans, Pierre-Louis Flouquet, Karel Maes, René Magritte, Jozef Peeters, Victor Servranckx and others, he becomes an active member of the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts,  around the homonymous magazine, and a prominent representant of the European constructivist movement; together with Oskar Schlemmer, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Fernand Léger and many others he mantains close ties with the baroness Hélène de Mandrot and her Maison des Artistes, at Château de La Sarraz, in the vicinity of Lausanne.  

 

2 Victor Servranckx (/Belgian, 1897-1965)
Untitled, 1921, oil on canvas
CRP082

Signed and dated bottom left: SERVRANCKX 1921.

 

3 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Untitled, 1920, gouache on paper
CRP106

Born in Paris, in 1910 his family moved to Brussels, where he studied with Constant Montald and Gisbert Combaz at the Academy of Fine Arts. He connected with the avant-garde of Antwerp, Berlin, Brussels, Lausanne and Paris; sharing a studio with Magritte in Brussels. In modernist circles he was known for his abstractions and biomorphic and geometric works. In 1921 he took part in the International Exhibition of Modern Art in Geneva and, with Magritte, in the Centre d’Art in Brussels. He was co-founder of the avant-garde group 7 Arts; he was responsible for the painting section of its magazine and its illustrator. Alongside Eisenstein, Ernst, Gropius, Schlemmer, Servranckx and others he was a regular guest at Baroness Hélène de Mandrot’s Maison des Artistes, at her Château de La Sarraz, near Lausanne, where the First International Congress of Modern Architecture, the First Congress of Independent Cinema in 1929 and many other early 20th century revolutionary artistic manifestations were held. Hélène de Mandrot, like Katherine Dreier and Gertrude Stein, is one of the mainstays of modern art. In 1925, Flouquet founded the L’Assaut group with Gailliard and organised exhibitions under his aegis. As a leader of La Plastique Pure, he regularly exhibited abroad: Buenos Aires, Chicago, Leipzig, Madrid, Monza, New York, Paris, Philadelphia and Zurich; alone, in 1925 at the Der Sturm gallery and in 1927 at the Deutsche Werkbund in Stuttgart, founded by Henry van de Velde, who invited him. He designed many covers for the revolutionary art magazine Der Sturm. His work can be found in museums such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, the Museum of Ghent and the avant-garde Museum of Grenoble; it has been exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden, the Museum of Ghent and the Tate Modern in London, among others.

 

4 Bruno Gutensohn (German, 1895-1969)
Regenbogengarten, 1920s, oil on aluminum foil mounted on particle board
CRP185

Gutensohn was born in Munich and studied graphic art from 1913 to 1915 at the Munich Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Arts and Crafts) under Fritz Helmuth Ehmcke. He worked as a designer for various textile companies, such as Wallach, and after 1945 as an illustrator for numerous publishers in Munich. In 1932 he became a member of the Association of Revolutionary Visual Artists of Germany. He was the partner of the Korean writer Mirok Li, who died in 1950. He participated in the Art Institute of Chicago’s Second International Exhibition of Lithography and Wood Engraving (1930-1931). Much of his work was destroyed in the 1944 and 1945 bombing of Munich. The Lebachhaus Museum has 16 woodcuts by Gutensohn, some of them dated 1955, 1958 and 1966.

 

5 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Synthèse,1924, oil on canvas
CRP044

A painter, graphic artist and designer born in Antwerp. With Donas, Eemans, Flouquet, Léonard, Maes, Servranckx and Vantongerloo he forms the group of the first abstract artists of Belgium. In 1913 he entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, although he was most interested in personal experimentation. In 1914 he painted “Luminist” landscapes and portraits. In 1915-1917, inspired by Theosophy, he moved towards Symbolism. In 1918 he met Marinetti and joined the Futurist movement. With Van Dooren and Cockx he founded the Modern Art group in Antwerp, which established international contacts, for example with the Der Sturm gallery, Berlin’s avant-garde centre, and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He showed his first abstract painting in 1920. He took part in international exhibitions such as those in Geneva in 1921 and Budapest in 1924. He collaborated with avant-garde magazines such as Het Overzicht, which he co-founded in 1921, as well as De Driehoekin 1925, which supported constructivism. His work is in the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Ghent and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His work has been exhibited in museums around the world, such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

6 Arno Breker (German, 1900-1991)
Leopold III, king of the Belgians, 1930, plaster
CRP186

Born in Elberfeld (Germany). After studying sculpture and architecture, he began to make abstract sculptures, but soon moved on to classical and post-Cubist sculpture. In 1927 he went to Paris; he got involved with the avant-garde and established a friendship with Maillol. He studied the human body and began his long “classical period”. In 1932 he went to Italy to deepen his knowledge of ancient art; he returned in 1934, when the Nazis were already in power. He was opposed to the policy of “degenerate art” but carried on with his official commissions, which began in 1930. In 1937 he was professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Berlin and between 1938 and 1945 he collaborated with Albert Speer in Hitler’s plans for the new Berlin, with athletic and monumental sculptures for the new buildings. He also collaborated with architect Werner March on the grounds for the Nazi party assemblies in Nuremberg. In 1940, Stalin invited him to work in the USSR. In 1942 he exhibited in occupied Paris; in 1948 he was included in the denazification processes. He would continue to work in different styles until a later age. After his death, the Arno Breker Museum was founded in Nörwenich Castle, near Cologne and Bonn.

 

7 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour, gouache and graphite on paper
CRP130

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

 

8 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960) 
Untitled, c. 1923, painted cement
CRP043

 

9 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour on paper
CRP128

 

10 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled, c. 1920, watercolour on paper
CRP127

11 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974)
Untitled c. 1920, watercolour on paper
CRP129

12 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Rug, c. 1925, wool
CRP115

13 Marcel-Louis Baugniet (Belgian, 1896-1995)
Dining room set comprising a table and 6 chairs, 1927-28, chairs in chrmed steel with seats upholstered in imitation lamb’s wool, table in chromed steel with a wood and linoleum top 
CRP143 

Designed in 1927 and manufactured by the Les Anciennes Usines Annoye in 1928. In the 20’, the artist began to design furnitures, many of them made with metal tubes and polychrome lacquer with a cellulose basis. He took part in several Salons d’Automne in Paris. In 1930 he opened his design showroom in Brussels, where he attracted important personalities of the European avant-garde such as Kurt Schwitters and Paul Klee. In 1937, inspired by the furniture Silex (1905) by Gustave Serrurier-Bovy, he exhibited his pieces of furniture Standax, which the buyer could assemble and dismantle, at the Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne, in Paris. 

His biographer, Robert Vivier, described the design work by Baugniet as “a balance between aeshteticism and human y content”. As early as 1926, Baugniet, Henry van de Velde and Victor Servranckx published a design furniture project at the avant-garde Polish Blok. The experts agree that the first  tubular nickel-plated chair was designed by Marcel Breuer in 1926; Baugniet designed this tubular chair the following year and had it produced one more year after, and in this way he established himself in the avant-garde of tubular nickel-plated furniture. The same year 1927, Baugniet and his partner Ewaud Van Tonderen founded a company of furniture design in Brussels. Two years before he had created the Union des Artistes Modernes (UAM), the first French movement of Modernist design, which introduced this sort of furniture in France. Even though Baugniet wanted to democratise his designs, his customers were wealthy people; because of that, his tubular nickel-plated pieces of furniture are scarce. The artist designed two models of his chair: this one, less usual, with seats upholstered in imitation lamb’s wool, and the other, without upholstery.

14 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Peinture, 1922, oil on canvas 
CRP108

15 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Construction nº 43 (Peinture murale – B), 1925, oil on canvas 
CRP113

16 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (/French, 1900-1967)
Construction nº 29, 1925, oil on canvas 
CRP112

17 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 4 – 1927 (Cataclysme apprivoisé), oil on plywood
CRP089      

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

Signed and dated bottom right: SERVRANCKX.

In the original frame designed by the artist. Provenance: Victor Servranckx, Elewyt, Belgium; inherited by his son, Paul Servranckx, Brussels. Exhibited in 194, Servranckx, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels; 1950, La peinture belge contemporaine, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon; 1957, Homage à Servranckx à l’occasion de son soixantième anniversaire, Galerie “Les contemporains”, Brussels; 1958, L’Art du XXIe siècle, Palais des Expositions, Charleroi; 1958, Servranckx, pionier van de abstracte kunst, Concertgebouw, Bruges; 1958, Exposition Mobile, Peintures d’avant-garde, Galerie “Les contemporains”, Brussels; 1959, XXXVe Salon du Cercle Royal Artistique et Littéraire de Charleroi, Palais des Beaux-Arts, Charleroi;1959, Hassenhuis, Antwerp ;1960, The Arts of Belgium, Parke-Bernet Galleries ; 1962, XXXIe Biennale; 1963, Profile II – Belgische Kunst Heute, Städtische Kunstgalerie, Bochum;1963, Belgische Künstler von der Jahrhundertwende bis zur Gegenwart, Kunstgebäude am Schlossplatz Stuttgart, Stuttgart; 1965, Servranckx, Musée d’Ixelles, Ixelles;1970, Retrospectieve tentoonstelling Victor Servranckx 1897-1965, Provinciaal Begijnhof, Hasselt; 1989, Victor Servranckx 1897-1965 et l’art abstrait, Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels; 2013, Modernisme, L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe, Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Ghent, 2013.

18 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 14 – 1927, oil on canvas
CRP088

Signed and dated bottom left: SERVRANCKX 1927  

Provenance: Jacqueline Errera, Brussels; private collection (acquired from the prevoious one). Exhibited at the retrospective Servranckx, Musée d’Ixelles, Brussels, 1965, and at id. Victor Servranckx 1897 – 1965, Rubenskasteel, Elewijt, Belgium.

19 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 6 – 1933, Monstre marin féminin, oil on canvas
CRP092

20 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 14 – 1931, Le printemps passe dans le verger, oil on canvas
CRP090

Signed  and dated bottom left: SERVRANCKX 1931. On the stretcher there is a label with the title.

21 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 12 – 1920, oil on canvas
CRP080

22 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)

Opus 4 – 1953, Plastique Pure, later also titled by the artist Ascension vers le space or Sputnik, oil on canvas
CRP095

23 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 58 – 1923, oil on canvas
CRP083 

Signed and dated upper left: SERVRANCKX 1923  Exhibited in 2013 at Modernisme, L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe, Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Ghent, n° 4.88

24 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 4 – 1949, oil on canvas
CRP093

25Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 1 – 1921, patinated plaster
CRP081

STAIRS and ROOM 9

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

Vista de la sala 9, con obras de Ed Moses en primer plano.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Jan Vanriet, Salted Meat – Vive la Sociale!

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Carolyn Marks Blackwood, The Story Series.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Florette.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Wladimir Moszowski, Twilight 2.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Wladimir Moszowski, Twilight 1.

STAIRS

 

1 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Inside Out, 2013, glass and metal, in situ at exhibition Middle Gate, Geel, 2013
CRP314

Born in Oisterwijk (Holland). She studied at the Academy of Art and Design in Arnhem and at the Moller Instituut in Tilburg. She creates sculptures, installations, conceptual art and drawings. She represented Holland at the 1995 Venice Biennale. She has received important awards such as the Wilhelminaring for Dutch sculpture (2006) and the Singer Prijs (2009). Her work, the process of which has a marked artisan element (using ceramics, wood, glass, crochet), deals with issues such as growth, fertility, love, friendship, death and the rapid passing of everyday life. Branches, fruits, sunflowers, jars, breasts, seeds and shoes are common motifs in her pieces, which are often showcased outdoors. She regularly works with collaborators, including Nepalese embroiderers and master glassmakers from the Czech Republic. She considers her sculptures to be “tools for feelings”. Her work, included in numerous private collections, has been exhibited in spaces such as the Kunsthal KAdE in Amersfoort, the Croninger Museum and the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam.

 

2 Rafael Canogar (Spanish, 1935)
Foco, 2011, oil on canvas
CRP392

Born in Toledo; he studied with painter Daniel Vázquez Díaz (1949-1954). He was a founding member of the EL PASO group, 1957-1960. He was a member of the Advisory Board of the Directorate General of Fine Arts of the Ministry of Culture; of the Board of Trustees of the National Museum of Contemporary Art and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando, and a member of the Board of Directors of National Heritage; he obtained an honorary doctorate from UNED. He has participated in countless group exhibitions, in addition to his solo exhibitions, including several retrospectives since the seventies (National Museum of Contemporary Art, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Bochum Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts of Bilbao, Museum of Santa Cruz de Toledo, Reina Sofía Museum, National Museum of Warsaw, Museum of Fine Arts (Buenos Aires), IVAM, Antonio Pérez Foundation (Cuenca), Fenghuang (China). He has directed workshops and lectured in several European and American countries, participated on panels for international prizes and biennials, and received several prizes and distinctions, including: Gold Medal of the Community of Castile-La Mancha; Gold Medal for Merit in Fine Arts; XV Real Fundación Toledo Prize for his commitment to art and Toledo; National Engraving Prize, awarded by the National Chalcography (Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando), etc. His works can be found in many museums and public collections around the world: Contemporary Art Museums of Barcelona and Madrid, Spanish Abstract Art Museum (Cuenca), National Library (Madrid), Reina Sofia Museum, Israel Museum (Jerusalem), MoMA, Pasadena Art Museum, Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz-Staatliche Museum (Berlin), Hamburg Kunsthalle, Chicago Art Institute, Rufino Tamayo Museum (Mexico DF).

 

3 Werner Mannaers  (Belgian, 1954)
Very Cliché (Listening to Mendelssohn), 2014, mixed media on canvas

Born in Schoten (Belgium), he lives and works in Antwerp. His paintings are combined with texts in which he usually includes philosophical and other quotations and references to outstanding artists of the 20th century. Popular culture is very present in his work, which is based on personal references, with very characteristic touches of humour and a unique combination of the banal and the extraordinary. “My art is capricious, spontaneous, not serious, but at the same time tremendously sincere (…) My work is restless, provocative and self-critical,” he has affirmed. In 2008 he exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent. In 2014 and 2016 he showed his work in the Roberto Polo Gallery (Brussels). In 2016 he participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta. His projects include the publication of the book Love Letters, paintings made by the artist over the years, love letters to Natacha, his muse, in gouache on paper. Each piece, as usual with Mannaers, refers to other creators.

 

4 Carolyn Marks Blackwood (American, 1951)
The Story Series, She stood outside for what seemed like hours. It was time to be brave and go inside, 2013, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 3
CRP366

Born in Anchorage, Alaska, her family soon moved to New York. She graduated in art from Livingston College (Rutgers University, New Jersey). She worked as a singer, composer, scriptwriter and film producer before devoting herself to photography. In 2006 she was invited to participate in a group show at the Morton Library in Rhinebeck and her images of the Hudson River attracted curator Barbara Rose, who in 2007 included her in The magic hour (Paul Rodgers/9W Gallery, New York). Since then she has exhibited in museums and galleries in the USA and abroad. In 2015, Artnet News included her in its piece Five artist to watch: the photography edition. Her most recent exhibitions include On the edge (Von Lintel Gallery, Los Angeles, 2015) and The Story Series (Roberto Polo Gallery, Brussels, 2017). Her main source of inspiration is the stunning nature she sees from her home in Rhinecliff, on a cliff overlooking the Hudson and the Catskill Mountains. Influenced by abstract painting, she experiments with scale, deconstruction and a perspective that allows us to see the grandeur hidden in small details.

 

5 Carolyn Marks Blackwood (American, 1951)
The Story Series, Every night, he longed for her, 2016, impresión con tintas de pigmentos sobre papel fine art montado sobre Dibond, edición 3/rchival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 3
CRP366

 

ROOM 9

 

6 Victor, Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 1 – 1924 (Torse de jeune femme), artificial stone
CRP084

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

7 Victor, Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 1 – 1924 (Torse de jeune homme), artificial stone
CRP085

 

8 Jan Vanriet (belga/Belgian, 1948)
Salted Meat – Vive la Sociale!, 2014,  oil on canvas
CRP270

Image of mortality and metaphor of the human body and its physical reality, its strength and fragility, its vulnerability and helplessness. Like Paul Manes en Entry of Christ in New York (CRP250) drew inspiration from James Ensor’s Entry of Christ in Brussels, Vanriet, for the second part of its title he uses the motto in the big banner presiding over the demonstration that his fellow countryman’s painting takes up. 

 

9 Koen De Cock (Belgian,1978)
Vieillard, 2002, plaster, 
CRP289

Born in Ghent (Belgium), he is settled in his hometown, but he is currently working as an artist and art teacher in Shanghai. He graduated in sculpture from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, studied one year at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tianjin (China) and another at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tbilisi (Georgia) as a postgraduate student. In 2013, Shepherds, his first solo exhibition at the Roberto Polo Gallery, stood out for its original theme, both classical and unique, and a watercolour-on-paper technique combining rigour and imagination. He then presented its direct successor, Hermits & Wrestlers, oil paintings on canvas. Both titles allude to his favourite subject, the male nude struggling to merge with exuberant and boundless nature. He admires Dürer, Cranach the Elder and Paulus Pontius, artists influenced by Michelangelo; Pontius represented parts of the body in such an extreme and unreal way that they acquired a life of their own and became a model for later artists. De Cock copied them to understand Pontius’ anatomical transformations; this learning process required technical rigour to imitate the engraved line. His nudes are symbiotically and symbolically integrated into nature, their anatomy dismembered and often struggling violently with each other.

 

10 Koen De Cock (Belgian,1978)
Jeune homme, 2009, plaster
CRP290

 

11 Ed Moses (American, 1926-2018)
Rumbi, 2008, acrilic on canvas
CRP281

Born in Long Beach (California, USA). He served in the Medical Corps of theNavy during World War II and wanted to be a doctor, but later chose art. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago with Pedro Miller, who recognised his talent. He continued his training at the University of California, where he graduated. In 1958 he exhibited for the first time at the Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles). He was part of an active group of artists formed by Craig Kauffman, Billy Al Bengston, Robert Irwin, Edward Edward Kienholz, Ken Price, Ed Ruscha,  Bell, John Altoon and Wallace Berman, who overcame the limits of post-war art and shaped the incipient Los Angeles art scene. His work absorbs elements of various avant-garde activities, but mainly abstraction based on process and geometric repetition. His best-known pieces include his Rose drawings. In 1978 he converted to Buddhism and made the concept of living the moment the key to his work, emphasising the importance of chance and circumstances. In 1980 he received a Guggenheim scholarship. In 1996 he held a retrospective at the Contemporary Art Museum in Los Angeles, in whose County Art Museum an exhibition of his drawings from the 1960s and 1970s was presented in 2015. In addition to these institutions, his works can be found in the Centre Pompidou, MoMA and the Los Angeles County Museum, among others.

 

12 Ed Moses (American, 1926-2018)
Dog-Flip, 2009, acrylic on canvas
CRP280

 

13 Roberto Caracciolo (Italian, 1960)
Anyday (the first of four paintings from the cycle The Dark Night, Maybe), 1992, oil on canvas
CRP279

Born in New York, he lives and works in Rome. He studied at the Urbino Art Institute and at the Studio School in New York; in the early 80s he worked as an assistant stage designer with Dante Ferreti. He has been a professor or lecturer at the Academies of Fine Arts and other institutions in Turin, Perugia, Siena, Venice, New York, Chicago, Rome and Montecastello di Vibio. Between 1999 and 2013 he was adjunct professor at New York University in Florence; between 2007 and 2010, Arts Liaison at the American Academy in Rome, where he organised exhibitions.

 

14 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Francisco, 2012, cedar, paper and iron
CRP346

Born in Lyon (France). In 1995 she graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where she has lived and worked since 1989. Her sculptures are mainly made of wood and bronze; they are monumental pieces, often evoking sensuality and violence. She also uses iron, paper and painted glass beads. Her works and installations, as indicated on her website, “speak with delicacy and strength of a world that is not what it seems and where her sculptures come to life gradually to tell a story that leaves no one unmoved”. She began exhibiting in 1996 and since then her production has regularly been shown in galleries and museums in Belgium, Paris, Geneva and Lyon. In 2005, after overcoming cancer, her sculpture depicted vital organs such as the heart, and she created a “crying machine”. Until 2011 she taught classical sculpture at her academy La ligne d’horizon.

 

15 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Seta, 2012, cedar and paper
CRP347

 

16 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Simon, 2012, oak and iron
CRP348

 

17 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Cuba, la lucha, Trinidad, 2015, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 5
CRP329

Born in Schoten (Antwerp, Belgium). He studied photography at the Ghent Academy. In 1982 he began his career as a freelance photographer and was one of the founders of the XYZ photo gallery. From 1982 and 1989 he taught at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent, at the Higher Institute of Fine Arts in Antwerp and at the School of Decorative Arts in Paris. In 1994 he joined the Magnum agency. In the triptych Trinity (2007) he deals with power and violence in the world; his Congo (2009) reflects the spirit of the country before its independence; with Moments before the flood (2012) he warns of the dangers of global warming: in the series Cuba, the struggle (2015), exhibited in the Roberto Polo gallery (Brussels), he analyses the slow transition from communism to a more capitalist mentality. He has also witnessed the labour camps of Siberia, daily life in India, Russia before and after the fall of the Wall and juvenile delinquency in Flanders. He has received the Arles Festival Book Award (1990), and the W. Eugene Smith (1990) and Kodak (1992) awards. In 2012 he was elected a member of the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences of Brussels. His work is exhibited in galleries and museums all over the world.

 

18 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Cuba, la lucha, La Habana, 2015, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 5
CRP329

 

19 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Roberto Polo, Brussels, 2016, unique archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond
CRP330

 

20 Deborah Turbeville (American, 1932-2013)
Roberto Polo, New York, 1976, unique silver gelatin print
CRP231

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. At the age of 19 she travelled to New York with the hope of becoming a dancer or actress, but met designer Claire McCardell, with whom she began to collaborate. In 1963 she worked as a fashion editor for the first time at Harper’s Bazaar magazine. She came into contact with photography by chance, but she managed to transform it into avant-garde art; she switched from catwalks and advertising to art galleries. Known for her blurred technique, she surprised with the Bath House series(Vogue, 1975), where the models appear in bathing suits in a public toilet, blurred and languid. In 1978 she published in the same magazine the images of Women in the Woods, the result of a commission for Valentino, a fashion designer for whom she was working, advertising the spring-summer 2012 collection, in Mexico. Brands such as Chanel, Oscar de la Renta, Ungaro, Yamamoto or Comme des Garçons requested her for their campaigns. In 2007 she travelled around Europe, taking snapshots of peculiar people and places.

 

21 Wladimir Moszowski (Belgian, 1949)
Twilight, 2014, oil on canvas – 1 and 2
CRP368

Born in Genk (Belgium). His work has a marked autobiographical character. Born in Belgium to a Ukrainian father, he experienced the paradox of being a Belgian with a Ukrainian surname, an identity crisis that led him into a cultural conflict. These experiences have led him to create a parallel world. Through therapy and work with the subconscious he gained access to his “Void”: the loss of identity transformed into the “Sublime Void”, a place where a staging of identity, history and fantasy could take place. His paintings create that parallel world, in which he can take on whatever role and form he wants, change his identity, gender or age, represent situations from the past, remake them and create new ones. The search for identity is over; his “Sublime Void” is his identity. His art is a private ritual to protect personal and cultural duality. The ancient wisdom of alchemy thus constitutes his guiding principle in art. His search for his identity and his place as a human being take the form of a complex project of total art, of a personal mythology; alchemical terms such as separatio and coniunctio (separation and union of elements to arrive at a fundamental entity) are translated conceptually and expressively by the artist in texts, drawings and spatial installations. In addition to many group exhibitions since 1972 (Belgium, Germany, Russia, Poland, USA, etc.), since 1979 he has held numerous solo exhibitions in Belgian and Dutch galleries and cultural centres, and carried out four art projects in public spaces between 1993 and 2001.

 

22 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Black Breasts (Glitter), 2017, glass and cord
CRP317

Born in Oisterwijk (Holland). She studied at the Academy of Art and Design in Arnhem and at the Moller Instituut in Tilburg. She creates sculptures, installations, conceptual art and drawings. She represented Holland at the 1995 Venice Biennale. She has received important awards such as the Wilhelminaring for Dutch sculpture (2006) and the Singer Prijs (2009). Her work, the process of which has a marked artisan element (using ceramics, wood, glass, crochet), deals with issues such as growth, fertility, love, friendship, death and the rapid passing of everyday life. Branches, fruits, sunflowers, jars, breasts, seeds and shoes are common motifs in her pieces, which are often showcased outdoors. She regularly works with collaborators, including Nepalese embroiderers and master glassmakers from the Czech Republic. She considers her sculptures to be “tools for feelings”. Her work, included in numerous private collections, has been exhibited in spaces such as the Kunsthal KAdE in Amersfoort, the Croninger Museum and the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam.

 

23 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Pink Breasts, 2017, glass and cord 

 

24 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Glass Colours, 2014, gold leaf on painted wooden doors
CRP315

 

25 Lois Lane (American, 1948)
Moon Shadow, 2010, /oil on canvas
CRP331

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was educated in the Philadelphia College of Art and earned a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University in 1971. She worked as Jasper Johns’ assistant. Like Susan Rothenberg or Jennifer Bartlett, she was part of a post-minimalist generation that “sought to return figurative images to painting without falling into realism”, according to critic Deborah Solomon. Her work highlights the poetic use of images, recognisable but mysterious, that sometimes seem to emerge from the unconscious. Fans, birds, plants, animals and clothing are juxtaposed against flat, neutral backgrounds. According to Judith Stein, coordinator of the William Morris Gallery (United Kingdom), “her motifs are archetypal, apparently drawn from rituals, memories and dreams”. In 1978 Lane was one of the protagonists of the exhibition New image painting, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and in 2016 she appeared with other North American artists (Walter Darby Bannard, Karen Gunderson, Martin Kline, Melissa Kretschmer, Paul Manes, Ed Moses and Larry Poons) in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta.

 

26 Joris Ghekiere (Belgian, 1955-2016)
Sin título, 2016, oil on canvas
CRP325

Born in Kortrijk (Flanders, Belgium). He was awarded the European Prize (Ostende) in 1980 and 1984 and the Jeune Peinture Belge Prize (Brussels) in 1985 and 1986. He completed projects in public spaces in several Belgian cities between 1997 and 2016. His numerous solo and group exhibitions include those held in galleries in Dubai, Brussels, Amsterdam, London and Antwerp (2010), Mechelen (2011), Louvain and Mechelen (2012), Antwerp (2014) and Ghent (2015). In 2016 he presented his drawings in Ostende and participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta. In 2015, at the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst (SMAK) in Ghent, he presented the exhibition Tomorrow, consisting of paintings, mural paintings and installations with wallpaper. He explored a great diversity of techniques and styles and did not commit to a certain way of doing things, which resulted in works in which the figurative and the abstract influenced each other. He often started the process by placing the canvas on a turntable to create concentric circles using spray paint. A more recent group of his paintings is related to instability. By integrating dislocated spaces and figures of dislocation, he organises his own pictorial world, nourished by the interrelation between visualisation and visualised objects.

 

27 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
L’invitation au voyage, 1988, oil and charcoal on canvas,1988
CRP264

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1971 he became the youngest member of the editorial board of political magazine De Nieuwe Maand. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels and Paris (1082) and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

28 Xavier Noiret-Thomé (French, 1971)
Donky et Spanza (ready-made), 2007-08, galvanised metal, plastic, cement, wood, wheels
CRP306

Born in Charleville-Mezières (France). He lives and works in Brussels. He studied at the Regional School of Fine Arts in Rennes and since 1995 as an artist-in-residence at the Domaine in Kerguéhennec contemporary art centre and at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam. His work moves between the figurative and the abstract and is characterised by diversity, the mixing of influences and research into genres and styles. In 2001 he was awarded the Belgian Young Painting Prize and in 2005 he began a residency in Villa Medici, after winning an award at the French Academy in Rome. In 2011 he designed the stained glass windows for the church of Saint Thomas in Vaulx-en-Velin (France). His most recent solo exhibitions include La parade des cannibales (Les filles du Calvaire gallery, Paris, 2009); Bloated faces & Pop-up (AD, Athens, 2013); Cosmogony (Museum van Deinze en Leiestreek, Deinze, 2015) and The quiet struggle (Roberto Polo Gallery, Brussels). He participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, in the Vanderborght of Brussels(2016) and the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta (2017).

 

29 Bruno Ceccobelli (Italian, 1952)
Giovin Marmo, 2018, marble
CRP293

Born in Montecastello di Vibio (Italy). Painter and sculptor, he lives and works in Todi. He was one of the six founders of the Nuova Scuola Romana or Scuola di San Lorenzo, a movement that arose from Arte Povera and Transavantgarde art in the late 20th century; in the early 80s he settled with other artists in a large abandoned industrial space in the San Lorenzo district of Rome. In 1984 he gave a training course at the National School of Fine Arts in Senegal, which came to be a very important experience for him. In 2003 he published a collection of essays on his desire for a future aesthetic society. In 2009 he held a retrospective on the San Lorenzo group in Rovereto. Over all these years, he has participated in several exhibitions in Italy and abroad.

 

30 Bruno Ceccobelli (Italian, 1952)
Signora Pietra, 2018, marble
CRP294

 

31 Jacques-Henri Lartigue (/French, 1894-1986)
Florette, 1944, silver gelatine print
CRP078

Born in Liège (Belgium). He studied drawing at the Academy of Fine Arts in his native city; he graduated in typography and worked as a specialist in technical drawing after World War I. In 1920, he joined the Groupe Moderne d’Art, promoted by Belgian writer and essayist Georges Linze, as was the magazine Anthologie, to spread the new avant-garde trends. He made illustrations and engravings for books, but in the end he would follow the path of abstraction. In 1922 he befriended Czech painter and graphic artist Frantisek Kupka. In 1923 he settled in Lille and joined avant-garde intellectuals such as painter Felix del Marle and writers Émile Donce-Brisy and Charles Rochat, with whom he collaborated in the literature and art magazine Vouloir. Between 1945 and 1958 he lived in Paris; he took part in exhibitions at the Salon des Réalités Nouvelles with his characteristic geometric compositions of circles, spirals and stars. In 1976, his vision was affected following a cataract operation but he continued to paint until the end of his life, using coloured pencils on cardboard. In 1985 a retrospective was held at the Museum of Modern Art in Villeneuve d’Ascq (Lille). His work is conserved at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium.

 

32 Jacques-Henri Lartigue (French, 1894-1986)
Après avoir été tant de fois le spectateur vais-je pouvoir devenir l’acteur, 1918, unique silver gelatine print and ink
CRP077

STAIRS and ROOM 9

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 9, with Ed Moses works in the foreground.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Jan Vanriet, Salted Meat – Vive la Sociale!

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Carolyn Marks Blackwood, The Story Series.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Florette.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Wladimir Moszowski, Twilight 2.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Wladimir Moszowski, Twilight 1.

STAIRS and ROOM 9

 

1 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Inside Out, 2013, glass and metal, in situ at exhibition Middle Gate, Geel, 2013
CRP314

Born in Oisterwijk (Holland). She studied at the Academy of Art and Design in Arnhem and at the Moller Instituut in Tilburg. She creates sculptures, installations, conceptual art and drawings. She represented Holland at the 1995 Venice Biennale. She has received important awards such as the Wilhelminaring for Dutch sculpture (2006) and the Singer Prijs (2009). Her work, the process of which has a marked artisan element (using ceramics, wood, glass, crochet), deals with issues such as growth, fertility, love, friendship, death and the rapid passing of everyday life. Branches, fruits, sunflowers, jars, breasts, seeds and shoes are common motifs in her pieces, which are often showcased outdoors. She regularly works with collaborators, including Nepalese embroiderers and master glassmakers from the Czech Republic. She considers her sculptures to be “tools for feelings”. Her work, included in numerous private collections, has been exhibited in spaces such as the Kunsthal KAdE in Amersfoort, the Croninger Museum and the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam.

 

2 Rafael Canogar (Spanish, 1935)
Foco, 2011, oil on canvas
CRP392

Born in Toledo; he studied with painter Daniel Vázquez Díaz (1949-1954). He was a founding member of the EL PASO group, 1957-1960. He was a member of the Advisory Board of the Directorate General of Fine Arts of the Ministry of Culture; of the Board of Trustees of the National Museum of Contemporary Art and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando, and a member of the Board of Directors of National Heritage; he obtained an honorary doctorate from UNED. He has participated in countless group exhibitions, in addition to his solo exhibitions, including several retrospectives since the seventies (National Museum of Contemporary Art, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Bochum Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts of Bilbao, Museum of Santa Cruz de Toledo, Reina Sofía Museum, National Museum of Warsaw, Museum of Fine Arts (Buenos Aires), IVAM, Antonio Pérez Foundation (Cuenca), Fenghuang (China). He has directed workshops and lectured in several European and American countries, participated on panels for international prizes and biennials, and received several prizes and distinctions, including: Gold Medal of the Community of Castile-La Mancha; Gold Medal for Merit in Fine Arts; XV Real Fundación Toledo Prize for his commitment to art and Toledo; National Engraving Prize, awarded by the National Chalcography (Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando), etc. His works can be found in many museums and public collections around the world: Contemporary Art Museums of Barcelona and Madrid, Spanish Abstract Art Museum (Cuenca), National Library (Madrid), Reina Sofia Museum, Israel Museum (Jerusalem), MoMA, Pasadena Art Museum, Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz-Staatliche Museum (Berlin), Hamburg Kunsthalle, Chicago Art Institute, Rufino Tamayo Museum (Mexico DF).

 

3 Werner Mannaers  (Belgian, 1954)
Very Cliché (Listening to Mendelssohn), 2014, mixed media on canvas

Born in Schoten (Belgium), he lives and works in Antwerp. His paintings are combined with texts in which he usually includes philosophical and other quotations and references to outstanding artists of the 20th century. Popular culture is very present in his work, which is based on personal references, with very characteristic touches of humour and a unique combination of the banal and the extraordinary. “My art is capricious, spontaneous, not serious, but at the same time tremendously sincere (…) My work is restless, provocative and self-critical,” he has affirmed. In 2008 he exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst in Ghent. In 2014 and 2016 he showed his work in the Roberto Polo Gallery (Brussels). In 2016 he participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta. His projects include the publication of the book Love Letters, paintings made by the artist over the years, love letters to Natacha, his muse, in gouache on paper. Each piece, as usual with Mannaers, refers to other creators.

 

4 Carolyn Marks Blackwood (American, 1951)
The Story Series, She stood outside for what seemed like hours. It was time to be brave and go inside, 2013, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 3
CRP366

Born in Anchorage, Alaska, her family soon moved to New York. She graduated in art from Livingston College (Rutgers University, New Jersey). She worked as a singer, composer, scriptwriter and film producer before devoting herself to photography. In 2006 she was invited to participate in a group show at the Morton Library in Rhinebeck and her images of the Hudson River attracted curator Barbara Rose, who in 2007 included her in The magic hour (Paul Rodgers/9W Gallery, New York). Since then she has exhibited in museums and galleries in the USA and abroad. In 2015, Artnet News included her in its piece Five artist to watch: the photography edition. Her most recent exhibitions include On the edge (Von Lintel Gallery, Los Angeles, 2015) and The Story Series (Roberto Polo Gallery, Brussels, 2017). Her main source of inspiration is the stunning nature she sees from her home in Rhinecliff, on a cliff overlooking the Hudson and the Catskill Mountains. Influenced by abstract painting, she experiments with scale, deconstruction and a perspective that allows us to see the grandeur hidden in small details.

 

5 Carolyn Marks Blackwood (American, 1951)
The Story Series, Every night, he longed for her, 2016, impresión con tintas de pigmentos sobre papel fine art montado sobre Dibond, edición 3/rchival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 3
CRP366

 

ROOM 9

 

6 Victor, Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 1 – 1924 (Torse de jeune femme), artificial stone
CRP084

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

7 Victor, Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 1 – 1924 (Torse de jeune homme), artificial stone
CRP085

 

8 Jan Vanriet (belga/Belgian, 1948)
Salted Meat – Vive la Sociale!, 2014,  oil on canvas
CRP270

Image of mortality and metaphor of the human body and its physical reality, its strength and fragility, its vulnerability and helplessness. Like Paul Manes en Entry of Christ in New York (CRP250) drew inspiration from James Ensor’s Entry of Christ in Brussels, Vanriet, for the second part of its title he uses the motto in the big banner presiding over the demonstration that his fellow countryman’s painting takes up. 

 

9 Koen De Cock (Belgian,1978)
Vieillard, 2002, plaster, 
CRP289

Born in Ghent (Belgium), he is settled in his hometown, but he is currently working as an artist and art teacher in Shanghai. He graduated in sculpture from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, studied one year at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tianjin (China) and another at the Academy of Fine Arts in Tbilisi (Georgia) as a postgraduate student. In 2013, Shepherds, his first solo exhibition at the Roberto Polo Gallery, stood out for its original theme, both classical and unique, and a watercolour-on-paper technique combining rigour and imagination. He then presented its direct successor, Hermits & Wrestlers, oil paintings on canvas. Both titles allude to his favourite subject, the male nude struggling to merge with exuberant and boundless nature. He admires Dürer, Cranach the Elder and Paulus Pontius, artists influenced by Michelangelo; Pontius represented parts of the body in such an extreme and unreal way that they acquired a life of their own and became a model for later artists. De Cock copied them to understand Pontius’ anatomical transformations; this learning process required technical rigour to imitate the engraved line. His nudes are symbiotically and symbolically integrated into nature, their anatomy dismembered and often struggling violently with each other.

 

10 Koen De Cock (Belgian,1978)
Jeune homme, 2009, plaster
CRP290

 

11 Ed Moses (American, 1926-2018)
Rumbi, 2008, acrilic on canvas
CRP281

Born in Long Beach (California, USA). He served in the Medical Corps of theNavy during World War II and wanted to be a doctor, but later chose art. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago with Pedro Miller, who recognised his talent. He continued his training at the University of California, where he graduated. In 1958 he exhibited for the first time at the Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles). He was part of an active group of artists formed by Craig Kauffman, Billy Al Bengston, Robert Irwin, Edward Edward Kienholz, Ken Price, Ed Ruscha,  Bell, John Altoon and Wallace Berman, who overcame the limits of post-war art and shaped the incipient Los Angeles art scene. His work absorbs elements of various avant-garde activities, but mainly abstraction based on process and geometric repetition. His best-known pieces include his Rose drawings. In 1978 he converted to Buddhism and made the concept of living the moment the key to his work, emphasising the importance of chance and circumstances. In 1980 he received a Guggenheim scholarship. In 1996 he held a retrospective at the Contemporary Art Museum in Los Angeles, in whose County Art Museum an exhibition of his drawings from the 1960s and 1970s was presented in 2015. In addition to these institutions, his works can be found in the Centre Pompidou, MoMA and the Los Angeles County Museum, among others.

 

12 Ed Moses (American, 1926-2018)
Dog-Flip, 2009, acrylic on canvas
CRP280

 

13 Roberto Caracciolo (Italian, 1960)
Anyday (the first of four paintings from the cycle The Dark Night, Maybe), 1992, oil on canvas
CRP279

Born in New York, he lives and works in Rome. He studied at the Urbino Art Institute and at the Studio School in New York; in the early 80s he worked as an assistant stage designer with Dante Ferreti. He has been a professor or lecturer at the Academies of Fine Arts and other institutions in Turin, Perugia, Siena, Venice, New York, Chicago, Rome and Montecastello di Vibio. Between 1999 and 2013 he was adjunct professor at New York University in Florence; between 2007 and 2010, Arts Liaison at the American Academy in Rome, where he organised exhibitions.

 

14 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Francisco, 2012, cedar, paper and iron
CRP346

Born in Lyon (France). In 1995 she graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where she has lived and worked since 1989. Her sculptures are mainly made of wood and bronze; they are monumental pieces, often evoking sensuality and violence. She also uses iron, paper and painted glass beads. Her works and installations, as indicated on her website, “speak with delicacy and strength of a world that is not what it seems and where her sculptures come to life gradually to tell a story that leaves no one unmoved”. She began exhibiting in 1996 and since then her production has regularly been shown in galleries and museums in Belgium, Paris, Geneva and Lyon. In 2005, after overcoming cancer, her sculpture depicted vital organs such as the heart, and she created a “crying machine”. Until 2011 she taught classical sculpture at her academy La ligne d’horizon.

 

15 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Seta, 2012, cedar and paper
CRP347

 

16 Annabelle Hyvrier (French, 1971)
Simon, 2012, oak and iron
CRP348

 

17 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Cuba, la lucha, Trinidad, 2015, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 5
CRP329

Born in Schoten (Antwerp, Belgium). He studied photography at the Ghent Academy. In 1982 he began his career as a freelance photographer and was one of the founders of the XYZ photo gallery. From 1982 and 1989 he taught at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent, at the Higher Institute of Fine Arts in Antwerp and at the School of Decorative Arts in Paris. In 1994 he joined the Magnum agency. In the triptych Trinity (2007) he deals with power and violence in the world; his Congo (2009) reflects the spirit of the country before its independence; with Moments before the flood (2012) he warns of the dangers of global warming: in the series Cuba, the struggle (2015), exhibited in the Roberto Polo gallery (Brussels), he analyses the slow transition from communism to a more capitalist mentality. He has also witnessed the labour camps of Siberia, daily life in India, Russia before and after the fall of the Wall and juvenile delinquency in Flanders. He has received the Arles Festival Book Award (1990), and the W. Eugene Smith (1990) and Kodak (1992) awards. In 2012 he was elected a member of the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences of Brussels. His work is exhibited in galleries and museums all over the world.

 

18 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Cuba, la lucha, La Habana, 2015, archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond, edition 5
CRP329

 

19 Carl de Keyzer (Belgian, 1958)
Roberto Polo, Brussels, 2016, unique archival pigment print on fine art paper mounted on Dibond
CRP330

 

20 Deborah Turbeville (American, 1932-2013)
Roberto Polo, New York, 1976, unique silver gelatin print
CRP231

Born in Boston, Massachusetts. At the age of 19 she travelled to New York with the hope of becoming a dancer or actress, but met designer Claire McCardell, with whom she began to collaborate. In 1963 she worked as a fashion editor for the first time at Harper’s Bazaar magazine. She came into contact with photography by chance, but she managed to transform it into avant-garde art; she switched from catwalks and advertising to art galleries. Known for her blurred technique, she surprised with the Bath House series(Vogue, 1975), where the models appear in bathing suits in a public toilet, blurred and languid. In 1978 she published in the same magazine the images of Women in the Woods, the result of a commission for Valentino, a fashion designer for whom she was working, advertising the spring-summer 2012 collection, in Mexico. Brands such as Chanel, Oscar de la Renta, Ungaro, Yamamoto or Comme des Garçons requested her for their campaigns. In 2007 she travelled around Europe, taking snapshots of peculiar people and places.

 

21 Wladimir Moszowski (Belgian, 1949)
Twilight, 2014, oil on canvas – 1 and 2
CRP368

Born in Genk (Belgium). His work has a marked autobiographical character. Born in Belgium to a Ukrainian father, he experienced the paradox of being a Belgian with a Ukrainian surname, an identity crisis that led him into a cultural conflict. These experiences have led him to create a parallel world. Through therapy and work with the subconscious he gained access to his “Void”: the loss of identity transformed into the “Sublime Void”, a place where a staging of identity, history and fantasy could take place. His paintings create that parallel world, in which he can take on whatever role and form he wants, change his identity, gender or age, represent situations from the past, remake them and create new ones. The search for identity is over; his “Sublime Void” is his identity. His art is a private ritual to protect personal and cultural duality. The ancient wisdom of alchemy thus constitutes his guiding principle in art. His search for his identity and his place as a human being take the form of a complex project of total art, of a personal mythology; alchemical terms such as separatio and coniunctio (separation and union of elements to arrive at a fundamental entity) are translated conceptually and expressively by the artist in texts, drawings and spatial installations. In addition to many group exhibitions since 1972 (Belgium, Germany, Russia, Poland, USA, etc.), since 1979 he has held numerous solo exhibitions in Belgian and Dutch galleries and cultural centres, and carried out four art projects in public spaces between 1993 and 2001.

 

22 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Black Breasts (Glitter), 2017, glass and cord
CRP317

Born in Oisterwijk (Holland). She studied at the Academy of Art and Design in Arnhem and at the Moller Instituut in Tilburg. She creates sculptures, installations, conceptual art and drawings. She represented Holland at the 1995 Venice Biennale. She has received important awards such as the Wilhelminaring for Dutch sculpture (2006) and the Singer Prijs (2009). Her work, the process of which has a marked artisan element (using ceramics, wood, glass, crochet), deals with issues such as growth, fertility, love, friendship, death and the rapid passing of everyday life. Branches, fruits, sunflowers, jars, breasts, seeds and shoes are common motifs in her pieces, which are often showcased outdoors. She regularly works with collaborators, including Nepalese embroiderers and master glassmakers from the Czech Republic. She considers her sculptures to be “tools for feelings”. Her work, included in numerous private collections, has been exhibited in spaces such as the Kunsthal KAdE in Amersfoort, the Croninger Museum and the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam.

 

23 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Pink Breasts, 2017, glass and cord 

 

24 Maria Roosen (Dutch, 1957)
Glass Colours, 2014, gold leaf on painted wooden doors
CRP315

 

25 Lois Lane (American, 1948)
Moon Shadow, 2010, /oil on canvas
CRP331

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was educated in the Philadelphia College of Art and earned a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University in 1971. She worked as Jasper Johns’ assistant. Like Susan Rothenberg or Jennifer Bartlett, she was part of a post-minimalist generation that “sought to return figurative images to painting without falling into realism”, according to critic Deborah Solomon. Her work highlights the poetic use of images, recognisable but mysterious, that sometimes seem to emerge from the unconscious. Fans, birds, plants, animals and clothing are juxtaposed against flat, neutral backgrounds. According to Judith Stein, coordinator of the William Morris Gallery (United Kingdom), “her motifs are archetypal, apparently drawn from rituals, memories and dreams”. In 1978 Lane was one of the protagonists of the exhibition New image painting, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and in 2016 she appeared with other North American artists (Walter Darby Bannard, Karen Gunderson, Martin Kline, Melissa Kretschmer, Paul Manes, Ed Moses and Larry Poons) in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta.

 

26 Joris Ghekiere (Belgian, 1955-2016)
Sin título, 2016, oil on canvas
CRP325

Born in Kortrijk (Flanders, Belgium). He was awarded the European Prize (Ostende) in 1980 and 1984 and the Jeune Peinture Belge Prize (Brussels) in 1985 and 1986. He completed projects in public spaces in several Belgian cities between 1997 and 2016. His numerous solo and group exhibitions include those held in galleries in Dubai, Brussels, Amsterdam, London and Antwerp (2010), Mechelen (2011), Louvain and Mechelen (2012), Antwerp (2014) and Ghent (2015). In 2016 he presented his drawings in Ostende and participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta. In 2015, at the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst (SMAK) in Ghent, he presented the exhibition Tomorrow, consisting of paintings, mural paintings and installations with wallpaper. He explored a great diversity of techniques and styles and did not commit to a certain way of doing things, which resulted in works in which the figurative and the abstract influenced each other. He often started the process by placing the canvas on a turntable to create concentric circles using spray paint. A more recent group of his paintings is related to instability. By integrating dislocated spaces and figures of dislocation, he organises his own pictorial world, nourished by the interrelation between visualisation and visualised objects.

 

27 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
L’invitation au voyage, 1988, oil and charcoal on canvas,1988
CRP264

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1971 he became the youngest member of the editorial board of political magazine De Nieuwe Maand. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels and Paris (1082) and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

28 Xavier Noiret-Thomé (French, 1971)
Donky et Spanza (ready-made), 2007-08, galvanised metal, plastic, cement, wood, wheels
CRP306

Born in Charleville-Mezières (France). He lives and works in Brussels. He studied at the Regional School of Fine Arts in Rennes and since 1995 as an artist-in-residence at the Domaine in Kerguéhennec contemporary art centre and at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam. His work moves between the figurative and the abstract and is characterised by diversity, the mixing of influences and research into genres and styles. In 2001 he was awarded the Belgian Young Painting Prize and in 2005 he began a residency in Villa Medici, after winning an award at the French Academy in Rome. In 2011 he designed the stained glass windows for the church of Saint Thomas in Vaulx-en-Velin (France). His most recent solo exhibitions include La parade des cannibales (Les filles du Calvaire gallery, Paris, 2009); Bloated faces & Pop-up (AD, Athens, 2013); Cosmogony (Museum van Deinze en Leiestreek, Deinze, 2015) and The quiet struggle (Roberto Polo Gallery, Brussels). He participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, in the Vanderborght of Brussels(2016) and the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta (2017).

 

29 Bruno Ceccobelli (Italian, 1952)
Giovin Marmo, 2018, marble
CRP293

Born in Montecastello di Vibio (Italy). Painter and sculptor, he lives and works in Todi. He was one of the six founders of the Nuova Scuola Romana or Scuola di San Lorenzo, a movement that arose from Arte Povera and Transavantgarde art in the late 20th century; in the early 80s he settled with other artists in a large abandoned industrial space in the San Lorenzo district of Rome. In 1984 he gave a training course at the National School of Fine Arts in Senegal, which came to be a very important experience for him. In 2003 he published a collection of essays on his desire for a future aesthetic society. In 2009 he held a retrospective on the San Lorenzo group in Rovereto. Over all these years, he has participated in several exhibitions in Italy and abroad.

 

30 Bruno Ceccobelli (Italian, 1952)
Signora Pietra, 2018, marble
CRP294

 

31 Jacques-Henri Lartigue (/French, 1894-1986)
Florette, 1944, silver gelatine print
CRP078

Born in Liège (Belgium). He studied drawing at the Academy of Fine Arts in his native city; he graduated in typography and worked as a specialist in technical drawing after World War I. In 1920, he joined the Groupe Moderne d’Art, promoted by Belgian writer and essayist Georges Linze, as was the magazine Anthologie, to spread the new avant-garde trends. He made illustrations and engravings for books, but in the end he would follow the path of abstraction. In 1922 he befriended Czech painter and graphic artist Frantisek Kupka. In 1923 he settled in Lille and joined avant-garde intellectuals such as painter Felix del Marle and writers Émile Donce-Brisy and Charles Rochat, with whom he collaborated in the literature and art magazine Vouloir. Between 1945 and 1958 he lived in Paris; he took part in exhibitions at the Salon des Réalités Nouvelles with his characteristic geometric compositions of circles, spirals and stars. In 1976, his vision was affected following a cataract operation but he continued to paint until the end of his life, using coloured pencils on cardboard. In 1985 a retrospective was held at the Museum of Modern Art in Villeneuve d’Ascq (Lille). His work is conserved at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium.

 

32 Jacques-Henri Lartigue (French, 1894-1986)
Après avoir été tant de fois le spectateur vais-je pouvoir devenir l’acteur, 1918, unique silver gelatine print and ink
CRP077

ROOM 10

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 10 with sculptures by Marc Eemans in the foreground.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Roger Van Gindertael, Les trois jongleurs.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Karl Hofer, Agnuzzo (Ticino).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Prosper De Troyer, Critics and Advocates.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Sam Dillemans, Self-Portrait.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Honoré Daumier, Conversations d’avocats or Deux avocats.

ROOM 10

 

1 William Wauer (German, 1866-1962)
Masken, c. 1930, oil on canvas
CRP139

Born in Oberwiesenthal (Saxony, Germany). He studied at the Academy in Dresden and then in Berlin and Munich. After 1888 he lived in San Francisco, New York, Vienna, Rome, Leipzig… He was an editor, art critic, publisher and illustrator; he published the monthly magazine Quickborn. After 1900 he devoted himself to theatre. In 1912 he joined Der Sturm (in 1918 he exhibited his sculptures) and began working as a film director with films such as Richard Wagner (1913) and Der Tunnel (1914-1915). He was best known for Expressionist works such as the monumental bust of Herwarth Walden, a symbol of the formal radicalism of German modernism. In 1924 he founded the Internationale Vereinigung der Expressionisten, Kubisten, Futuristen und Konstruktivisten, banned in 1933. In 1941 the Nazis classified his art as “degenerate” and he was forbidden to practice; he would not exhibit his sculptures, paintings and engravings until after the war. He taught at the adult education centre in West Berlin and was a member of the board of directors of the Verband der Berliner Bildenden Künstler. In 2011 the William Wauer und der Berliner Kubismus exhibition was presented at the Georg Kolbe Museum (Berlin); in 2016, the Kunstmuseum Bern included him in Modern master: Degenerate art.

 

2 Edmond van Dooren (Belgian, 1896-1965)
Self-Portrait, 1917, oil on canvas
CRP061

A painter and graphic designer, he is born in Antwerp. In 1911 he entered the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, where he surprised with his daring use of colour. His first works, from 1914, are Impressionist landscapes en plein air. But he was more interested in form than content; in the Academy he befriended Jozef Peeters and in 1916-1919 they found a shared passion for depicting futuristic metropolises, in paintings prefiguring the images of the film Metropolis by Fritz Lang (1927). They also developed a kind of Symbolist and Romantic style related to their worship of Wagner’s music. Influenced by Robert Delaunay, Van Dooren’s work became increasingly abstract. In 1918 he founded with Peeters the Modern Art group, with the participation of Cockx, Léonard and Maes; they made contact with Der Sturm and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He used the linocut technique, which favours geometric abstraction. However, his art evolved towards visions of a futuristic utopia, often suggesting a worship of machines. His futuristic imagery prefigured many Spielberg films. He exhibited in Breda and Antwerp (1956 and 1963), and since the 1970s his work has been included in numerous exhibitions on the Belgian avant-garde, including Modernisme. L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe (Ghent Fine Arts Museum, 2013). His works can be seen in this museum and in Antwerp, among others.

 

3 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Deux arbres et un escalier, 1929, oil on canvas
CRP179

Born in Brussels, he was the older brother of the artist Jean-Emile Van Gindertael, better known as Jean Milo. In 1915 he began his artistic education at the Brussels Academy with academic painter Herman Richir. He was influenced by Flemish Expressionists; choosing to focus on landscapes and figures. He was also an art critic; he was co-founder of the magazine Hélianthe and collaborated, among others, with La Nervie, the Franco-Belgian art and literature magazine. In 1942 he presented an exhibition in Marseille and in 1943 he moved to Paris, where he developed his own style and showed his admiration for the Fauve and Cubist painters. In 1928 he was included in the Young Belgian Painting group. In the 50s and 60s he focused on work as a critic, wrote numerous reviews–especially of the post-war abstract movement–and organised exhibitions. He published articles and books on creators such as Modigliani, Ensor, Oscar Gauthier, Nicolas de Staël and Hans Hartung.

 

4 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
L’’usine, 1930, oil on canvas
CRP180

 

5 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982) 

La Gloriette grise, 1930, oil on canvas

 

6 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Le rendez-vous, 1929, oil on canvas
CRP178

 

7 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
La fenêtre du marin, 1927, oil on canvas
CRP175

 

8 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Promenade forestière, c. 1927, oil on canvas
CRP174

 

9 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Le terrassier, 1927, oil on canvas
CRP176

 

10 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Les trois jongleurs, 1928, gouache on paper
CRP177

 

11 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’étoile de l’alliance, 1958, painted plaster
CRP165

Belgian painter, poet and art critic, born in Termonde (Belgium). Studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, he met Victor Servranckx, who taught him the principles of non-figurative art. At the age of 15 he joined the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts. His early revolutionary works include Constructivist assemblages and non-figurative paintings meticulously balanced in solemn and subtle harmonies of colour, prefiguring those of Mark Rothko. In 1925 he began to move away from non-figurative art and became Belgium’s first Surrealist painter, before Magritte. Exhibiting with Salvador Dalí, he also became friends with members of the Societé du Mystère, a Belgian Surrealist group. His paintings from this period are inspired by the spiritual qualities of the Pre-Raphaelites, the German Romantics and the Symbolists. In 1939 he exhibited in the Indépendants at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Since then, his works have been exhibited in many places, including the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. As a poet and writer he collaborated with the Surrealist magazine Distances, which was directed from Paris by Camille Goeman, who was the first to deal with Dalí’s work. Once at the heart of the ideological events of the Surrealist group, he decided to abandon it in order to develop his solo experiences, but remained friends with Goemans, Magritte and Mesens. His work can be found in public collections such as those of the Belgian Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp.

 

12 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’étoile de l’alliance (coquille bleu), 1958, painted plaster
CRP164

 

13 Emiel Poetou (Belgian, 1885-1975)
Portrait of the Dutch poet J. Louecteneurg, c. 1940, patinated plaster
CRP198

Belgian sculptor. Born in Ghent in 1885, he studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent under J. van Biesbrowck Jr. and in Brussels under Van der Stappen. In 1912 he received the Grand Prize from the Academy of Ghent. He did not seek beauty but expression, to show what moved him: social restlessness and religious serenity; a certain contained force can be observed in his work. He was one of the sculptors who wanted to free his art from its ancillary role; his goal was pure sculpture and his style was severe, even harsh. The war made him think deeply; he wanted to create an epic, a Gospel of Peace with Christ at its centre. With him, Flemish sculpture found new possibilities for the future. Together with Wijnants de Malinas and Jespers de Amberes, a third Flemish modernist came to claim a place in modern sculpture. Among his figures, stylised and cut into planes, those of Christ and the Virgin Mary kneeling are particularly of note, as well as his heads with three eyes, two noses and sometimes three mouths, the image of the Trinity; and his animals, such as the magnificent panther.

 

14 Karl Hofer (German, 1878-1955)
Agnuzzo (Ticino), c. 1940, oil on canvas
CRP197 

Born in Karlsruhe (Germany), he studied at the State Academy of Fine Arts and was influenced by Arnold Böcklin. From 1900 to 1903 he travelled to Paris and Rome. In 1904, he presented his first solo exhibition at the Kunsthaus Zurich. From 1908 to 1913 he lived in Paris; he was inspired by Cézanne and Hans von Marées, but opted for Expressionism outside the dominant groups, with his personal poetic vision and Classical touch. Most of his paintings were of figures, often repeating the same motifs in different and daring variations. During World War II he was arrested and held in a prison camp in France for three years. When the war was over, he moved to Switzerland, returning to Berlin in 1919, where he taught at the Institute of Pictorial Arts from 1920 to 1923, the year in which he became a member of the Prussian Academy of the Arts. In 1928 he presented a retrospective at the Kunsthalle in Mannheim, at the Berlin Secession and at the Alfred Flechtheim gallery in the same city. He was dismissed when the Nazis rose to power in 1933. More than 300 of his paintings were seized from private collections and some were put on show in the exhibition of Degenerate Art. In 1938 he received the Carnegie Prize from the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh. In 1945 he became the director of the Berlin School of Fine Arts, while continuing to paint, expressing his experiences in both World Wars, and the horror and madness of war. His work forms part of important private and public collections inside and outside the country. It can be found in the Winterthur Museum, the Bavarian National Museum in Munich, Museum Ludwig in Cologne, the Kunsthalle in Mannheim, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Städel and Deutsche Bundesbank in Frankfurt.

During a cleaning of the painting the painting a swastica appeared; it had been covered in an unkown time. The lorry on which it can be seen seems to be a Nazi transport and perhaps it alludes to arrests; we could say that the expressionism that dominates the colours of the houses and the sky reflects the horror of an terrified town. Agnuzzo is a small town in the Swiss canton Tessin or Ticino, during the II World War on the border of fascist Italy, in spite of which it welcomed numerosos refugees.

 

15 Prosper de Troyer (Belgian, 1880-1961)
Critics and advocates, 1925, oil on triplex
CRP170

Born in Destelbergen (Belgium). He studied at the Sint-Lucas Academy in Oostakker; he joined the socialist movement and in 1900 completed his military service in Mechelen and enrolled in evening classes at the Academy of Fine Arts, with Rik Wouters as his companion. His initial work is marked by post-Impressionism and Fauvism. In 1917 he joined the Doe Stil Voort circle of artists, which promoted dialogue between Flemish creators, and exhibited in the Aeolian Hall in Brussels. After the war he became interested in the avant-garde, especially Futurism, and began to exchange letters with Marinetti. His paintings from that period are characterised by large areas of colour, geometric forms and an intense sensation of speed and movement; his paintings incorporate the busy rhythm of the city. Since 1920 he evolved towards abstraction, with a softer palette. In 1920 and 1922 he took part in the Congresses for Modern Art. In 1922 he returned to figuration; choosing family, landscape and religious themes. He built bodies with geometric forms–cylinders, spheres and triangles–in a very particular expressionist style, with a hint of sarcasm. In the 1930s his art became more critical and gloomy. His work can be found in museums in Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, Mechelen and Ostend. The most notable include his Prosper De Troyer. Schilder in beweging (Prosper de Troyer. Painter in Motion) retrospective, organised in 2013 at the Lamot Cultural Centre in Mechelen.

Signed and dated bottom left: Pr. De Troyer 1925. Provenance: bought by Hippolyte Fierens-Gevaert (1870-1926) for 10.000 Belgian franc at the exhibition Prosper de Troyer, Cercle Royal Artistique, Littéraire et Scientifique d’Anvers, Antwerp, 1925. Fierens-Gevaert was the first chief curator of the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels; as the official delegate of Belgium for the Venice Biennials from 1907 and 1926, this latter year he selected Prosper de Troyer to represent his country. Sold at the auction Hippolyte Fierens-Gevaert, Galerie Georges Giroux, Brussels, 1951, lot n° 77 (Vitters en Raadgevers). Also exhibited at Le peintre De Troyer, Á la vierge poupine, Brussels, January 1926, n° 9. After Kurt de Boodt, an expert on De Troyer, this show was organised by the great Belgian vanguardist poet Paul Van Ostaijen. It has been exhibited at Prosper de Troyer Schilder in beweging, Stedelijke Musea, Malines, July 2013, n° 23.

The analyses of the picture correspond to its original Netherlandish title, Vitters en raadgevers (Critics and advisers). De Troyer used to mistrust art critics and dealers, because he thought they used to dictate how the artists should paint. Kurt de Boodt thinks that the figure of the right could be Paul Colin or Gustave van Hecke, critics; the woman in the background, perhaps the artist’s second wife, Germaine de Wilde; and the boy his second child, Hubert. The scena shows the artist surrounded by several advisers and, almost frightened, hearing their most subversive and fantastic theories. It wants above all to express his state of mind, emphasizing that the intelligent, inquiring, and hard-working artist is able to make a work without being advised by either friends or enemies, and by isolating himself from the crowd can he create personal works. The color enhances the strenght of this humorous fresco remarkably. 

 

16 Honoré Daumier (French, 1808-1879)
Conversations d’avocats or Deux avocats, década de 1860/860s, oil on panel
CRP007

Born in Marseilles. Caricaturist, painter and sculptor, particularly famous for his satirical drawings and engravings, in which he caricatures the political figures and society of his time. He studied with Alexandre Lenoir, a disciple of David. For 40 years he worked as a caricaturist in Paris, producing some 4,000 lithographs and as many drawings. In 1832 King Louis Philippe no longer tolerated his satires and sent him to prison for a time. In 1848 he began to paint in oils in a proto-Impressionist style that influenced his prints, depicting scenes of everyday life and customs featuring the same social criticism as his lithographs. In 1871 he was a member of the Paris Commune; in his later years he no longer worked, as he was almost blind.

The lawyers, judges and juries appear, even with a marked preference, among the many types that are the target for his scathing wit between the 50’ and the 70’ using both painting, watercolour, pencil or ink drawing, or lithography. This work (of which there is a pencil, pen and watercolour in a private collection in New York) belongs to the group of private colloquia, where they appear relaxed and often look to be busy in shady schemes, always to their own advantage and to the client’s disavantage; in a prowess of narrative talent, we can see the latter as the victim of an unfair system in the end of a story that we can deduct from the haughty and contemptuous air of the lawyer, often with vulture-like features. The artists emphasizes this uncanny appearance by using the shapeless patch of the black gown. The other modality shows the lawyers before the judges or leaving the court: scenes with a great dramatic effect because of their grandiloquent gestuality, after which a inflated and deceitful rhetoric can be perceived; some of them look like sketches for a bigger composition. Most of the scenes include two or three figures.

 

17 Karl Schmidt-Rottluff (German, 1884-1976)
Häuser durch den Strassenrand, 1931, oil on canvas
CRP035

A painter and engraver celebrated for his expressionist landscapes and engravings, he was born in Rottluff (Saxony, Germany) and began studying architecture in Dresden, where he met Kirchner and Heckel. In 1905 both moved to Dresden to study and paint; together they formed the expressionist group Die Brücke and presented their first exhibition in Leipzig. He added ‘Rottluff’ to his name, which was the name of his native town. In works such as Windy Day (1907) the transition from his early style can be seen, to the mature style of his works such as Self Portrait with Monocle (1910), characterised by daring dissonant colours. In 1911 he moved to Berlin; numerous works from this period reveal his new interest in Cubism. When the Nazis came to power he was forbidden from painting and expelled from the Prussian Academy of Arts; in 1937 many of his paintings were removed from museums and some were included in the exhibition Degenerate Art. In 1947 he was hired as a professor at the University of the Arts in Berlin. Germany paid tribute to him with numerous retrospectives and in 1956 he was awarded the Pour le Mérite medal, Prussia’s highest distinction. In 1964 he was the main promoter of the Brücke Museum in Berlin, inaugurated in 1967 with the works donated by him and other members of the group. His works can be seen at the MoMA, Los Angeles County Museum, the Muscarelle Museum of Art (Williamsburg), the Museum am Theaterplatz (Chemnitz), etc.

 

18 Sam Dillemans (Belgian, 1965)
Self-Portrait, 2004, oil on canvas
CRP283

Born in Louvain (Belgium). He lives and works in Antwerp. Passionate about literature and art, he began painting in 1979, at the age of 14, after discovering the work of Van Gogh. From 1984 to 1991 he studied at the Academy of Art in Louvain and at the Academy of Tourcoing in northern France. He then taught drawing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. An essential part of his work is research into painters of the past such as Rubens, Rembrandt or Turner, which he adapts to his own style of dark and expressive brushstrokes. His portraits of painters and writers and his series on boxers are notable. In 1994 he presented  Classic Beauty in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts (Antwerp), later participating in solo and group exhibitions in different museums and galleries. In 2016 he opened his own space, the Sam Dillemans Exhibition Hall in Antwerp, with a retrospective. In 2018 he presented Goodbye to all that. Paintings of the Great War, an exhibition of portraits of commanders, combat pilots, writers and poets who served in World War I.

 

19 Edmond Vandercammen (/Belgian, 1901-1981)
Portrait d’homme à la pipe, c. 1925, oil on canvas
CRP171

Painter and poet in French, born in Ohain (Belgium). He was educated at the Brussels Academy of Fine Arts and was an active participant in the Belgian avant-garde. He exhibited in Paris with Flouquet in 1920 and with Bracusi in 1927; in 1929 he participated in the Exhibition of Abstract Art. He collaborated with Magritte in the magazine 7 Arts. With Flouquet he founded the Journal des Poètes in 1930. He translated Spanish poets such as Lorca, Neruda and Lope; at the end of that decade he left painting for poetry. He was elected member of the Academy of French Language and Literature of Belgium and in 1977 was awarded the International Poetry Grand Prize. His paintings went unnoticed until the 1980s: in 1981 and 1987 retrospectives of his work were organised, followed by international exhibitions. His style is typical of the Belgian school of modern painting. First he was Cubist and colourist; then he moved towards Surrealism but preserved cubist elements and also showed reminiscences of traditional African art.

 

20 Maria Mela Muter (Polish, 1876-1967)
Portrait de R. Rey, c. 1917, oil on canvas
CRP067

Born in Warsaw to a rich family of Jewish merchants, she was Poland’s first Jewish professional painter. In 1892 she attended the drawing and painting school for women in Milosz Kotarbińsky. In 1901, married to the writer Michel Mutermilch, she left for Paris and continued her training at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière and the Académie Colarossi. In 1902 she began to exhibit her work at the Salon de Paris. She was a member of the Société Nationale de Beaux-Arts and the Société des Femmes Artistes, part of a group of exceptional women including Suzanne Valadon, Berthe Morisot and Marie Laurencin. She presented solo exhibitions in the galleries José Dalmau in Barcelona (1912), Chéron (1918) and Druet (1926 and 1928) in Paris, and in Poland at the Society for the Promotion of Fine Arts (1923). During the German occupation of France in World War II she hid in the south of the country. She is often associated with the Paris School, but her style, inspired by Whistler, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cézanne, Picasso and Severini, has a very personal touch and combines Post-Impressionism and Expressionism. A renowned elite portraitist, her models include Rodin, Diego Rivera, Erik Satie, Ravel and Rabindranath Tagore. In 1953 a retrospective of her work was presented in Paris.

 

ROOM 10

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 10 with sculptures by Marc Eemans in the foreground.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Roger Van Gindertael, Les trois jongleurs.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Karl Hofer, Agnuzzo (Ticino).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Prosper De Troyer, Critics and Advocates.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Sam Dillemans, Self-Portrait.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Honoré Daumier, Conversations d’avocats or Deux avocats.

ROOM 10

1 William Wauer (German, 1866-1962)
Masken, c. 1930, oil on canvas
CRP139

Born in Oberwiesenthal (Saxony, Germany). He studied at the Academy in Dresden and then in Berlin and Munich. After 1888 he lived in San Francisco, New York, Vienna, Rome, Leipzig… He was an editor, art critic, publisher and illustrator; he published the monthly magazine Quickborn. After 1900 he devoted himself to theatre. In 1912 he joined Der Sturm (in 1918 he exhibited his sculptures) and began working as a film director with films such as Richard Wagner (1913) and Der Tunnel (1914-1915). He was best known for Expressionist works such as the monumental bust of Herwarth Walden, a symbol of the formal radicalism of German modernism. In 1924 he founded the Internationale Vereinigung der Expressionisten, Kubisten, Futuristen und Konstruktivisten, banned in 1933. In 1941 the Nazis classified his art as “degenerate” and he was forbidden to practice; he would not exhibit his sculptures, paintings and engravings until after the war. He taught at the adult education centre in West Berlin and was a member of the board of directors of the Verband der Berliner Bildenden Künstler. In 2011 the William Wauer und der Berliner Kubismus exhibition was presented at the Georg Kolbe Museum (Berlin); in 2016, the Kunstmuseum Bern included him in Modern master: Degenerate art.

 

2 Edmond van Dooren (Belgian, 1896-1965)
Self-Portrait, 1917, oil on canvas
CRP061

A painter and graphic designer, he is born in Antwerp. In 1911 he entered the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, where he surprised with his daring use of colour. His first works, from 1914, are Impressionist landscapes en plein air. But he was more interested in form than content; in the Academy he befriended Jozef Peeters and in 1916-1919 they found a shared passion for depicting futuristic metropolises, in paintings prefiguring the images of the film Metropolis by Fritz Lang (1927). They also developed a kind of Symbolist and Romantic style related to their worship of Wagner’s music. Influenced by Robert Delaunay, Van Dooren’s work became increasingly abstract. In 1918 he founded with Peeters the Modern Art group, with the participation of Cockx, Léonard and Maes; they made contact with Der Sturm and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He used the linocut technique, which favours geometric abstraction. However, his art evolved towards visions of a futuristic utopia, often suggesting a worship of machines. His futuristic imagery prefigured many Spielberg films. He exhibited in Breda and Antwerp (1956 and 1963), and since the 1970s his work has been included in numerous exhibitions on the Belgian avant-garde, including Modernisme. L’art abstrait belge et l’Europe (Ghent Fine Arts Museum, 2013). His works can be seen in this museum and in Antwerp, among others.

 

3 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Deux arbres et un escalier, 1929, oil on canvas
CRP179

Born in Brussels, he was the older brother of the artist Jean-Emile Van Gindertael, better known as Jean Milo. In 1915 he began his artistic education at the Brussels Academy with academic painter Herman Richir. He was influenced by Flemish Expressionists; choosing to focus on landscapes and figures. He was also an art critic; he was co-founder of the magazine Hélianthe and collaborated, among others, with La Nervie, the Franco-Belgian art and literature magazine. In 1942 he presented an exhibition in Marseille and in 1943 he moved to Paris, where he developed his own style and showed his admiration for the Fauve and Cubist painters. In 1928 he was included in the Young Belgian Painting group. In the 50s and 60s he focused on work as a critic, wrote numerous reviews–especially of the post-war abstract movement–and organised exhibitions. He published articles and books on creators such as Modigliani, Ensor, Oscar Gauthier, Nicolas de Staël and Hans Hartung.

 

4 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
L’’usine, 1930, oil on canvas
CRP180

 

5 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982) 

La Gloriette grise, 1930, oil on canvas

 

6 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Le rendez-vous, 1929, oil on canvas
CRP178

 

7 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
La fenêtre du marin, 1927, oil on canvas
CRP175

 

8 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Promenade forestière, c. 1927, oil on canvas
CRP174

 

9 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Le terrassier, 1927, oil on canvas
CRP176

 

10 Roger van Gindertael (Belgian, 1899-1982)
Les trois jongleurs, 1928, gouache on paper
CRP177

 

11 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’étoile de l’alliance, 1958, painted plaster
CRP165

Belgian painter, poet and art critic, born in Termonde (Belgium). Studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, he met Victor Servranckx, who taught him the principles of non-figurative art. At the age of 15 he joined the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts. His early revolutionary works include Constructivist assemblages and non-figurative paintings meticulously balanced in solemn and subtle harmonies of colour, prefiguring those of Mark Rothko. In 1925 he began to move away from non-figurative art and became Belgium’s first Surrealist painter, before Magritte. Exhibiting with Salvador Dalí, he also became friends with members of the Societé du Mystère, a Belgian Surrealist group. His paintings from this period are inspired by the spiritual qualities of the Pre-Raphaelites, the German Romantics and the Symbolists. In 1939 he exhibited in the Indépendants at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Since then, his works have been exhibited in many places, including the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. As a poet and writer he collaborated with the Surrealist magazine Distances, which was directed from Paris by Camille Goeman, who was the first to deal with Dalí’s work. Once at the heart of the ideological events of the Surrealist group, he decided to abandon it in order to develop his solo experiences, but remained friends with Goemans, Magritte and Mesens. His work can be found in public collections such as those of the Belgian Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp.

 

12 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’étoile de l’alliance (coquille bleu), 1958, painted plaster
CRP164

 

13 Emiel Poetou (Belgian, 1885-1975)
Portrait of the Dutch poet J. Louecteneurg, c. 1940, patinated plaster
CRP198

Belgian sculptor. Born in Ghent in 1885, he studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent under J. van Biesbrowck Jr. and in Brussels under Van der Stappen. In 1912 he received the Grand Prize from the Academy of Ghent. He did not seek beauty but expression, to show what moved him: social restlessness and religious serenity; a certain contained force can be observed in his work. He was one of the sculptors who wanted to free his art from its ancillary role; his goal was pure sculpture and his style was severe, even harsh. The war made him think deeply; he wanted to create an epic, a Gospel of Peace with Christ at its centre. With him, Flemish sculpture found new possibilities for the future. Together with Wijnants de Malinas and Jespers de Amberes, a third Flemish modernist came to claim a place in modern sculpture. Among his figures, stylised and cut into planes, those of Christ and the Virgin Mary kneeling are particularly of note, as well as his heads with three eyes, two noses and sometimes three mouths, the image of the Trinity; and his animals, such as the magnificent panther.

 

14 Karl Hofer (German, 1878-1955)
Agnuzzo (Ticino), c. 1940, oil on canvas
CRP197 

Born in Karlsruhe (Germany), he studied at the State Academy of Fine Arts and was influenced by Arnold Böcklin. From 1900 to 1903 he travelled to Paris and Rome. In 1904, he presented his first solo exhibition at the Kunsthaus Zurich. From 1908 to 1913 he lived in Paris; he was inspired by Cézanne and Hans von Marées, but opted for Expressionism outside the dominant groups, with his personal poetic vision and Classical touch. Most of his paintings were of figures, often repeating the same motifs in different and daring variations. During World War II he was arrested and held in a prison camp in France for three years. When the war was over, he moved to Switzerland, returning to Berlin in 1919, where he taught at the Institute of Pictorial Arts from 1920 to 1923, the year in which he became a member of the Prussian Academy of the Arts. In 1928 he presented a retrospective at the Kunsthalle in Mannheim, at the Berlin Secession and at the Alfred Flechtheim gallery in the same city. He was dismissed when the Nazis rose to power in 1933. More than 300 of his paintings were seized from private collections and some were put on show in the exhibition of Degenerate Art. In 1938 he received the Carnegie Prize from the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh. In 1945 he became the director of the Berlin School of Fine Arts, while continuing to paint, expressing his experiences in both World Wars, and the horror and madness of war. His work forms part of important private and public collections inside and outside the country. It can be found in the Winterthur Museum, the Bavarian National Museum in Munich, Museum Ludwig in Cologne, the Kunsthalle in Mannheim, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Städel and Deutsche Bundesbank in Frankfurt.

During a cleaning of the painting the painting a swastica appeared; it had been covered in an unkown time. The lorry on which it can be seen seems to be a Nazi transport and perhaps it alludes to arrests; we could say that the expressionism that dominates the colours of the houses and the sky reflects the horror of an terrified town. Agnuzzo is a small town in the Swiss canton Tessin or Ticino, during the II World War on the border of fascist Italy, in spite of which it welcomed numerosos refugees.

 

15 Prosper de Troyer (Belgian, 1880-1961)
Critics and advocates, 1925, oil on triplex
CRP170

Born in Destelbergen (Belgium). He studied at the Sint-Lucas Academy in Oostakker; he joined the socialist movement and in 1900 completed his military service in Mechelen and enrolled in evening classes at the Academy of Fine Arts, with Rik Wouters as his companion. His initial work is marked by post-Impressionism and Fauvism. In 1917 he joined the Doe Stil Voort circle of artists, which promoted dialogue between Flemish creators, and exhibited in the Aeolian Hall in Brussels. After the war he became interested in the avant-garde, especially Futurism, and began to exchange letters with Marinetti. His paintings from that period are characterised by large areas of colour, geometric forms and an intense sensation of speed and movement; his paintings incorporate the busy rhythm of the city. Since 1920 he evolved towards abstraction, with a softer palette. In 1920 and 1922 he took part in the Congresses for Modern Art. In 1922 he returned to figuration; choosing family, landscape and religious themes. He built bodies with geometric forms–cylinders, spheres and triangles–in a very particular expressionist style, with a hint of sarcasm. In the 1930s his art became more critical and gloomy. His work can be found in museums in Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, Mechelen and Ostend. The most notable include his Prosper De Troyer. Schilder in beweging (Prosper de Troyer. Painter in Motion) retrospective, organised in 2013 at the Lamot Cultural Centre in Mechelen.

Signed and dated bottom left: Pr. De Troyer 1925. Provenance: bought by Hippolyte Fierens-Gevaert (1870-1926) for 10.000 Belgian franc at the exhibition Prosper de Troyer, Cercle Royal Artistique, Littéraire et Scientifique d’Anvers, Antwerp, 1925. Fierens-Gevaert was the first chief curator of the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels; as the official delegate of Belgium for the Venice Biennials from 1907 and 1926, this latter year he selected Prosper de Troyer to represent his country. Sold at the auction Hippolyte Fierens-Gevaert, Galerie Georges Giroux, Brussels, 1951, lot n° 77 (Vitters en Raadgevers). Also exhibited at Le peintre De Troyer, Á la vierge poupine, Brussels, January 1926, n° 9. After Kurt de Boodt, an expert on De Troyer, this show was organised by the great Belgian vanguardist poet Paul Van Ostaijen. It has been exhibited at Prosper de Troyer Schilder in beweging, Stedelijke Musea, Malines, July 2013, n° 23.

The analyses of the picture correspond to its original Netherlandish title, Vitters en raadgevers (Critics and advisers). De Troyer used to mistrust art critics and dealers, because he thought they used to dictate how the artists should paint. Kurt de Boodt thinks that the figure of the right could be Paul Colin or Gustave van Hecke, critics; the woman in the background, perhaps the artist’s second wife, Germaine de Wilde; and the boy his second child, Hubert. The scena shows the artist surrounded by several advisers and, almost frightened, hearing their most subversive and fantastic theories. It wants above all to express his state of mind, emphasizing that the intelligent, inquiring, and hard-working artist is able to make a work without being advised by either friends or enemies, and by isolating himself from the crowd can he create personal works. The color enhances the strenght of this humorous fresco remarkably. 

 

16 Honoré Daumier (French, 1808-1879)
Conversations d’avocats or Deux avocats, década de 1860/860s, oil on panel
CRP007

Born in Marseilles. Caricaturist, painter and sculptor, particularly famous for his satirical drawings and engravings, in which he caricatures the political figures and society of his time. He studied with Alexandre Lenoir, a disciple of David. For 40 years he worked as a caricaturist in Paris, producing some 4,000 lithographs and as many drawings. In 1832 King Louis Philippe no longer tolerated his satires and sent him to prison for a time. In 1848 he began to paint in oils in a proto-Impressionist style that influenced his prints, depicting scenes of everyday life and customs featuring the same social criticism as his lithographs. In 1871 he was a member of the Paris Commune; in his later years he no longer worked, as he was almost blind.

The lawyers, judges and juries appear, even with a marked preference, among the many types that are the target for his scathing wit between the 50’ and the 70’ using both painting, watercolour, pencil or ink drawing, or lithography. This work (of which there is a pencil, pen and watercolour in a private collection in New York) belongs to the group of private colloquia, where they appear relaxed and often look to be busy in shady schemes, always to their own advantage and to the client’s disavantage; in a prowess of narrative talent, we can see the latter as the victim of an unfair system in the end of a story that we can deduct from the haughty and contemptuous air of the lawyer, often with vulture-like features. The artists emphasizes this uncanny appearance by using the shapeless patch of the black gown. The other modality shows the lawyers before the judges or leaving the court: scenes with a great dramatic effect because of their grandiloquent gestuality, after which a inflated and deceitful rhetoric can be perceived; some of them look like sketches for a bigger composition. Most of the scenes include two or three figures.

 

17 Karl Schmidt-Rottluff (German, 1884-1976)
Häuser durch den Strassenrand, 1931, oil on canvas
CRP035

A painter and engraver celebrated for his expressionist landscapes and engravings, he was born in Rottluff (Saxony, Germany) and began studying architecture in Dresden, where he met Kirchner and Heckel. In 1905 both moved to Dresden to study and paint; together they formed the expressionist group Die Brücke and presented their first exhibition in Leipzig. He added ‘Rottluff’ to his name, which was the name of his native town. In works such as Windy Day (1907) the transition from his early style can be seen, to the mature style of his works such as Self Portrait with Monocle (1910), characterised by daring dissonant colours. In 1911 he moved to Berlin; numerous works from this period reveal his new interest in Cubism. When the Nazis came to power he was forbidden from painting and expelled from the Prussian Academy of Arts; in 1937 many of his paintings were removed from museums and some were included in the exhibition Degenerate Art. In 1947 he was hired as a professor at the University of the Arts in Berlin. Germany paid tribute to him with numerous retrospectives and in 1956 he was awarded the Pour le Mérite medal, Prussia’s highest distinction. In 1964 he was the main promoter of the Brücke Museum in Berlin, inaugurated in 1967 with the works donated by him and other members of the group. His works can be seen at the MoMA, Los Angeles County Museum, the Muscarelle Museum of Art (Williamsburg), the Museum am Theaterplatz (Chemnitz), etc.

 

18 Sam Dillemans (Belgian, 1965)
Self-Portrait, 2004, oil on canvas
CRP283

Born in Louvain (Belgium). He lives and works in Antwerp. Passionate about literature and art, he began painting in 1979, at the age of 14, after discovering the work of Van Gogh. From 1984 to 1991 he studied at the Academy of Art in Louvain and at the Academy of Tourcoing in northern France. He then taught drawing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp. An essential part of his work is research into painters of the past such as Rubens, Rembrandt or Turner, which he adapts to his own style of dark and expressive brushstrokes. His portraits of painters and writers and his series on boxers are notable. In 1994 he presented  Classic Beauty in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts (Antwerp), later participating in solo and group exhibitions in different museums and galleries. In 2016 he opened his own space, the Sam Dillemans Exhibition Hall in Antwerp, with a retrospective. In 2018 he presented Goodbye to all that. Paintings of the Great War, an exhibition of portraits of commanders, combat pilots, writers and poets who served in World War I.

 

19 Edmond Vandercammen (/Belgian, 1901-1981)
Portrait d’homme à la pipe, c. 1925, oil on canvas
CRP171

Painter and poet in French, born in Ohain (Belgium). He was educated at the Brussels Academy of Fine Arts and was an active participant in the Belgian avant-garde. He exhibited in Paris with Flouquet in 1920 and with Bracusi in 1927; in 1929 he participated in the Exhibition of Abstract Art. He collaborated with Magritte in the magazine 7 Arts. With Flouquet he founded the Journal des Poètes in 1930. He translated Spanish poets such as Lorca, Neruda and Lope; at the end of that decade he left painting for poetry. He was elected member of the Academy of French Language and Literature of Belgium and in 1977 was awarded the International Poetry Grand Prize. His paintings went unnoticed until the 1980s: in 1981 and 1987 retrospectives of his work were organised, followed by international exhibitions. His style is typical of the Belgian school of modern painting. First he was Cubist and colourist; then he moved towards Surrealism but preserved cubist elements and also showed reminiscences of traditional African art.

 

20 Maria Mela Muter (Polish, 1876-1967)
Portrait de R. Rey, c. 1917, oil on canvas
CRP067

Born in Warsaw to a rich family of Jewish merchants, she was Poland’s first Jewish professional painter. In 1892 she attended the drawing and painting school for women in Milosz Kotarbińsky. In 1901, married to the writer Michel Mutermilch, she left for Paris and continued her training at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière and the Académie Colarossi. In 1902 she began to exhibit her work at the Salon de Paris. She was a member of the Société Nationale de Beaux-Arts and the Société des Femmes Artistes, part of a group of exceptional women including Suzanne Valadon, Berthe Morisot and Marie Laurencin. She presented solo exhibitions in the galleries José Dalmau in Barcelona (1912), Chéron (1918) and Druet (1926 and 1928) in Paris, and in Poland at the Society for the Promotion of Fine Arts (1923). During the German occupation of France in World War II she hid in the south of the country. She is often associated with the Paris School, but her style, inspired by Whistler, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cézanne, Picasso and Severini, has a very personal touch and combines Post-Impressionism and Expressionism. A renowned elite portraitist, her models include Rodin, Diego Rivera, Erik Satie, Ravel and Rabindranath Tagore. In 1953 a retrospective of her work was presented in Paris.

 

ROOM 11

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 11, dedicated to surrealism, with works by Eemans, Ernst, Suro and others.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marc Eemans, Dame qui ôte ses parures.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Sadie Murdoch, I Can See the Men Hiding in the Forest.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Marc Eemans, L’envol de Jeanne.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Max Ernst, Sade-Sit.

ROOM 11

 

1 Sadie Murdoch (English, 1965)
Alexandre, Aragon, Breton, Buñuel, Caupenne, Dalí, Éluard, Ernst, Fourier, Goemans, Magritte, Nougé (versión 1), Nougé, Sadoul, Tanguy, Thirion, Valentin, 2015-16, watercolour on paper
I Can See the Man Hiding in the Forest, 2016, 17 unique archival pigment print on fine art paper
CRP305

Born in Hexham (Northumberland, England). She studied at Chelsea College of Art and Design (London) and at Leeds Metropolitan University. She was Abbey Rome Scholar at the British School in Rome in 2002 and participated in the Independent Studies Program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2003-2004. She is currently a lecturer at Goldsmith College in London. Her work deals with gender and pays special attention to the representation of women in modern art, exploring photographic archives that she decodes and reconstructs with her feminist gaze. She creates collages from photos by creators that have special meaning for her and looks for particular readings, often featuring chromatic anomalies and disarticulated fragments of the body. A review of her work was presented in SOURCE Photographic Review in 2011. In 2016 she presented her project SSS-MM, in Haus Konstruktiv (Zurich), which was accompanied by the artist’s book Omnipulsepunslide. In 2017 she featured in the exhibition of English artists Brexit-Out of the matrix? (Kunsthalle Palazzo Liestal, Basel).

 

2 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 16 – 1932, Debut de la peinture à l’huile, oil on canvas
CRP091

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

Signed and dated on the stretcher, upper right: SERVRANCKX 16 – 1932. Provenance: Angeline Servranckx-Turcksin, Elewijt, Belgium; Jos Gysbrechts, Kortenberg, Belgium.

 

3 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Le Rhythme souverain, 1928, oil on canvas
CRP158

Belgian painter, poet and art critic, born in Termonde (Belgium). Studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, he met Victor Servranckx, who taught him the principles of non-figurative art. At the age of 15 he joined the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts. His early revolutionary works include Constructivist assemblages and non-figurative paintings meticulously balanced in solemn and subtle harmonies of colour, prefiguring those of Mark Rothko. In 1925 he began to move away from non-figurative art and became Belgium’s first Surrealist painter, before Magritte. Exhibiting with Salvador Dalí, he also became friends with members of the Societé du Mystère, a Belgian Surrealist group. His paintings from this period are inspired by the spiritual qualities of the Pre-Raphaelites, the German Romantics and the Symbolists. In 1939 he exhibited in the Indépendants at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Since then, his works have been exhibited in many places, including the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. As a poet and writer he collaborated with the Surrealist magazine Distances, which was directed from Paris by Camille Goeman, who was the first to deal with Dalí’s work. Once at the heart of the ideological events of the Surrealist group, he decided to abandon it in order to develop his solo experiences, but remained friends with Goemans, Magritte and Mesens. His work can be found in public collections such as those of the Belgian Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp.

Signed upper left: Marc . Eemans. Provenance: private collection, Brussels.

 

4 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Dame qui ôte ses parures, 1927, oil on canvas 
CRP154

Signed upper left: Marc . Eemans. Provenance: private collection, Brussels.

 

5 Max Ernst  
Sade-Sit, c. 1923, oil on canvas 
CRP144

Painter, sculptor, one of the main defenders of irrationality in art and creator of the verismo faction of the Surrealist movement. Born in Brühl (Germany), in his youth he was interested in psychiatry and philosophy. After serving in the German army during World War I, he converted to Dada and formed a group in Cologne with Arp. His dada collages and photomontages combine a sense of mystery and a sense of humour. In 1922 he went to Paris and two years later he became one of the founding members of the surrealist group; in 1925 he began to use frottage and decalcomania techniques. He worked as an actor in Buñuel’s film La edad de oro (1930). After 1934 his activities increasingly focused on sculpture; he used improvised techniques. In 1936 he took part in the surrealist exhibition in London and in 1937 he held his first solo exhibition in London at the Mayor Gallery in Mayfair. When World War II broke out, he moved to the United States, where he met his third wife, collector and patron Peggy Guggenheim. When he returned to France in 1949, his work became less experimental; and his late paintings show no reference to the “quiet violence” of his wartime production. His most notable works include Max Ernst: Dada and the dawn of surrealism (MoMA 1993) and the Metropolitan and Albertina retrospectives in Vienna (2013). His work can be found at museums in Brussels, Chicago, San Francisco, the Guggenheim (New York), the Metropolitan, the MoMA, Boijmans (Rotterdam), the Reina Sofía and Thyssen (Madrid), Tel Aviv; national galleries in Scotland and Washington, the Tate and the Peggy Guggenheim collection (Venice).

It was in the collection of Walter Schwarzenberg, owner of the gallery Le Centaure, and in that of Gilbert Sarraute-Mourchette, both in Brussels.

 

6 Darío Suro (Dominican, 1917-1997)
Self-portrait, 1942, oil on canvas
CRP199

Painter, art critic and diplomat, born in La Vega (Dominican Republic); his family is dedicated to politics and culture; he began his art education with his uncle, painter and sculptor Enrique García Godoy. After an impressionist phase, between 1946 and 1948 he lived in Mexico and studied with muralists Diego Rivera, Agustín Lazo and Jesús Guerrero Galván; his work reflected social and racial concerns and he used bold colours. When he returned he held a solo exhibition in the Gallery of Fine Arts of Santo Domingo. He combined creation with diplomacy; from 1950 to 1963 he was cultural attaché of the Dominican Embassy in Madrid, as before in Mexico, and then cultural advisor in Washington. In 1954 he obtained the Medal of the Eloy Alfaro International Foundation of Panama. His work, which started with primitive cultures, goes through different stages (Expressionism, Abstraction, etc.). Considered as a renovator of Dominican plastic art together with Jaime Colson and Yoryi Morel, he presented exhibitions in his country and in England, France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Colombia and the USA (Rose Eried and Poindexter galleries in New York). He participated in biennials (Venice, Pittsburgh). In 1993 he was awarded the First National Plastic Arts Prize of the Dominican Republic. In 2001 the retrospective Darío Suro: metamorphosis and transmigrations was held at the Cultural Centre of Spain in Santo Domingo.

 

7 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Mirage sur la mer, 1930, oil on canvas
CRP162

 

8 Marc Eemans (belga/Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’envol de Jeanne, 1929, oil on canvas
CRP161

Signed and dated upper left: Marc. Eemans/’29. Idem plus title verso, upper right: Marc. Eemans/29/Jehaantje’s le melvaant. Dedicated, signed and dated on the stretcher, upper left: Pour ma grande amie Margareta von Bartha, ce souvenir de ma jeunese déjà bien lointaine 25.VIII.87 Marc. Eemans. Provenance: the artist’s collectio until 1987; Margareta von Bartha, Basel; Georges Mathysen-Gerst, New York; private collection, Brussels.

 

9 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’éloge de l’air, 1928, oil on canvas
CRP157

Signed and dated upper left: Marc . Eemans. Title on the stretcher, upper left: L’éloge de l’air. Provenance: Carl Laszlo, Basel; George E. Mathysen-Gerst, Geneve.

 

10 Huib Hoste (Belgian, 1881-1957)
Desk, 1931-32, chromed steel with teak and linoleum top
CRP192

An architect and urban planner, he was born in Bruges and studied in Ghent. At the end of the war he played an important role in the reconstruction of destroyed Flemish villages. From 1918 to 1920 he published in the magazine De Stijl; in 1920 he organised the first Congress for Modern Art in Antwerp alongside Josef Peeters. In the 1920s he designed several garden towns in Belgium. In 1928 he became a founding member of the CIAMs (International Congresses of Modern Architecture) and the following year he joined the Cercle et Carré group in Paris. His works include the Maison Gombert (Woluwe Saint-Pierre, Brussels region) and the Maison De Beir, also known as Maison Noir (Knokke).

 

11 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Portrait de homme imaginaire, c. 1927, oil on plywood
CRP117

Born in Paris, in 1910 his family moved to Brussels, where he studied with Constant Montald and Gisbert Combaz at the Academy of Fine Arts. He connected with the avant-garde of Antwerp, Berlin, Brussels, Lausanne and Paris; sharing a studio with Magritte in Brussels. In modernist circles he was known for his abstractions and biomorphic and geometric works. In 1921 he took part in the International Exhibition of Modern Art in Geneva and, with Magritte, in the Centre d’Art in Brussels. He was co-founder of the avant-garde group 7 Arts; he was responsible for the painting section of its magazine and its illustrator. Alongside Eisenstein, Ernst, Gropius, Schlemmer, Servranckx and others he was a regular guest at Baroness Hélène de Mandrot’s Maison des Artistes, at her Château de La Sarraz, near Lausanne, where the First International Congress of Modern Architecture, the First Congress of Independent Cinema in 1929 and many other early 20th century revolutionary artistic manifestations were held. Hélène de Mandrot, like Katherine Dreier and Gertrude Stein, is one of the mainstays of modern art. In 1925, Flouquet founded the L’Assaut group with Gailliard and organised exhibitions under his aegis. As a leader of La Plastique Pure, he regularly exhibited abroad: Buenos Aires, Chicago, Leipzig, Madrid, Monza, New York, Paris, Philadelphia and Zurich; alone, in 1925 at the Der Sturm gallery and in 1927 at the Deutsche Werkbund in Stuttgart, founded by Henry van de Velde, who invited him. He designed many covers for the revolutionary art magazine Der Sturm. His work can be found in museums such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, the Museum of Ghent and the avant-garde Museum of Grenoble; it has been exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden, the Museum of Ghent and the Tate Modern in London, among others.

 

12 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Portrait d’homme imaginaire, c. 1927, India ink on paper 
CRP119

 

13 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Portrait d’homme imaginaire, c. 1927, oil on plywood
CRP118 

 

 

ROOM 11

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 11, dedicated to surrealism, with works by Eemans, Ernst, Suro and others.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Marc Eemans, Dame qui ôte ses parures.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Sadie Murdoch, I Can See the Men Hiding in the Forest.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marc Eemans, L_envol de Jeanne.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Max Ernst, Sade-Sit.

ROOM 11

1 Sadie Murdoch (English, 1965)
Alexandre, Aragon, Breton, Buñuel, Caupenne, Dalí, Éluard, Ernst, Fourier, Goemans, Magritte, Nougé (versión 1), Nougé, Sadoul, Tanguy, Thirion, Valentin, 2015-16, watercolour on paper
I Can See the Man Hiding in the Forest, 2016, 17 unique archival pigment print on fine art paper
CRP305

Born in Hexham (Northumberland, England). She studied at Chelsea College of Art and Design (London) and at Leeds Metropolitan University. She was Abbey Rome Scholar at the British School in Rome in 2002 and participated in the Independent Studies Program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2003-2004. She is currently a lecturer at Goldsmith College in London. Her work deals with gender and pays special attention to the representation of women in modern art, exploring photographic archives that she decodes and reconstructs with her feminist gaze. She creates collages from photos by creators that have special meaning for her and looks for particular readings, often featuring chromatic anomalies and disarticulated fragments of the body. A review of her work was presented in SOURCE Photographic Review in 2011. In 2016 she presented her project SSS-MM, in Haus Konstruktiv (Zurich), which was accompanied by the artist’s book Omnipulsepunslide. In 2017 she featured in the exhibition of English artists Brexit-Out of the matrix? (Kunsthalle Palazzo Liestal, Basel).

 

2 Victor Servranckx (Belgian, 1897-1965)
Opus 16 – 1932, Debut de la peinture à l’huile, oil on canvas
CRP091

One of the protagonists of the Belgian avant-garde, he was born in Diegem (Belgium) and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he graduated in 1917 with the highest distinction and met Maes, Flouquet, Baugniet and Magritte. Between 1917 and 1919 he developed Symbolism. From 1917 he took part in various group exhibitions; in 1918, together with Magritte, he developed applied arts as a designer for Peters-Lacroix’s wallpaper factory, an experience that led him from Fauvism to geometric abstraction. In 1920 he joined the La Plastique Pure movement. In 1922 he co-founded the magazine 7 Arts and with Magritte wrote the manifesto L’art pur. Défense de l’estéthique, influenced by Le Corbusier, Ozenfant and Reverdy’s cubist theories. Inspired by Baumeister and purists, he abandoned figuration for abstraction; he geometrically evoked the world of machine and technology. In 1918 he exhibited his work for the first time at l’Effort Moderne, a meeting place for Cubists since World War II; there he met Marinetti, Van Doesburg, Léger and Duchamp. In 1926, thanks to Duchamp, he participated in the exhibitions of the Katherine Dreyer Corporation in America and was invited by Moholy-Nagy to teach at the New Bauhaus in Chicago, an offer he refused. He received a gold medal at the International Exhibition of Decorative and Industrial Arts in Paris (1925). In 1926 he created the first “surrealist” and “organic” abstractions, before Ernst. In 1928 he exhibited at Der Sturm. He represented Belgium at the 1948 and 1954 Venice Biennials. The Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels organised a major retrospective; his works can be seen in the MoMA, the Berardo collection in Lisbon, the Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, the Museum of Fine Arts of Ghent, National d’Art Moderne of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris or the Museum of Fine Arts of Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been exhibited in museums such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

Signed and dated on the stretcher, upper right: SERVRANCKX 16 – 1932. Provenance: Angeline Servranckx-Turcksin, Elewijt, Belgium; Jos Gysbrechts, Kortenberg, Belgium.

 

3 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Le Rhythme souverain, 1928, oil on canvas
CRP158

Belgian painter, poet and art critic, born in Termonde (Belgium). Studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, he met Victor Servranckx, who taught him the principles of non-figurative art. At the age of 15 he joined the Belgian avant-garde group 7 Arts. His early revolutionary works include Constructivist assemblages and non-figurative paintings meticulously balanced in solemn and subtle harmonies of colour, prefiguring those of Mark Rothko. In 1925 he began to move away from non-figurative art and became Belgium’s first Surrealist painter, before Magritte. Exhibiting with Salvador Dalí, he also became friends with members of the Societé du Mystère, a Belgian Surrealist group. His paintings from this period are inspired by the spiritual qualities of the Pre-Raphaelites, the German Romantics and the Symbolists. In 1939 he exhibited in the Indépendants at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Since then, his works have been exhibited in many places, including the Ghent Museum of Fine Arts and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. As a poet and writer he collaborated with the Surrealist magazine Distances, which was directed from Paris by Camille Goeman, who was the first to deal with Dalí’s work. Once at the heart of the ideological events of the Surrealist group, he decided to abandon it in order to develop his solo experiences, but remained friends with Goemans, Magritte and Mesens. His work can be found in public collections such as those of the Belgian Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp.

Signed upper left: Marc . Eemans. Provenance: private collection, Brussels.

 

4 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Dame qui ôte ses parures, 1927, oil on canvas 
CRP154

Signed upper left: Marc . Eemans. Provenance: private collection, Brussels.

 

5 Max Ernst  
Sade-Sit, c. 1923, oil on canvas 
CRP144

Painter, sculptor, one of the main defenders of irrationality in art and creator of the verismo faction of the Surrealist movement. Born in Brühl (Germany), in his youth he was interested in psychiatry and philosophy. After serving in the German army during World War I, he converted to Dada and formed a group in Cologne with Arp. His dada collages and photomontages combine a sense of mystery and a sense of humour. In 1922 he went to Paris and two years later he became one of the founding members of the surrealist group; in 1925 he began to use frottage and decalcomania techniques. He worked as an actor in Buñuel’s film La edad de oro (1930). After 1934 his activities increasingly focused on sculpture; he used improvised techniques. In 1936 he took part in the surrealist exhibition in London and in 1937 he held his first solo exhibition in London at the Mayor Gallery in Mayfair. When World War II broke out, he moved to the United States, where he met his third wife, collector and patron Peggy Guggenheim. When he returned to France in 1949, his work became less experimental; and his late paintings show no reference to the “quiet violence” of his wartime production. His most notable works include Max Ernst: Dada and the dawn of surrealism (MoMA 1993) and the Metropolitan and Albertina retrospectives in Vienna (2013). His work can be found at museums in Brussels, Chicago, San Francisco, the Guggenheim (New York), the Metropolitan, the MoMA, Boijmans (Rotterdam), the Reina Sofía and Thyssen (Madrid), Tel Aviv; national galleries in Scotland and Washington, the Tate and the Peggy Guggenheim collection (Venice).

It was in the collection of Walter Schwarzenberg, owner of the gallery Le Centaure, and in that of Gilbert Sarraute-Mourchette, both in Brussels.

 

6 Darío Suro (Dominican, 1917-1997)
Self-portrait, 1942, oil on canvas
CRP199

Painter, art critic and diplomat, born in La Vega (Dominican Republic); his family is dedicated to politics and culture; he began his art education with his uncle, painter and sculptor Enrique García Godoy. After an impressionist phase, between 1946 and 1948 he lived in Mexico and studied with muralists Diego Rivera, Agustín Lazo and Jesús Guerrero Galván; his work reflected social and racial concerns and he used bold colours. When he returned he held a solo exhibition in the Gallery of Fine Arts of Santo Domingo. He combined creation with diplomacy; from 1950 to 1963 he was cultural attaché of the Dominican Embassy in Madrid, as before in Mexico, and then cultural advisor in Washington. In 1954 he obtained the Medal of the Eloy Alfaro International Foundation of Panama. His work, which started with primitive cultures, goes through different stages (Expressionism, Abstraction, etc.). Considered as a renovator of Dominican plastic art together with Jaime Colson and Yoryi Morel, he presented exhibitions in his country and in England, France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Colombia and the USA (Rose Eried and Poindexter galleries in New York). He participated in biennials (Venice, Pittsburgh). In 1993 he was awarded the First National Plastic Arts Prize of the Dominican Republic. In 2001 the retrospective Darío Suro: metamorphosis and transmigrations was held at the Cultural Centre of Spain in Santo Domingo.

 

7 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
Mirage sur la mer, 1930, oil on canvas
CRP162

 

8 Marc Eemans (belga/Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’envol de Jeanne, 1929, oil on canvas
CRP161

Signed and dated upper left: Marc. Eemans/’29. Idem plus title verso, upper right: Marc. Eemans/29/Jehaantje’s le melvaant. Dedicated, signed and dated on the stretcher, upper left: Pour ma grande amie Margareta von Bartha, ce souvenir de ma jeunese déjà bien lointaine 25.VIII.87 Marc. Eemans. Provenance: the artist’s collectio until 1987; Margareta von Bartha, Basel; Georges Mathysen-Gerst, New York; private collection, Brussels.

 

9 Marc Eemans (Belgian, 1907-1998)
L’éloge de l’air, 1928, oil on canvas
CRP157

Signed and dated upper left: Marc . Eemans. Title on the stretcher, upper left: L’éloge de l’air. Provenance: Carl Laszlo, Basel; George E. Mathysen-Gerst, Geneve.

 

10 Huib Hoste (Belgian, 1881-1957)
Desk, 1931-32, chromed steel with teak and linoleum top
CRP192

An architect and urban planner, he was born in Bruges and studied in Ghent. At the end of the war he played an important role in the reconstruction of destroyed Flemish villages. From 1918 to 1920 he published in the magazine De Stijl; in 1920 he organised the first Congress for Modern Art in Antwerp alongside Josef Peeters. In the 1920s he designed several garden towns in Belgium. In 1928 he became a founding member of the CIAMs (International Congresses of Modern Architecture) and the following year he joined the Cercle et Carré group in Paris. His works include the Maison Gombert (Woluwe Saint-Pierre, Brussels region) and the Maison De Beir, also known as Maison Noir (Knokke).

 

11 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Portrait de homme imaginaire, c. 1927, oil on plywood
CRP117

Born in Paris, in 1910 his family moved to Brussels, where he studied with Constant Montald and Gisbert Combaz at the Academy of Fine Arts. He connected with the avant-garde of Antwerp, Berlin, Brussels, Lausanne and Paris; sharing a studio with Magritte in Brussels. In modernist circles he was known for his abstractions and biomorphic and geometric works. In 1921 he took part in the International Exhibition of Modern Art in Geneva and, with Magritte, in the Centre d’Art in Brussels. He was co-founder of the avant-garde group 7 Arts; he was responsible for the painting section of its magazine and its illustrator. Alongside Eisenstein, Ernst, Gropius, Schlemmer, Servranckx and others he was a regular guest at Baroness Hélène de Mandrot’s Maison des Artistes, at her Château de La Sarraz, near Lausanne, where the First International Congress of Modern Architecture, the First Congress of Independent Cinema in 1929 and many other early 20th century revolutionary artistic manifestations were held. Hélène de Mandrot, like Katherine Dreier and Gertrude Stein, is one of the mainstays of modern art. In 1925, Flouquet founded the L’Assaut group with Gailliard and organised exhibitions under his aegis. As a leader of La Plastique Pure, he regularly exhibited abroad: Buenos Aires, Chicago, Leipzig, Madrid, Monza, New York, Paris, Philadelphia and Zurich; alone, in 1925 at the Der Sturm gallery and in 1927 at the Deutsche Werkbund in Stuttgart, founded by Henry van de Velde, who invited him. He designed many covers for the revolutionary art magazine Der Sturm. His work can be found in museums such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, the Museum of Ghent and the avant-garde Museum of Grenoble; it has been exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden, the Museum of Ghent and the Tate Modern in London, among others.

 

12 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Portrait d’homme imaginaire, c. 1927, India ink on paper 
CRP119

 

13 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Portrait d’homme imaginaire, c. 1927, oil on plywood
CRP118 

 

 

ROOM 12

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 12 with works by Marc Maet.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Jan Vanriet, The Music Boy.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Lois Lane, Big Fan.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Marc Maet, Little Guernica or Friday Fish Day.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Peter Van Gheluwe, Flag Shadow.

ROOM 12

 

1 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
The Music Boy (Green), The Music Boy (Grey), The Music Boy (Orange), The Music Boy (Black) (quadriptych), 2013, oil on canvas
CRP267

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1971 he became the youngest member of the editorial board of political magazine De Nieuwe Maand. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels and Paris (1082) and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

2 Lois Lane (American, 1948)
Big Fan, 2014, oil on linen
CRP332

Born in Liège (Belgium). He studied drawing at the Academy of Fine Arts in his native city; he graduated in typography and worked as a specialist in technical drawing after World War I. In 1920, he joined the Groupe Moderne d’Art, promoted by Belgian writer and essayist Georges Linze, as was the magazine Anthologie, to spread the new avant-garde trends. He made illustrations and engravings for books, but in the end he would follow the path of abstraction. In 1922 he befriended Czech painter and graphic artist Frantisek Kupka. In 1923 he settled in Lille and joined avant-garde intellectuals such as painter Felix del Marle and writers Émile Donce-Brisy and Charles Rochat, with whom he collaborated in the literature and art magazine Vouloir. Between 1945 and 1958 he lived in Paris; he took part in exhibitions at the Salon des Réalités Nouvelles with his characteristic geometric compositions of circles, spirals and stars. In 1976, his vision was affected following a cataract operation but he continued to paint until the end of his life, using coloured pencils on cardboard. In 1985 a retrospective was held at the Museum of Modern Art in Villeneuve d’Ascq (Lille). His work is conserved at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium.

 

3 Marc Maet (Belgian, 1955-2000)
Journal d’un peintre II, 1995, acrilic on canvas
CRP261

Born in Schoten (Flanders, Belgium). He lived and worked in Ghent. His work has been divided into three periods: at the beginning of the 80s he came close to the Expressionism of Neue Wilde; at the end of that decade he followed dominant international trends and in the 90s he evolved to take on a vigorous literary style rooted in Belgian artistic heritage. Along with Philippe Vandenberg, Fik van Gestel and others he is considered to be an outstanding representative of New Painting in Belgium. From 1991-2000 he was on the borderline between the figurative and the non-figurative. In the Magritte tradition, he gave an important role to words; his paintings often feature words and images of a symbolic nature.

 

4 Marc Maet  
L’un doit toujours soutenir l’autre, 2000, acrylic on canvas
CRP263

 

5 Marc Maet (belga/Belgian, 1955-2000)
Little Guernica or Friday Fish Day, 1999, acrilic on canvas 
CRP262

 

6 Peter Van Gheluwe (Belgian, 1957)
Flag Shadow (polyptych of 11), 2013, acrylic on canvas
CRP299

Born in Ghent (Belgium), he studied at the Sint-Lucas Higher Institute of Fine Arts, where he has been teaching since 1982. In 1978 he presented his first solo exhibition at the Siegfried Gallery (Buck) and won the Hoppeland Painting Prize (Poperinge). In 1980 and 1986 he was awarded distinctions at the Jeune Peinture Belge competition and took part in collective exhibitions at the Brussels Fine Arts Centre. In 1982 he was awarded the Ebes Graphic Arts Prize (Ghent). His work is characterised by the exploration of space and attention to the behaviour of light, a constant theme since initial series such as Ardens ritme (1978) and Staken in landschap (1979-1983) and which evolved with time. As of 2003 he focused on his family history: his father passed away after spending years in a forced-labour camp in Germany during World War II. His in-depth research lead to the series of drawings Zie tekening, the art book Hidden view (2008) and a solo exhibition at the Gallery Negenpuntnegen (Roeselare). In 2013 he presented in Antwerp the series Noorderlicht, Black+White and Stil-Licht in the Schoots-Van Duyse Gallery, and Identity in the Woot, Ruimte voor Kunst. In 2015 he took part in the collective Summer exhibition at the Roberto Polo Gallery (Brussels), where in the same year he presented his solo exhibition Private view and in 2016 Gnomon. Some of his works are held by the Belgian State, the Ostend Museum, the Belgian National Bank and the city of Aalst.

 

7 Peter Van Gheluwe (Belgian, 1957)
Swimming Pool (hexaptych), 2008-09, acrylic on canvas
CRP298

ROOM 12

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 12 with works by Marc Maet.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Jan Vanriet, The Music Boy.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Lois Lane, Big Fan.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marc Maet, Little Guernica or Friday Fish Day.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Peter Van Gheluwe, Flag Shadow.

ROOM 12

1 Jan Vanriet (Belgian, 1948)
The Music Boy (Green), The Music Boy (Grey), The Music Boy (Orange), The Music Boy (Black) (quadriptych), 2013, oil on canvas
CRP267

Born in Antwerp (Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy and combined painting with poetry. In 1968 he took part in a writers’ protest against literary censorship in Belgium. In 1971 he became the youngest member of the editorial board of political magazine De Nieuwe Maand. In 1972 he exhibited for the first time at the Zwarte Panter gallery and later began his collaboration with gallery owner Jan Lens (Lens Fine Arts). His books, published by Manteau, his literary collaborations and cover designs for literary magazine Revolver, alternate with his exhibitions: biennials in Sao Paulo, Venice and Seoul; the Isy Brachot gallery in Brussels and Paris (1082) and others. When Antwerp was the European Capital of Culture (1993), he organised an important exhibition and painted the ceiling of the lobby of the restored Bourla Theatre. The Lippisches Landesmuseum (Detmold) presented Transport (1994-2004), paintings partly inspired by World War II: his parents and other members of his family collaborated in the Resistance against the Nazi invaders, but they were arrested and deported to Mauthausen and Ravensbrück. In 2005 he travelled to Israel to install his triptych Nathan the Wise. In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp invited him to “close” the museum before its remodelling and organised the retrospective Closing time in dialogue with classical artists such as Rubens, Van Eyck, Titian, Cranach and others; in 2012 the Roberto Polo gallery in Brussels inaugurated Closed doors, his first exhibition there. In 2013 he presented Losing Face, a series on Jewish deportees from Belgium to Auschwitz, shown at the Kazerne Museum in Mechelen and then at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. His work can be found in the National Museum of Gdansk, the British Museum, the Museum of Polish Jewish History (Warsaw), the Walsall New Art Gallery and others.

 

2 Lois Lane (American, 1948)
Big Fan, 2014, oil on linen
CRP332

Born in Liège (Belgium). He studied drawing at the Academy of Fine Arts in his native city; he graduated in typography and worked as a specialist in technical drawing after World War I. In 1920, he joined the Groupe Moderne d’Art, promoted by Belgian writer and essayist Georges Linze, as was the magazine Anthologie, to spread the new avant-garde trends. He made illustrations and engravings for books, but in the end he would follow the path of abstraction. In 1922 he befriended Czech painter and graphic artist Frantisek Kupka. In 1923 he settled in Lille and joined avant-garde intellectuals such as painter Felix del Marle and writers Émile Donce-Brisy and Charles Rochat, with whom he collaborated in the literature and art magazine Vouloir. Between 1945 and 1958 he lived in Paris; he took part in exhibitions at the Salon des Réalités Nouvelles with his characteristic geometric compositions of circles, spirals and stars. In 1976, his vision was affected following a cataract operation but he continued to paint until the end of his life, using coloured pencils on cardboard. In 1985 a retrospective was held at the Museum of Modern Art in Villeneuve d’Ascq (Lille). His work is conserved at the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium.

 

3 Marc Maet (Belgian, 1955-2000)
Journal d’un peintre II, 1995, acrilic on canvas
CRP261

Born in Schoten (Flanders, Belgium). He lived and worked in Ghent. His work has been divided into three periods: at the beginning of the 80s he came close to the Expressionism of Neue Wilde; at the end of that decade he followed dominant international trends and in the 90s he evolved to take on a vigorous literary style rooted in Belgian artistic heritage. Along with Philippe Vandenberg, Fik van Gestel and others he is considered to be an outstanding representative of New Painting in Belgium. From 1991-2000 he was on the borderline between the figurative and the non-figurative. In the Magritte tradition, he gave an important role to words; his paintings often feature words and images of a symbolic nature.

 

4 Marc Maet  
L’un doit toujours soutenir l’autre, 2000, acrylic on canvas
CRP263

 

5 Marc Maet (belga/Belgian, 1955-2000)
Little Guernica or Friday Fish Day, 1999, acrilic on canvas 
CRP262

 

6 Peter Van Gheluwe (Belgian, 1957)
Flag Shadow (polyptych of 11), 2013, acrylic on canvas
CRP299

Born in Ghent (Belgium), he studied at the Sint-Lucas Higher Institute of Fine Arts, where he has been teaching since 1982. In 1978 he presented his first solo exhibition at the Siegfried Gallery (Buck) and won the Hoppeland Painting Prize (Poperinge). In 1980 and 1986 he was awarded distinctions at the Jeune Peinture Belge competition and took part in collective exhibitions at the Brussels Fine Arts Centre. In 1982 he was awarded the Ebes Graphic Arts Prize (Ghent). His work is characterised by the exploration of space and attention to the behaviour of light, a constant theme since initial series such as Ardens ritme (1978) and Staken in landschap (1979-1983) and which evolved with time. As of 2003 he focused on his family history: his father passed away after spending years in a forced-labour camp in Germany during World War II. His in-depth research lead to the series of drawings Zie tekening, the art book Hidden view (2008) and a solo exhibition at the Gallery Negenpuntnegen (Roeselare). In 2013 he presented in Antwerp the series Noorderlicht, Black+White and Stil-Licht in the Schoots-Van Duyse Gallery, and Identity in the Woot, Ruimte voor Kunst. In 2015 he took part in the collective Summer exhibition at the Roberto Polo Gallery (Brussels), where in the same year he presented his solo exhibition Private view and in 2016 Gnomon. Some of his works are held by the Belgian State, the Ostend Museum, the Belgian National Bank and the city of Aalst.

 

7 Peter Van Gheluwe (Belgian, 1957)
Swimming Pool (hexaptych), 2008-09, acrylic on canvas
CRP298

ROOMS 13 and 14

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 14, with works by Bannard and Maes (left).

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Jo Delahaut, Parcours.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Howard Mehring, Rythming II.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Lászlo Moholy-Nagy, Construction.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Walter Darby Bannard, Alby’s Burgundy.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Thomas Downing, Quilt.

ROOM 13

 

1 Lászlo Moholy-Nagy (Hungarian, 1895-1946)
Construction, 1923, stainless steel, Plexiglas and painted Vulcanfiber
CRP146

A painter, photographer and art teacher, born in Bacsbarsod (Hungary). His vision of a non-figurative art composed of purely visual principles (colour, texture, light and balance of forms) exerted an enormous influence on fine and applied arts in the first half of the 20th century. He studied law in Budapest; he published Cubist-inspired woodcuts in the avant-garde magazine Ma. He moved to Berlin in 1921; from 1923 to 1929 he headed the metal workshop of the Bauhaus, the famous avant-garde school of design. As a painter and photographer he worked primarily with light; his “stills” are composed directly on film, and his “light modulators”, oil paints on transparent or polished surfaces, include moving light effects. In 1935, fleeing Nazi Germany, he moved to London; in 1937 he went to Chicago, where he organised and directed the New Bauhaus. His work can be found at the Guggenheim (New York), MoMA, the Metropolitan, the Tate Gallery, the National Gallery of Scotland, Chicago, Boston and San Francisco museums, and the Norton Simon Collection, among others.

Plexiglas replaced glass as soon as it was commercially available, after 1936.

 

2 Thomas Downing (American, 1928-1985)
Quilt, 1963, acrilic on canvas
CRP222

Born in Suffolk, Virginia (USA). In 1948 he received a Bachelor of Arts from Randolph-Macon College in Virginia and then studied at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn until 1950. He briefly attended Académie Julian in Paris. After serving in the military, he moved to Washington; in 1954 he enrolled at Catholic University, where he met Kenneth Noland, a member of the Washington Color School. He shared a studio with another representative of the movement, Howard Mehring, and in 1959 both of them along with Betty Pajac founded the Origo Gallery (Washington). In 1964, the critic Clement Greenberg included him in the famous exhibition Post-Painterly Abstraction. In 1965 his paintings were presented in the exhibition The Washington Color Painters, curated by Gerald Nordland. He was known as the “pioneer of the dot”: his compositions feature circles of different tones and sizes, seeming to float in an undefined space. Until 1975 he combined creation with teaching; in 1979 and 1980 he held exhibitions at the Osuna Gallery (Washington), and in the year of his death, another at the Phillips Collection. His work can be found in the Smithsonian Institution, the Phillips and Norton Simon collections, and the North Carolina Museum.

 

3 Thomas Downing (American, 1928-1985)
Phased Red, 1968, acrilic on canvas
CRP223

 

4 Erich Röhle (German, 1903-1991)
Marinec. 1925, watercolour on paper
CRP168  

Abstract painter born in Glauchau (Saxony).

 

5 Xavier Noiret-Thomé (French, 1971)
Coins Painting X, 2014, acrylic, coins and collage on canvas
CRP307

Born in Charleville-Mezières (France). He lives and works in Brussels. He studied at the Regional School of Fine Arts in Rennes and since 1995 as an artist-in-residence at the Domaine in Kerguéhennec contemporary art centre and at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam. His work moves between the figurative and the abstract and is characterised by diversity, the mixing of influences and research into genres and styles. In 2001 he was awarded the Belgian Young Painting Prize and in 2005 he began a residency in Villa Medici, after winning an award at the French Academy in Rome. In 2011 he designed the stained glass windows for the church of Saint Thomas in Vaulx-en-Velin (France). His most recent solo exhibitions include La parade des cannibales (Les filles du Calvaire gallery, Paris, 2009); Bloated faces & Pop-up (AD, Athens, 2013); Cosmogony (Museum van Deinze en Leiestreek, Deinze, 2015) and The quiet struggle (Roberto Polo Gallery, Brussels). He participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, in the Vanderborght of Brussels(2016) and the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta (2017).

 

ROOM 14

 

6 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Alby’s Burgundy, 1959, oil on canvas
CRP206

Born in New Haven, Connecticut (USA). After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he studied philosophy at Princeton University. He struck up a friendship with artist Frank Stella, who, like him, was interested in Minimalist Abstraction. In 1964 he was included in the historic Post-painterly abstraction exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and in 1965 in Responsive eye at the MoMA. That same year he held one of his first solo exhibitions at the Tibor gallery in Nagy (New York). In 1968 he received a Guggenheim scholarship. Associated with the Color Field, his style evolved from the simplicity typical of his early years, a single band painted around a colour field, to somewhat more complex geometric shapes. As a critic and commentator, he wrote for publications such as Art in America and Art International. In 1989 he became head of the Art Department at the University of Miami. In the later stage of his life, interest in his work was revived. The Berry Campbell Gallery in New York held exhibitions that reviewed and vindicated his career. In the year of his death, his work was presented in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta. His work can be found at the MoMA, Brooklyn Museum, American Art Museum in Whitney, Solomon R. Guggenheim, Centre Pompidou in Paris and Victoria National Gallery (Australia).

 

7 Jo Delahaut (Belgian, 1911-1992)
Parcours, 1954, oil on canvas
CRP213

Born in Vottem (Belgium). An outstanding figure of Belgian geometric abstraction, he studied at the Liège Academy and received his doctorate in Art History in 1939. In 1940 he began to paint Expressionist figures, but, influenced by Auguste Herbin, he evolved towards abstraction and created static geometries where colour played an essential role. His work later became simpler and moved towards a minimalism that sought to stimulate the intellect. As he explained: “Signs, colours, rhythms and their infinite combinations are means that mysteriously touch the unexplained springs of consciousness”. In 1942, he joined the Young Belgian Painting group, and in 1946, he was a member of the Salon de Réalités Nouvelles in Paris. In 1952 he founded the Belgian group Art Abstrait together with Pol Bury, Jean Milo, Georges Collignon, Albert Saverys and others. He later promoted the creation of Abstract Art-Shapes (1956) and Art Built (1960). In 1980 a retrospective of his work was presented at the Museum of Art in Wallonia (Liège). He exhibited at the Wilhelm Hack Museum in Ludwigshafen (Germany) in 1981 and at the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Belgium (Brussels) in 1982. In 1985 he participated in the Sao Paulo Biennial; other exhibitions were organised at the Montreal Museum of Contemporary Art, the Leopold Hoesch in Düren (Germany) and the Provincial Museum for Modern Art in Ostend (1989). In 1990 his last major exhibition was held at the Museum of Art in Wallonia (Liège).

 

8 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Tuscan Air, 1972, acrylic and alkyd resin on canvas
CRP210

 

9 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Carrot Mountain, 1973, acrylic and alkyd resin on canvas
CRP211

 

10 Howard Mehring (American, 1931-1978)
Equa, 1961, acrilic on canvas
CRP220

Born in Washington (USA). He studied art at Wilson Teachers College with Leon Berkowitz. In 1955 he obtained a Master of Fine Arts at the Catholic University of America, where he met Kenneth Noland. Both are part of the Washington Color School, an abstract movement that explored vast fields of colour, along with Morris Louis, Paul Reed and Gene Davis. His work was distinguished by the use of geometric shapes in his innovative compositions of intense and vivid tonalities. He exhibited for the first time in 1959 at the Origo Gallery (Washington), of which he was a founding member. In the 1960s he also showed his work at the Jefferson Place and the Adams-Morgan. In 1964 several of his works were included in the exhibition Post-painterly abstraction, curated by the critic Clement Greenberg at the County Art Museum in Los Angeles. In 1965 he participated in The Washington Color Painters, at the Modern Art Gallery in Washington. In 1968 he stopped painting and focused on drawing. In 1977 a retrospective was held at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, along with an exhibition of his drawings at the Phillips Collection, both in Washington. His work can be found at the Whitney Museum, the MoMA, the National Gallery of Art (Washington) and the Tate Gallery in London.

 

11 Walter Dexel (German, 1890-1973)
Komposition Serie XXVII Nr. 4, 1968, oil on canvas
CRP227

Born in Munich (Germany). He studied Art History under Heinrich Wölfflin and Fritz Burger in his home town and took private drawing lessons with the landscape painter H. Gröber; in 1916 he completed his doctorate at the University of Jena. A painter, typographer, and designer, he was an outstanding figure in 1920s Constructivism. Cézanne inspired him in his early days; he would later move towards Cubism and Expressionism. In 1914 he presented his first solo exhibition at the Dietzel Gallery (Munich). He then directed the exhibitions of the Jena Art Association (Campendonk, Moholy-Nagy and other Bauhaus members), and met Van Doesburg. Already immersed in abstract-constructive imagery, he held several solo exhibitions in the Berlin gallery of Herwarth Walden. In 1926 he moved to Frankfurt, where he designed neon signs, advertisements for clocks, and even telephone booths. He worked as a professor of graphic design at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Magdeburg until he was dismissed by the Nazis in 1935; two of his works were included in the exhibition Degenerate Art . From 1936 to 1942 he taught at the National School of Art in Berlin-Schöneberg. The Stadtmuseum Braunschweig dedicated a retrospective to him in 1962; his work can be found in the MoMA, the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art (Washington), the LACMA and the Harvard Art Museum, among others.

 

12 Howard Mehring (American, 1931-1978)
Rhytming II, 1966, acrilic on canvas
CRP221

 

13 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
11.7.59 #7, 1959, spray acrylic on paper
CRP207

 

14 Jo Delahaut (Belgian, 1911-1992)
Méditation N° 16, 1961, oil on wood
CRP214

 

15 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Ivory Parlour II, 1964, alkyd resina on sized cotton duck canvas
CRP208

 

16 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974) 
Untitled, década de 1950/1950s, oil on wood panel
CRP136

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

 

17 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Station 1, 2012, acrylic and gouache on cradled wood panel
CRP354

Artist, writer and independent exhibition organiser, he was born, lives and works in the New York area. He studied International Relations and Diplomacy, but chose to pursue a career in creation and earned two Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degrees: at Ramapo College (New Jersey) and Hunter College (City University of New York). He was known for his minimalist planning of abstraction and for using monochrome and contrasting colours; as a writer, he has been publishing in Brooklyn Railway since 2012. Currently a visiting professor at the Parson School for Design, he has also been an assistant professor at Castleton State College (Vermont) and a visiting professor at the Mason Gross School of Fine Arts, Rutgers University (New Jersey). His work is represented in many national and international collections, including the MoMA, the Whitney Museum, the Metropolitan and the Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Decorative Arts and Design (Smithsonian Institution).

 

18 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Large Survey (Mana), 2015, acrylic on cradled wood panel
CRP355 

 

19 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Large Blue Survey, 2018, acrylic on cradled wood panel
CRP356

 

20 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Three Roses, 2018, acrylic on cradled wood panel
CRP357

 

ROOMS 13 and 14

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 14, with works by Bannard and Maes (left).

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Jo Delahaut, Parcours.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Howard Mehring, Rythming II.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Construction.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Walter Darby Bannard, Alby’s Burgundy.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Thomas Downing, Quilt.

ROOM 13

1 Lászlo Moholy-Nagy (Hungarian, 1895-1946)
Construction, 1923, stainless steel, Plexiglas and painted Vulcanfiber
CRP146

A painter, photographer and art teacher, born in Bacsbarsod (Hungary). His vision of a non-figurative art composed of purely visual principles (colour, texture, light and balance of forms) exerted an enormous influence on fine and applied arts in the first half of the 20th century. He studied law in Budapest; he published Cubist-inspired woodcuts in the avant-garde magazine Ma. He moved to Berlin in 1921; from 1923 to 1929 he headed the metal workshop of the Bauhaus, the famous avant-garde school of design. As a painter and photographer he worked primarily with light; his “stills” are composed directly on film, and his “light modulators”, oil paints on transparent or polished surfaces, include moving light effects. In 1935, fleeing Nazi Germany, he moved to London; in 1937 he went to Chicago, where he organised and directed the New Bauhaus. His work can be found at the Guggenheim (New York), MoMA, the Metropolitan, the Tate Gallery, the National Gallery of Scotland, Chicago, Boston and San Francisco museums, and the Norton Simon Collection, among others.

Plexiglas replaced glass as soon as it was commercially available, after 1936.

 

2 Thomas Downing (American, 1928-1985)
Quilt, 1963, acrilic on canvas
CRP222

Born in Suffolk, Virginia (USA). In 1948 he received a Bachelor of Arts from Randolph-Macon College in Virginia and then studied at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn until 1950. He briefly attended Académie Julian in Paris. After serving in the military, he moved to Washington; in 1954 he enrolled at Catholic University, where he met Kenneth Noland, a member of the Washington Color School. He shared a studio with another representative of the movement, Howard Mehring, and in 1959 both of them along with Betty Pajac founded the Origo Gallery (Washington). In 1964, the critic Clement Greenberg included him in the famous exhibition Post-Painterly Abstraction. In 1965 his paintings were presented in the exhibition The Washington Color Painters, curated by Gerald Nordland. He was known as the “pioneer of the dot”: his compositions feature circles of different tones and sizes, seeming to float in an undefined space. Until 1975 he combined creation with teaching; in 1979 and 1980 he held exhibitions at the Osuna Gallery (Washington), and in the year of his death, another at the Phillips Collection. His work can be found in the Smithsonian Institution, the Phillips and Norton Simon collections, and the North Carolina Museum.

 

3 Thomas Downing (American, 1928-1985)
Phased Red, 1968, acrilic on canvas
CRP223

 

4 Erich Röhle (German, 1903-1991)
Marinec. 1925, watercolour on paper
CRP168  

Abstract painter born in Glauchau (Saxony).

 

5 Xavier Noiret-Thomé (French, 1971)
Coins Painting X, 2014, acrylic, coins and collage on canvas
CRP307

Born in Charleville-Mezières (France). He lives and works in Brussels. He studied at the Regional School of Fine Arts in Rennes and since 1995 as an artist-in-residence at the Domaine in Kerguéhennec contemporary art centre and at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam. His work moves between the figurative and the abstract and is characterised by diversity, the mixing of influences and research into genres and styles. In 2001 he was awarded the Belgian Young Painting Prize and in 2005 he began a residency in Villa Medici, after winning an award at the French Academy in Rome. In 2011 he designed the stained glass windows for the church of Saint Thomas in Vaulx-en-Velin (France). His most recent solo exhibitions include La parade des cannibales (Les filles du Calvaire gallery, Paris, 2009); Bloated faces & Pop-up (AD, Athens, 2013); Cosmogony (Museum van Deinze en Leiestreek, Deinze, 2015) and The quiet struggle (Roberto Polo Gallery, Brussels). He participated in Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, in the Vanderborght of Brussels(2016) and the Episcopal Palace of Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta (2017).

 

ROOM 14

6 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Alby’s Burgundy, 1959, oil on canvas
CRP206

Born in New Haven, Connecticut (USA). After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he studied philosophy at Princeton University. He struck up a friendship with artist Frank Stella, who, like him, was interested in Minimalist Abstraction. In 1964 he was included in the historic Post-painterly abstraction exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and in 1965 in Responsive eye at the MoMA. That same year he held one of his first solo exhibitions at the Tibor gallery in Nagy (New York). In 1968 he received a Guggenheim scholarship. Associated with the Color Field, his style evolved from the simplicity typical of his early years, a single band painted around a colour field, to somewhat more complex geometric shapes. As a critic and commentator, he wrote for publications such as Art in America and Art International. In 1989 he became head of the Art Department at the University of Miami. In the later stage of his life, interest in his work was revived. The Berry Campbell Gallery in New York held exhibitions that reviewed and vindicated his career. In the year of his death, his work was presented in the exhibition Painting after postmodernism. Belgium-USA, curated by Barbara Rose, at the Vanderborght in Brussels, the Episcopal Palace in Malaga and the Reggia di Caserta. His work can be found at the MoMA, Brooklyn Museum, American Art Museum in Whitney, Solomon R. Guggenheim, Centre Pompidou in Paris and Victoria National Gallery (Australia).

 

7 Jo Delahaut (Belgian, 1911-1992)
Parcours, 1954, oil on canvas
CRP213

Born in Vottem (Belgium). An outstanding figure of Belgian geometric abstraction, he studied at the Liège Academy and received his doctorate in Art History in 1939. In 1940 he began to paint Expressionist figures, but, influenced by Auguste Herbin, he evolved towards abstraction and created static geometries where colour played an essential role. His work later became simpler and moved towards a minimalism that sought to stimulate the intellect. As he explained: “Signs, colours, rhythms and their infinite combinations are means that mysteriously touch the unexplained springs of consciousness”. In 1942, he joined the Young Belgian Painting group, and in 1946, he was a member of the Salon de Réalités Nouvelles in Paris. In 1952 he founded the Belgian group Art Abstrait together with Pol Bury, Jean Milo, Georges Collignon, Albert Saverys and others. He later promoted the creation of Abstract Art-Shapes (1956) and Art Built (1960). In 1980 a retrospective of his work was presented at the Museum of Art in Wallonia (Liège). He exhibited at the Wilhelm Hack Museum in Ludwigshafen (Germany) in 1981 and at the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Belgium (Brussels) in 1982. In 1985 he participated in the Sao Paulo Biennial; other exhibitions were organised at the Montreal Museum of Contemporary Art, the Leopold Hoesch in Düren (Germany) and the Provincial Museum for Modern Art in Ostend (1989). In 1990 his last major exhibition was held at the Museum of Art in Wallonia (Liège).

 

8 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Tuscan Air, 1972, acrylic and alkyd resin on canvas
CRP210

 

9 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Carrot Mountain, 1973, acrylic and alkyd resin on canvas
CRP211

 

10 Howard Mehring (American, 1931-1978)
Equa, 1961, acrilic on canvas
CRP220

Born in Washington (USA). He studied art at Wilson Teachers College with Leon Berkowitz. In 1955 he obtained a Master of Fine Arts at the Catholic University of America, where he met Kenneth Noland. Both are part of the Washington Color School, an abstract movement that explored vast fields of colour, along with Morris Louis, Paul Reed and Gene Davis. His work was distinguished by the use of geometric shapes in his innovative compositions of intense and vivid tonalities. He exhibited for the first time in 1959 at the Origo Gallery (Washington), of which he was a founding member. In the 1960s he also showed his work at the Jefferson Place and the Adams-Morgan. In 1964 several of his works were included in the exhibition Post-painterly abstraction, curated by the critic Clement Greenberg at the County Art Museum in Los Angeles. In 1965 he participated in The Washington Color Painters, at the Modern Art Gallery in Washington. In 1968 he stopped painting and focused on drawing. In 1977 a retrospective was held at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, along with an exhibition of his drawings at the Phillips Collection, both in Washington. His work can be found at the Whitney Museum, the MoMA, the National Gallery of Art (Washington) and the Tate Gallery in London.

 

11 Walter Dexel (German, 1890-1973)
Komposition Serie XXVII Nr. 4, 1968, oil on canvas
CRP227

Born in Munich (Germany). He studied Art History under Heinrich Wölfflin and Fritz Burger in his home town and took private drawing lessons with the landscape painter H. Gröber; in 1916 he completed his doctorate at the University of Jena. A painter, typographer, and designer, he was an outstanding figure in 1920s Constructivism. Cézanne inspired him in his early days; he would later move towards Cubism and Expressionism. In 1914 he presented his first solo exhibition at the Dietzel Gallery (Munich). He then directed the exhibitions of the Jena Art Association (Campendonk, Moholy-Nagy and other Bauhaus members), and met Van Doesburg. Already immersed in abstract-constructive imagery, he held several solo exhibitions in the Berlin gallery of Herwarth Walden. In 1926 he moved to Frankfurt, where he designed neon signs, advertisements for clocks, and even telephone booths. He worked as a professor of graphic design at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Magdeburg until he was dismissed by the Nazis in 1935; two of his works were included in the exhibition Degenerate Art . From 1936 to 1942 he taught at the National School of Art in Berlin-Schöneberg. The Stadtmuseum Braunschweig dedicated a retrospective to him in 1962; his work can be found in the MoMA, the Metropolitan, the National Gallery of Art (Washington), the LACMA and the Harvard Art Museum, among others.

 

12 Howard Mehring (American, 1931-1978)
Rhytming II, 1966, acrilic on canvas
CRP221

 

13 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
11.7.59 #7, 1959, spray acrylic on paper
CRP207

 

14 Jo Delahaut (Belgian, 1911-1992)
Méditation N° 16, 1961, oil on wood
CRP214

 

15 Walter Darby Bannard (American, 1934-2016)
Ivory Parlour II, 1964, alkyd resina on sized cotton duck canvas
CRP208

 

16 Karel Maes (Belgian, 1900-1974) 
Untitled, década de 1950/1950s, oil on wood panel
CRP136

Born in Mol (Belgium), painter and designer of applied arts, he belongs to the first generation of Belgian abstract artists. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Brussels, where he met Flouquet, Magritte and Servranckx. Once the war was over, he experimented with Neo-Impressionism, Futurism and Post-Cubism; he soon rejected figuration in favour of geometric and biomorphic art. In 1920 he joined the avant-garde group Art Centre in Antwerp; that year he took part in the Exposition Internationale d’Art Moderne in Geneva with Cockx, Magritte and Peeters, in 1923 in Les arts belges d’esprit nouveau, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, and in 1925 in the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Arts in Monza. In 1922 he signed (as the only Belgian) the De Stijl manifesto. He was co-founder of the revolutionary group 7 Arts. In 1927, an article in the eponymous magazine described his work as la plastique pure, a categorically concrete art, an extreme evolution of Cubism. At that time he was teaching at the Bauhaus. Retrospectives have been dedicated to him: Antwerp 1992, Brussels 2007. He has work in the Archives of Modern Architecture in Brussels, the MoMA in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, Antwerp and Ghent, and in the Lakenhal Museum in Leiden, the Tate Modern in London and many others.

 

17 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Station 1, 2012, acrylic and gouache on cradled wood panel
CRP354

Artist, writer and independent exhibition organiser, he was born, lives and works in the New York area. He studied International Relations and Diplomacy, but chose to pursue a career in creation and earned two Bachelor’s of Fine Arts degrees: at Ramapo College (New Jersey) and Hunter College (City University of New York). He was known for his minimalist planning of abstraction and for using monochrome and contrasting colours; as a writer, he has been publishing in Brooklyn Railway since 2012. Currently a visiting professor at the Parson School for Design, he has also been an assistant professor at Castleton State College (Vermont) and a visiting professor at the Mason Gross School of Fine Arts, Rutgers University (New Jersey). His work is represented in many national and international collections, including the MoMA, the Whitney Museum, the Metropolitan and the Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Decorative Arts and Design (Smithsonian Institution).

 

18 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Large Survey (Mana), 2015, acrylic on cradled wood panel
CRP355 

 

19 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Large Blue Survey, 2018, acrylic on cradled wood panel
CRP356

 

20 Tom McGlynn (American, 1958)
Three Roses, 2018, acrylic on cradled wood panel
CRP357

ROOM 15

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 15, with works by Marc Maet in the foreground.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Jaroslaw Kozlowski, Facts – Lines and Surfaces (polyptych).

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Jaroslaw Kozlowski, Facts – Lines and Surfaces (polyptych). (2)

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marc Maet, The Mouth of the Sky.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Karen Gunderson, Moonlite Sea.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Jozef Peeters, cabinet Alles voor Vlaanderen, Vlaanderen voor Kristus.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Carlo Mollino, chair.

 

ROOM 15

 

1 Jaroslaw Kozlowsky (Polish, 1945)
Facts – Lines and Surfaces, 1978 – 1979, polyptych 1 to 6, graphite on paper 
CRP238

Born in Śrem (Poland). He studied painting at the current Academy of Fine Arts at Poznań, where he became a teacher in 1967 and its director from 1981 to 1987. He also teaches at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. In 1972 he became involved in the management of Galeria Akumulatory 2 (Poznan), a platform for avant-garde artists from Poland and other countries that he ran until 1990. From 1991 to 1993 he was the curator of the gallery and collection of the Centre for Contemporary Art at Ujazdowski Castle in Warsaw. Part of the Conceptual movement, he created installations in which light, sound, drawing, photography and diverse objects are all essential. In 1970 he became interested in word games and created works of a linguistic nature. In 1980 he focused on the deconstruction of myths related to art (concepts of freedom, originality, value, etc.). In his opinion, art is a field of critical analysis from which to dismantle deep-rooted mental patterns and conventionalisms. He also creates performance art and has written several art books. Since 1967 he has exhibited in museums and galleries inside and outside his country and participated in biennials in places such as Paris (1977); Sydney (1990), Istanbul (1995) and Sao Paulo (2006). One of his most notable exhibitions was Continuum XXVIII, held in 2010 at the Profile Foundation in Warsaw.

 

2 Carlo Mollino (Italian, 1905-1973)
Chair, late 1950s to early 1960s, executed by Apelli & Varesio, Turin, in solid oak, mounted with brass fittings and spacers; seat with original upholstery in synthetic velvet
CRP218

Born in Turin. An architect, designer and photographer; his architecture and furniture are famous for their ability to allow occupants to manipulate volumes as they please. He began his career as an architect in 1930; in the 1930s, in collaboration with Vittorio Baudi di Selve, he designed the building of the Società Ippica Torinese, considered his masterpiece but destroyed in 1960; he broke with the past and the fascist regime and was inspired by Aalto and Mendelsohn. In the 1960s and 70s he designed numerous interiors for private houses and various buildings, especially in Turin, having started working as an interior designer and furniture designer in the 1940s.

 

3 J. S. Ford, Johnson and Company
Armchair, c. 1905, stained oak
CRP028

The Ford & Johnson Company was founded by John Sherlock Ford and Henry W. Johnson in Columbus (Ohio) in 1867 as a chair and armchair manufacturing company. In 1868 the company moved its factory to Michigan City (Indiana); in 1872, to Chicago, changing its name to J. S Ford, Johnson & Company. It made high-quality furniture, especially mission-style chairs, armchairs and sofas, the solid furniture that was supposed to equip the Spanish missions in the United States; it was sold all over the country. The company went bankrupt in 1913 and was sold.

 

4 Gustave Serrurier-Bovy (Belgian, 1858-1910)
Silex armchair, 1905, poplar tree wood, painted screws and washers
CRP027

Architect and furniture designer born in Liège. Hanka, Horta, Van de Velde and he were the creators of the modernist style. He visited London in 1884 and, fascinated by Morris’ work, struck up an interest in the Arts & Crafts movement. Returning to Belgium, he designed his villa, L’Aube (Liège), and produced works for the Brussels International Exposition in 1897. He made simple, linear and elegant furniture; he was particularly fond of mahogany and, like Van de Velde, he had a predilection for metalwork (iron, brass, bronze and copper). He presented his works at the International Expositions in London, Paris and Saint Louis. His most famous creations include the Pavillon Bleu restaurant for the Paris exhibition of 1900 and “Silex” furniture: tables, chairs, bedrooms. He resorted more than his English colleagues to asymmetry and was the inventor of “combined furniture”, which joined several pieces into one.

Made by Serrurier-Bovy Cie. (Liège).

 

5 Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870-1956)
Armchair, 1905, executed by the Wiener Werkstätte in painted pine 
CRP024 

Born in Plenitz (Moravia), he was an architect whose work was important in the early development of modern architecture in Europe. He studied under Otto Wagner in Vienna, and was a founding member of the Viennese Secession in 1899, which embraced the Art Nouveau style more than Wagner. In 1899 he started teaching at the Vienna School of Applied Arts, and in 1903 participated in the creation of Wiener Werkstätte, which he directed for 30 years. His initial period is marked by the design of the Sanatorium Purkersdorf. His masterpiece is the Stoclet House in Brussels, with its monumental yet elegant exterior. He designed the Austrian pavilions for the Deutscher Werkbund exhibition in Cologne (1914) and the 1934 Venice Biennale. In 1920 he was appointed municipal architect of Vienna and in 1924 and 1925 he produced various house projects for the city.

 

6 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Cabinet Alles voor Vlaanderen, Vlaanderen voor Kristus, c. 1922, painted birch and plywood 
CRP042

A painter, graphic artist and designer born in Antwerp. With Donas, Eemans, Flouquet, Léonard, Maes, Servranckx and Vantongerloo he forms the group of the first abstract artists of Belgium. In 1913 he entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, although he was most interested in personal experimentation. In 1914 he painted “Luminist” landscapes and portraits. In 1915-1917, inspired by Theosophy, he moved towards Symbolism. In 1918 he met Marinetti and joined the Futurist movement. With Van Dooren and Cockx he founded the Modern Art group in Antwerp, which established international contacts, for example with the Der Sturm gallery, Berlin’s avant-garde centre, and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He showed his first abstract painting in 1920. He took part in international exhibitions such as those in Geneva in 1921 and Budapest in 1924. He collaborated with avant-garde magazines such as Het Overzicht, which he co-founded in 1921, as well as De Driehoekin 1925, which supported constructivism. His work is in the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Ghent and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His work has been exhibited in museums around the world, such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

7 Marc Maet (Belgian, 1955-2000)
The Mouth of the Sky, 1988, acrylic, lacquer, leather and felt on canvas
CRP257

Born in Schoten (Flanders, Belgium). He lived and worked in Ghent. His work has been divided into three periods: at the beginning of the 80s he came close to the Expressionism of Neue Wilde; at the end of that decade he followed dominant international trends and in the 90s he evolved to take on a vigorous literary style rooted in Belgian artistic heritage. Along with Philippe Vandenberg, Fik van Gestel and others he is considered to be an outstanding representative of New Painting in Belgium. From 1991-2000 he was on the borderline between the figurative and the non-figurative. In the Magritte tradition, he gave an important role to words; his paintings often feature words and images of a symbolic nature.

 

8 Marc Maet (Belgian, 1955-2000)
Passion – Passion, 1990, acrylic and polyester on canvas
CRP258

 

9 Karen Gunderson (American, 1943)
Rounding the Cape, 2004, oil on canvas
CRP296

Born in Racine (Wisconsin). In 1965 she earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Wisconsin State University, Whitewater, and in 1968 a Master’s degree in painting from Iowa University. Her first works were plexiglass constructions using images of clouds. In 1971, she had a major solo exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. In 1972 she came into contact with the artist Sol Lewitt, who became a great source of inspiration for her. In 1973 she moved to New York and taught at the Tisch Art School, as she had done before at Cornell College in Iowa and Ohio State University, and would do later at Mount Saint Vincent College in Riverdale (New York). In 1988 she began creating illuminated black paintings, which she exhibited in 1990 at the Cherry Stone Gallery in Wellfleet (Massachusetts). In 2001 she took part in the Florence Biennale and won the Lorenzo il Magnifico painting prize. In 2004, she exhibited her black paintings at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid. In 2006 she was the subject of a documentary, Karen Gunderson: the black paintings, directed by Lisa Ades. The continuous transformation of light and the importance of the viewer’s position are basic elements of her work. Her subjects include the sea, mountains, the moon, flowers, and constellations. She is also interested in historical episodes, as can be seen in series such as Kings, where she deals with the rescue of the Jews during World War II. Her work can be found in the museums of San Francisco and Cleveland.

 

10 Karen Gunderson (American, 1943)
Moonlite Sea, 2004, oil on canvas
CRP295

 

11 Jaroslaw Kozlowski (Polish, 1945)
Drawing Fact IV, 1979, graphite on paper
CRP239

 

12 Jaroslaw Kozlowski (Polish, 1945)
Empathy of the Truth to the Life and Vice Versa, 2010, 2 tables, 4 chairs, 2 plants (1 artificial, 1 real)
CRP240

ROOM 15

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 15, with works by Marc Maet in the foreground.

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Jaroslaw Kozlowski, Facts – Lines and Surfaces (polyptych).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Jaroslaw Kozlowski, Facts – Lines and Surfaces (polyptych). (2)

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Marc Maet, The Mouth of the Sky.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Walter Darby Bannard, Alby_s Burgundy.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Jozef Peeters, cabinet Alles voor Vlaanderen, Vlaanderen voor Kristus.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Carlo Mollino, chair.

ROOM 15

1 Jaroslaw Kozlowsky (Polish, 1945)
Facts – Lines and Surfaces, 1978 – 1979, polyptych 1 to 6, graphite on paper 
CRP238

Born in Śrem (Poland). He studied painting at the current Academy of Fine Arts at Poznań, where he became a teacher in 1967 and its director from 1981 to 1987. He also teaches at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. In 1972 he became involved in the management of Galeria Akumulatory 2 (Poznan), a platform for avant-garde artists from Poland and other countries that he ran until 1990. From 1991 to 1993 he was the curator of the gallery and collection of the Centre for Contemporary Art at Ujazdowski Castle in Warsaw. Part of the Conceptual movement, he created installations in which light, sound, drawing, photography and diverse objects are all essential. In 1970 he became interested in word games and created works of a linguistic nature. In 1980 he focused on the deconstruction of myths related to art (concepts of freedom, originality, value, etc.). In his opinion, art is a field of critical analysis from which to dismantle deep-rooted mental patterns and conventionalisms. He also creates performance art and has written several art books. Since 1967 he has exhibited in museums and galleries inside and outside his country and participated in biennials in places such as Paris (1977); Sydney (1990), Istanbul (1995) and Sao Paulo (2006). One of his most notable exhibitions was Continuum XXVIII, held in 2010 at the Profile Foundation in Warsaw.

 

2 Carlo Mollino (Italian, 1905-1973)
Chair, late 1950s to early 1960s, executed by Apelli & Varesio, Turin, in solid oak, mounted with brass fittings and spacers; seat with original upholstery in synthetic velvet
CRP218

Born in Turin. An architect, designer and photographer; his architecture and furniture are famous for their ability to allow occupants to manipulate volumes as they please. He began his career as an architect in 1930; in the 1930s, in collaboration with Vittorio Baudi di Selve, he designed the building of the Società Ippica Torinese, considered his masterpiece but destroyed in 1960; he broke with the past and the fascist regime and was inspired by Aalto and Mendelsohn. In the 1960s and 70s he designed numerous interiors for private houses and various buildings, especially in Turin, having started working as an interior designer and furniture designer in the 1940s.

 

3 J. S. Ford, Johnson and Company
Armchair, c. 1905, stained oak
CRP028

The Ford & Johnson Company was founded by John Sherlock Ford and Henry W. Johnson in Columbus (Ohio) in 1867 as a chair and armchair manufacturing company. In 1868 the company moved its factory to Michigan City (Indiana); in 1872, to Chicago, changing its name to J. S Ford, Johnson & Company. It made high-quality furniture, especially mission-style chairs, armchairs and sofas, the solid furniture that was supposed to equip the Spanish missions in the United States; it was sold all over the country. The company went bankrupt in 1913 and was sold.

 

4 Gustave Serrurier-Bovy (Belgian, 1858-1910)
Silex armchair, 1905, poplar tree wood, painted screws and washers
CRP027

Architect and furniture designer born in Liège. Hanka, Horta, Van de Velde and he were the creators of the modernist style. He visited London in 1884 and, fascinated by Morris’ work, struck up an interest in the Arts & Crafts movement. Returning to Belgium, he designed his villa, L’Aube (Liège), and produced works for the Brussels International Exposition in 1897. He made simple, linear and elegant furniture; he was particularly fond of mahogany and, like Van de Velde, he had a predilection for metalwork (iron, brass, bronze and copper). He presented his works at the International Expositions in London, Paris and Saint Louis. His most famous creations include the Pavillon Bleu restaurant for the Paris exhibition of 1900 and “Silex” furniture: tables, chairs, bedrooms. He resorted more than his English colleagues to asymmetry and was the inventor of “combined furniture”, which joined several pieces into one.

Made by Serrurier-Bovy Cie. (Liège).

 

5 Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870-1956)
Armchair, 1905, executed by the Wiener Werkstätte in painted pine 
CRP024 

Born in Plenitz (Moravia), he was an architect whose work was important in the early development of modern architecture in Europe. He studied under Otto Wagner in Vienna, and was a founding member of the Viennese Secession in 1899, which embraced the Art Nouveau style more than Wagner. In 1899 he started teaching at the Vienna School of Applied Arts, and in 1903 participated in the creation of Wiener Werkstätte, which he directed for 30 years. His initial period is marked by the design of the Sanatorium Purkersdorf. His masterpiece is the Stoclet House in Brussels, with its monumental yet elegant exterior. He designed the Austrian pavilions for the Deutscher Werkbund exhibition in Cologne (1914) and the 1934 Venice Biennale. In 1920 he was appointed municipal architect of Vienna and in 1924 and 1925 he produced various house projects for the city.

 

6 Jozef Peeters (Belgian, 1895-1960)
Cabinet Alles voor Vlaanderen, Vlaanderen voor Kristus, c. 1922, painted birch and plywood 
CRP042

A painter, graphic artist and designer born in Antwerp. With Donas, Eemans, Flouquet, Léonard, Maes, Servranckx and Vantongerloo he forms the group of the first abstract artists of Belgium. In 1913 he entered the Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, although he was most interested in personal experimentation. In 1914 he painted “Luminist” landscapes and portraits. In 1915-1917, inspired by Theosophy, he moved towards Symbolism. In 1918 he met Marinetti and joined the Futurist movement. With Van Dooren and Cockx he founded the Modern Art group in Antwerp, which established international contacts, for example with the Der Sturm gallery, Berlin’s avant-garde centre, and organised three art congresses accompanied by exhibitions. He showed his first abstract painting in 1920. He took part in international exhibitions such as those in Geneva in 1921 and Budapest in 1924. He collaborated with avant-garde magazines such as Het Overzicht, which he co-founded in 1921, as well as De Driehoekin 1925, which supported constructivism. His work is in the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Ghent and the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Belgium in Antwerp and Brussels. His work has been exhibited in museums around the world, such as Leiden’s Lakenhal and London’s Tate Modern.

 

7 Marc Maet (Belgian, 1955-2000)
The Mouth of the Sky, 1988, acrylic, lacquer, leather and felt on canvas
CRP257

Born in Schoten (Flanders, Belgium). He lived and worked in Ghent. His work has been divided into three periods: at the beginning of the 80s he came close to the Expressionism of Neue Wilde; at the end of that decade he followed dominant international trends and in the 90s he evolved to take on a vigorous literary style rooted in Belgian artistic heritage. Along with Philippe Vandenberg, Fik van Gestel and others he is considered to be an outstanding representative of New Painting in Belgium. From 1991-2000 he was on the borderline between the figurative and the non-figurative. In the Magritte tradition, he gave an important role to words; his paintings often feature words and images of a symbolic nature.

 

8 Marc Maet (Belgian, 1955-2000)
Passion – Passion, 1990, acrylic and polyester on canvas
CRP258

 

9 Karen Gunderson (American, 1943)
Rounding the Cape, 2004, oil on canvas
CRP296

Born in Racine (Wisconsin). In 1965 she earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Wisconsin State University, Whitewater, and in 1968 a Master’s degree in painting from Iowa University. Her first works were plexiglass constructions using images of clouds. In 1971, she had a major solo exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. In 1972 she came into contact with the artist Sol Lewitt, who became a great source of inspiration for her. In 1973 she moved to New York and taught at the Tisch Art School, as she had done before at Cornell College in Iowa and Ohio State University, and would do later at Mount Saint Vincent College in Riverdale (New York). In 1988 she began creating illuminated black paintings, which she exhibited in 1990 at the Cherry Stone Gallery in Wellfleet (Massachusetts). In 2001 she took part in the Florence Biennale and won the Lorenzo il Magnifico painting prize. In 2004, she exhibited her black paintings at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid. In 2006 she was the subject of a documentary, Karen Gunderson: the black paintings, directed by Lisa Ades. The continuous transformation of light and the importance of the viewer’s position are basic elements of her work. Her subjects include the sea, mountains, the moon, flowers, and constellations. She is also interested in historical episodes, as can be seen in series such as Kings, where she deals with the rescue of the Jews during World War II. Her work can be found in the museums of San Francisco and Cleveland.

 

10 Karen Gunderson (American, 1943)
Moonlite Sea, 2004, oil on canvas
CRP295

 

11 Jaroslaw Kozlowski (Polish, 1945)
Drawing Fact IV, 1979, graphite on paper
CRP239

 

12 Jaroslaw Kozlowski (Polish, 1945)
Empathy of the Truth to the Life and Vice Versa, 2010, 2 tables, 4 chairs, 2 plants (1 artificial, 1 real)
CRP240

ROOM 16

Vista de la sala 4, con la obra The Falling Man de Ernest Trova en primer plano.

View of room 16, with works by Flouquet and Schlemmer (sculpture, center).

Ivan Liun, Carpintero.

Pierre-Louis Flouquet, Féminités.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Man Ray, Untitled.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Piet Hein Eek, Kröller-Müller Museum Chair.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Oskar Schlemmer, Grotesque III.

ROOM 16

1 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Le penseur mol, c. 1928, oil on canvas
CRP120

Born in Paris, in 1910 his family moved to Brussels, where he studied with Constant Montald and Gisbert Combaz at the Academy of Fine Arts. He connected with the avant-garde of Antwerp, Berlin, Brussels, Lausanne and Paris; sharing a studio with Magritte in Brussels. In modernist circles he was known for his abstractions and biomorphic and geometric works. In 1921 he took part in the International Exhibition of Modern Art in Geneva and, with Magritte, in the Centre d’Art in Brussels. He was co-founder of the avant-garde group 7 Arts; he was responsible for the painting section of its magazine and its illustrator. Alongside Eisenstein, Ernst, Gropius, Schlemmer, Servranckx and others he was a regular guest at Baroness Hélène de Mandrot’s Maison des Artistes, at her Château de La Sarraz, near Lausanne, where the First International Congress of Modern Architecture, the First Congress of Independent Cinema in 1929 and many other early 20th century revolutionary artistic manifestations were held. Hélène de Mandrot, like Katherine Dreier and Gertrude Stein, is one of the mainstays of modern art. In 1925, Flouquet founded the L’Assaut group with Gailliard and organised exhibitions under his aegis. As a leader of La Plastique Pure, he regularly exhibited abroad: Buenos Aires, Chicago, Leipzig, Madrid, Monza, New York, Paris, Philadelphia and Zurich; alone, in 1925 at the Der Sturm gallery and in 1927 at the Deutsche Werkbund in Stuttgart, founded by Henry van de Velde, who invited him. He designed many covers for the revolutionary art magazine Der Sturm. His work can be found in museums such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, the Museum of Ghent and the avant-garde Museum of Grenoble; it has been exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden, the Museum of Ghent and the Tate Modern in London, among others. 

It was in the collection of Belgian artist Victor Servranckx.

 

2 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967) 
Féminités, 1923, oil on canvas 
CRP109

 

3 Piet Hein Eek (Dutch, 1967)
4 Kröller-Müller Museum chairs, 1990, recycled wood
CRP393 

2 Tree-Trunk chairs, 1990, recycled wood
CRP394 

Dutch industrial designer. He studied at the Eindhoven Design Academy; he moved away from the minimalist trend and worked with humble materials in order to achieve efficiency, sustainability and social responsibility. He used recycled materials and in 1990 started creating his “scrapwood” cupboards. He founded a company with the designer Nob Ruijgrok and manufactured all kinds of household objects; he founded a restaurant equipped with his pieces, as well as an art gallery, all in his studio in Eindhoven.

 

4 Piet Hein Eek (Dutch, 1967)
Rectangular table, recycled steel
CRP395 

 

5 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Féminités, 1923-26, oil on canvas
CRP111

 

6 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (/French, 1900-1967)
Féminités (diptych), 1923-25, oil on canvas
CRP110

 

7 Man Ray (American, 1890-1976)
Untitled, c. 1960, wood
CRP219

A photographer, painter and filmmaker of the Dada and Surrealist movements, he was born in Philadelphia (USA) into a family of Jewish immigrants who soon moved to Brooklyn. He saw European avant-garde art in Alfred Stieglitz’s “291 Gallery”; in 1915 he met Marcel Duchamp, his main influence; with Francis Picabia, they created the Dada group in New York. He began to create ready-mades and cubist and abstract paintings. In 1921 he went to Paris, joined the Surrealist movement and worked as a photographer to finance his painting, experimenting constantly; he invented rayograms and other techniques. He developed fashion photography and portraiture, worked for magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar and Vanity Fair and took portrait shots of Joyce, Hemingway, Breton, Duchamp, Peggy Guggenheim and Dora Maar. His photographs appeared in the main magazines of the movement between 1920 and 1930. One of his most famous snapshots, El violín de Ingres, dates from 1924. In 1936 he was included in the exhibitions Cubism and abstract art and Fantastic art, dada, surrealism (MoMA). In 1940, the advance of the German army forced him to leave Paris and move to Los Angeles; in 1951, back in Paris, he continued to paint and experiment with new techniques for colour photographs, and began to write his memoirs. In his later years he exhibited in New York, London or Paris.

 

8 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
L’ange du soir, 1931, oil on canvas
CRP121

 

9 Oskar Schlemmer (German, 1888-1943)
Grotesque III, 1923-32, afzelia wood, incrusted and applied ivory, steel rod, 2 brass nails
CRP146

Painter, sculptor, designer and choreographer of the Bauhaus, he stood out in scenic design in the area of ballet. Born in Stuttgart, he studied at the Stuttgart School of Applied Arts and at the Stuttgart Academy of Fine Arts with Christian Ladenberger and Friedrich von Keller. He returned after a stay in Berlin; then studied with Alfred Hölzel, a pioneer of Abstraction. He employed a growing schematisation of figures, as a figurative variant of Constructivism. In 1919 he tried to reform the Stuttgart Academy programme and for Paul Klee to be hired, but he did not succeed. He exhibited in the Der Sturm gallery in Berlin and the Arnold gallery in Dresden. In 1920 Gropius called him to the Bauhaus, where he directed the sculpture and mural painting workshop and then the theatre workshop, as he would continue to do in Dessau, where the Bauhaus was moved to in 1925, and he presented his idea of total art. In 1922 he premiered his Ballet Triádico, which earned him international fame; he gave it this title as the work has three acts, three dancers and three colours; the costumes were based on geometric bodies. It reflected his primordial interest, the human figure and his study of the problematics of figures in space. In 1929 he took up a post at the Academy in Breslau, which was closed because of the economic crisis; in 1932 he took up another post in Berlin, but was forced to resign by the Nazis, who included him among the “degenerate” artists. He went to Switzerland, but returned to Germany even though he was not allowed to exercise his profession. His last works (1942) are a series of windows through which interiors and people can be seen. His work can be found at the Bauhaus Museum (Berlin), the Guggenheim (New York), the MoMA, Dallas, Chicago, Washington, San Francisco, the Reina Sofia and the Thyssen (Madrid).

Devised about 1916-23. It was in the collection of baroness Hélène Revilliod de Mandrot, La Sarraz.

 

ROOM 16

Vista de sala con el Gesú de Longobardi en el centro y obras de Vanriet y De Cock en paneles.

View of room 16, with works by Flouquet and Schlemmer (sculpture, center).

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 1).

Pierre-Louis Flouquet, Féminités.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Man Ray, Untitled.

Andrew Tift, 22 Years Later (díptico 2).

Piet Hein Eek, Kröller-Müller Museum Chair.

Maria Roosen, Red Roosenary.

Oskar Schlemmer, Grotesque III.

 

ROOM 16

 

1 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Le penseur mol, c. 1928, oil on canvas
CRP120

Born in Paris, in 1910 his family moved to Brussels, where he studied with Constant Montald and Gisbert Combaz at the Academy of Fine Arts. He connected with the avant-garde of Antwerp, Berlin, Brussels, Lausanne and Paris; sharing a studio with Magritte in Brussels. In modernist circles he was known for his abstractions and biomorphic and geometric works. In 1921 he took part in the International Exhibition of Modern Art in Geneva and, with Magritte, in the Centre d’Art in Brussels. He was co-founder of the avant-garde group 7 Arts; he was responsible for the painting section of its magazine and its illustrator. Alongside Eisenstein, Ernst, Gropius, Schlemmer, Servranckx and others he was a regular guest at Baroness Hélène de Mandrot’s Maison des Artistes, at her Château de La Sarraz, near Lausanne, where the First International Congress of Modern Architecture, the First Congress of Independent Cinema in 1929 and many other early 20th century revolutionary artistic manifestations were held. Hélène de Mandrot, like Katherine Dreier and Gertrude Stein, is one of the mainstays of modern art. In 1925, Flouquet founded the L’Assaut group with Gailliard and organised exhibitions under his aegis. As a leader of La Plastique Pure, he regularly exhibited abroad: Buenos Aires, Chicago, Leipzig, Madrid, Monza, New York, Paris, Philadelphia and Zurich; alone, in 1925 at the Der Sturm gallery and in 1927 at the Deutsche Werkbund in Stuttgart, founded by Henry van de Velde, who invited him. He designed many covers for the revolutionary art magazine Der Sturm. His work can be found in museums such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and Antwerp, the Museum of Ghent and the avant-garde Museum of Grenoble; it has been exhibited at the Stedelijk Museum Lakenhal in Leiden, the Museum of Ghent and the Tate Modern in London, among others. 

It was in the collection of Belgian artist Victor Servranckx.

 

2 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967) 
Féminités, 1923, oil on canvas 
CRP109

 

3 Piet Hein Eek (Dutch, 1967)
4 Kröller-Müller Museum chairs, 1990, recycled wood
CRP393 

2 Tree-Trunk chairs, 1990, recycled wood
CRP394 

Dutch industrial designer. He studied at the Eindhoven Design Academy; he moved away from the minimalist trend and worked with humble materials in order to achieve efficiency, sustainability and social responsibility. He used recycled materials and in 1990 started creating his “scrapwood” cupboards. He founded a company with the designer Nob Ruijgrok and manufactured all kinds of household objects; he founded a restaurant equipped with his pieces, as well as an art gallery, all in his studio in Eindhoven.

 

4 Piet Hein Eek (Dutch, 1967)
Rectangular table, recycled steel
CRP395 

 

5 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
Féminités, 1923-26, oil on canvas
CRP111

 

6 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (/French, 1900-1967)
Féminités (diptych), 1923-25, oil on canvas
CRP110

 

7 Man Ray (American, 1890-1976)
Untitled, c. 1960, wood
CRP219

A photographer, painter and filmmaker of the Dada and Surrealist movements, he was born in Philadelphia (USA) into a family of Jewish immigrants who soon moved to Brooklyn. He saw European avant-garde art in Alfred Stieglitz’s “291 Gallery”; in 1915 he met Marcel Duchamp, his main influence; with Francis Picabia, they created the Dada group in New York. He began to create ready-mades and cubist and abstract paintings. In 1921 he went to Paris, joined the Surrealist movement and worked as a photographer to finance his painting, experimenting constantly; he invented rayograms and other techniques. He developed fashion photography and portraiture, worked for magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar and Vanity Fair and took portrait shots of Joyce, Hemingway, Breton, Duchamp, Peggy Guggenheim and Dora Maar. His photographs appeared in the main magazines of the movement between 1920 and 1930. One of his most famous snapshots, El violín de Ingres, dates from 1924. In 1936 he was included in the exhibitions Cubism and abstract art and Fantastic art, dada, surrealism (MoMA). In 1940, the advance of the German army forced him to leave Paris and move to Los Angeles; in 1951, back in Paris, he continued to paint and experiment with new techniques for colour photographs, and began to write his memoirs. In his later years he exhibited in New York, London or Paris.

 

8 Pierre-Louis Flouquet (French, 1900-1967)
L’ange du soir, 1931, oil on canvas
CRP121

 

9 Oskar Schlemmer (German, 1888-1943)
Grotesque III, 1923-32, afzelia wood, incrusted and applied ivory, steel rod, 2 brass nails
CRP146

Painter, sculptor, designer and choreographer of the Bauhaus, he stood out in scenic design in the area of ballet. Born in Stuttgart, he studied at the Stuttgart School of Applied Arts and at the Stuttgart Academy of Fine Arts with Christian Ladenberger and Friedrich von Keller. He returned after a stay in Berlin; then studied with Alfred Hölzel, a pioneer of Abstraction. He employed a growing schematisation of figures, as a figurative variant of Constructivism. In 1919 he tried to reform the Stuttgart Academy programme and for Paul Klee to be hired, but he did not succeed. He exhibited in the Der Sturm gallery in Berlin and the Arnold gallery in Dresden. In 1920 Gropius called him to the Bauhaus, where he directed the sculpture and mural painting workshop and then the theatre workshop, as he would continue to do in Dessau, where the Bauhaus was moved to in 1925, and he presented his idea of total art. In 1922 he premiered his Ballet Triádico, which earned him international fame; he gave it this title as the work has three acts, three dancers and three colours; the costumes were based on geometric bodies. It reflected his primordial interest, the human figure and his study of the problematics of figures in space. In 1929 he took up a post at the Academy in Breslau, which was closed because of the economic crisis; in 1932 he took up another post in Berlin, but was forced to resign by the Nazis, who included him among the “degenerate” artists. He went to Switzerland, but returned to Germany even though he was not allowed to exercise his profession. His last works (1942) are a series of windows through which interiors and people can be seen. His work can be found at the Bauhaus Museum (Berlin), the Guggenheim (New York), the MoMA, Dallas, Chicago, Washington, San Francisco, the Reina Sofia and the Thyssen (Madrid).

Devised about 1916-23. It was in the collection of baroness Hélène Revilliod de Mandrot, La Sarraz.